Author Topic: John, this is the year....I'm going to try a Cambozola.  (Read 4790 times)

Offline Likesspace

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John, this is the year....I'm going to try a Cambozola.
« on: October 13, 2009, 07:56:11 PM »
I guess the title of this post pretty much says it all.
In the past I've gotten pretty comfortable with a few different cheese varities that I've continued to make over and over.
In the past I've focused, for the most part, on Gouda, Swiss, Stilton and Camembert.
Although I've had several failures with these cheeses I've also had certain amounts of success as well.
Well this year I've decided to continue to make the Stilton (because I love to eat this cheese) as well as Swiss because making a good swiss has become personal.
I will also continue trying to make a decent traditional cheddar (simply because it's such a fun and challenging cheese to do correctly) but my real passion this year is to turn out a decent Cambozola.
I've never attempted this cheese but last year I feel that I finally got a handle on making a very good Camembert (thanks to Tom aka FineWino).
The very last example of this cheese that I made was something that I would put up against any commercial variety that I've tasted.
Now having said that I know that adding p. roq. adds a whole new dimension to this type of cheese but just thinking about the challenge gives me a happy feeling.
The first cheese that I've decided to make is a Romano and then I will move on to something that's also simple like a Manchego. These two cheeses will simply help me to sharpen my skills that I'm certain have faded over the past 6 months or so.
After that I will probably do a Stilton and a Camembert on the same day and then it will be "go time" on the Cambozola.
So my question is this.......
Do you (John) or anyone else have any tricks or traps you can share with me concerning this variety? I've read through a few different recipes for Cambozola but I'd really love to see success from the "get go".
Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Dave


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Offline Tea

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Re: John, this is the year....I'm going to try a Cambozola.
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2009, 03:09:14 PM »
Good luck Dave.  This is one that I would love to try also, but like you, would like to first master getting the base cheese right first.  Keep us posted on your trials.

Offline John (CH)

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Re: John, this is the year....I'm going to try a Cambozola.
« Reply #2 on: October 18, 2009, 07:20:20 AM »
Dave, good luck, my only try was a flop. But when trying to make a Semi-Lactic P candidum cheese I accidentally got wild blue mold on them and the one that was squished had cavities inside with blue mold in them and was wonderful and very Cambozola like!

At one time I built an info page on Cambozola which I understand is a brand name, but not much there. Re-reading wikipedia on it, it also goes under the name Blue Brie as Cambozola is a copywrited name.

What I can't figure out with all these P candidum and P roqueforti cross cheeses is how their rinds have no bloom.

Offline Likesspace

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Re: John, this is the year....I'm going to try a Cambozola.
« Reply #3 on: October 18, 2009, 05:23:01 PM »
John,
I have to admit that I'm a little nervous about this one. I've tried doing as much reading as possible, but there is really very little information concerning the making of this type of cheese.
After my "alien" batch of Camembert, last year, I don't really see how things could go much worse but you never know.....at least that cheese didn't end up attacking my family in the middle of the night. :)
As I said earlier, I'm going to get a few cheeses under my belt and then give this one a try.
As much as it pains me to say so I will be sure to keep you up to date even if it does turn out to be a failure.

Dave

Offline Tea

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Re: John, this is the year....I'm going to try a Cambozola.
« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2009, 03:15:33 PM »
Well I am going to bite the bullet and make what is called a "blue and white" cheese today.  I thought I might ash half and leave half normal and see what the difference is.  Will update as I go.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2009, 05:36:39 PM by Tea »


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Offline Likesspace

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Re: John, this is the year....I'm going to try a Cambozola.
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2009, 05:10:21 PM »
Great, Tea!
I can't wait to hear how it turns out.
Good luck and keep us posted.

Dave

Offline Tea

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Re: John, this is the year....I'm going to try a Cambozola.
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2009, 05:38:19 PM »
Well first hesitation, I have put the blue suspension in the freezer, instead of the fridge, so hopefully I haven't killed it. >:(

Milk just setting as I type, so will take some photo's as I mould.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: John, this is the year....I'm going to try a Cambozola.
« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2009, 12:35:05 AM »
I don't know if it will help but I got this recipe from Steve Sampson a while back. He seems to make great cheeses. He used to email recipes every once and awhile but hasn't in a long time.

Cambozola Cheese - Steve Shapson The Cheesemaker
Cambozola is a cow's milk cheese that is a combination of a French soft-ripened triple cream cheese and Italian Gorgonzola.

Ingredients:
Mesophilic Starter Culture (MM100-101 series or MA4000-4001 series or MA11-14-16 series)
MA11-14-16 series)
Penicillum Candidum
Penicillium Roqueforti
Rennet(dissolved in a little amount of cool water)
Calcium Chloride/optional/use ¼ tsp.(1.25ml) in ¼ cup of cool water.

Milk:
Raw milk or 1 part heavy cream to 7 parts skim milk or non-homogenized
whole milk.

