Author Topic: Newbie at aged cheese  (Read 670 times)

Offline hydromojo

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Newbie at aged cheese
« on: November 13, 2009, 08:32:21 AM »
Hello,
This is my first attempt at ageing cheese. Any rules of thumb you people think I need to keep in mind ? I've made ricotta, mozzarella, cream cheese and neufchatel earlier, but never done any sort of ageing.
My culture is going to be a simple thermo/meso starter - eiher homemade yogurt or buttermilk.

Thanks in advance!

Raol


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Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Newbie at aged cheese
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2009, 09:10:18 AM »
There are lots of different approaches to aging. Waxed, Natural Rind, Vacuum Bagging.....  Depends on the type of cheese and what you are trying to accomplish.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Offline hydromojo

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Re: Newbie at aged cheese
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2009, 10:08:29 AM »
I'm no sure I know what I want as an end product. I'm assuming my limited starter cultures are a downside. All I'm looking at getting at the end of some reasonable (I'm just starting out, so dont think I can wait that long :-P ) time is a cheese that tastes like its been aged.

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Newbie at aged cheese
« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2009, 10:45:15 AM »
"Limited" starter cultures are NOT a downside. You can make some great cheeses with just yogurt or buttermilk as starters. You need to read up quite a bit to know which one. Search the forum and you will find tons of information.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Offline Alex

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Re: Newbie at aged cheese
« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2009, 01:16:01 PM »
I'm no sure I know what I want as an end product. I'm assuming my limited starter cultures are a downside. All I'm looking at getting at the end of some reasonable (I'm just starting out, so dont think I can wait that long :-P ) time is a cheese that tastes like its been aged.

All my cheeses are made with butter-milk and/or yogourt. They turn out wanderfull. As for ageing you have to decide about the type of cheese. Different cheeses have to be aged accordingly.
Alex-The Cheesepenter


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