Procedure:
Heat milk/cream to 85f (29.5c). Maintain this temperature throughout
the process. For a 2 gallon (8 liters) milk batch use approximately 1/8th
tsp. of the Mesophilic Starter Culture. Sprinkle the culture onto the
warmed milk, letting it thoroughly dissolve before gently stirring,
using top to bottom strokes. Add the rennet and stir gently for about 2-4
minutes.

Let the curd set and test for clean break after about 60 minutes. After getting a clean, gently cut curds into ½ inch (1.5cm) cubes.

Stir curds in the whey for 2 minutes.

Drain off 100% of the whey from the curds using either a colander or draining bag for 25-30 minutes.

Now ladle the drained curds in your camembert moulds until they are half
full using about 50% of the curds. Sprinkle a very small dusting of P.
roqueforti mold powder (about 1/8 tsp.) on the top of the curds. 

Ladle the rest of the curds into the half full Camembert moulds. Let the
filled moulds drain for 16-24 hours until you see no additional draining.

Turn the moulds over during this draining period at least 5 times so they drain uniformly.

After the cheese has fully drained you will want to lightly sprinkle
 about 1 tsp. of course non-iodized salt on all sides of each cheese.
 After salting, the cheeses can be set aside to age.


Once your cheese are drained and firm enough, take them out of their moulds and place them onto a draining mat/platform and place in a plastic container to begin aging. The temperature should be 50-54f (10-12c) in your aging room. Cover your aging container when the cheeses no longer look excessively moist, making sure there is no moisture touching your cheeses. Flip your cheeses daily using clean hands.

The white mold should begin to appear within 3-6 days, maybe a
bit longer if the temperature is colder. After you see a good covering
of white mold bloom on the cheeses, use a clean knitting needle or clean
thin Phillips Head screwdriver, poke about 10 holes through the top of
each cheese. These holes will air and help in the development of blue
veining. Continue to age at 40-50f. You may have to re-poke holes if
additional white mold bloom covers the holes.

About 10-14 days after the first poking, wrap you cheeses in White Mold Paper and continue to age until you like the flavor. When the center of the cheese is a bit soft to the touch it has completed aging.  You can cut one cheese in half to see how ripe it is. A longer aging period will result in a stronger blue flavor.

Offline Tea

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Re: John, this is the year....I'm going to try a Cambozola.
« Reply #8 on: October 25, 2009, 03:15:08 PM »
Well here is what I have done.

10ltr milk
100ml meso starter
2.5ml rennent
5 drops blue suspension

Heat milk to 33C add starter, blue suspension, stir well.  Add rennent and stir in well. Sit for 35-40mins until set.
Cut into 1.5cm cubes and let sit for 5 mins.  Gently stir curds for 15 mins maintaining setting temp.  Drain off whey and turn curds for further 5 mins.  Place curds into moulds, and flip after 1/2 hour, then every hour or so for the next 3-4 hours.  Let sit over night, and place in cold 20% brine for 1 hour.

Ok so this is where I am upto.  I am though going to try and ash a few, and see what the difference is in the final cheese.

Offline Tea

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Re: John, this is the year....I'm going to try a Cambozola.
« Reply #9 on: October 25, 2009, 03:24:07 PM »
Ok here they are out of the brine drying.  They are to dry overnight and cool to 12C, so into a separate cave they go.


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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: John, this is the year....I'm going to try a Cambozola.
« Reply #10 on: October 25, 2009, 11:03:47 PM »
Nice batch to cheeses you got there gal! Good Job!

Offline Tea

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Re: John, this is the year....I'm going to try a Cambozola.
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2009, 04:55:14 PM »
So after being dried overnight and cooled to 12C  they have been pierced at approx every 1.5cm top and sides.  I used the temp gauge showing.  Then the cheese are immersed in 90-95C hot water for 5 seconds, then cooled and sprayed well with a solution of white mould.
Now I will let them dry a little, ash a couple ad transfer them to the cave.


Offline Tea

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Re: John, this is the year....I'm going to try a Cambozola.
« Reply #12 on: October 26, 2009, 06:50:11 PM »
Ashed the two thickest cheeses, and in the cave.

Offline Likesspace

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Re: John, this is the year....I'm going to try a Cambozola.
« Reply #13 on: October 26, 2009, 07:18:56 PM »
Tea,
You never cease to amaze me with the quality of cheese you turn out and how you are willing to try new things.
Those little wheels are about as professional looking as I've seen on this board.
I can't wait to see how well they age and if they turn into a proper blue and white. Great work!

Dave

Offline Tea

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Re: John, this is the year....I'm going to try a Cambozola.
« Reply #14 on: October 26, 2009, 07:52:49 PM »
Why thankyou Dave.  As I am just a home cook, I guess I am used to just throwing together what ever is in the pantry and see how it goes.  Thankfully most of the time, it works.

I too am really looking forward to seeing how these work out.  I find myself wanting to check the cave every couple of hours.   ;)   Like there has really been any change, but just in case.  :D