Author Topic: Lipase - Vegetarian Replacement?  (Read 5083 times)

Offline zapnathaz

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Lipase - Vegetarian Replacement?
« on: November 15, 2009, 11:02:21 PM »
Is there a source for a microbial based lipase ....I found vegetable rennet but still searching for a
lipase that is plant sourced....I have heard of oats having a high lipase content....anyone have
experience with using plant based lipase?

          thanks

Offline John (CH)

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Re: Lipase - Vegetarian Replacement?
« Reply #1 on: November 16, 2009, 05:11:05 AM »
Zap, welcome to this forum ;D.

Good question, not that I've heard of.

Most people add Lipase when called for and using cow or sheep's milk. My understanding is that if using goat's milk then it is already "built-in", but that pasteurization can somewhat inactivate it, so in summary don't need it if using raw goat's milk.

Others?

Offline zapnathaz

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Re: Lipase - Vegetarian Replacement?
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2009, 09:10:36 AM »
thanks John...guess I will look for a local farmer for a supply of raw milk....I was going to attempt
making provolone, the reciept for which calls for lipase. I suppose i could go without but I don't
think flavor would be as true...

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Lipase - Vegetarian Replacement?
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2009, 09:49:00 AM »
Lipase is a naturally occurring enzyme, not an animal product per se. Lipases perform essential roles in the digestion, transport and processing of dietary lipids (e.g. triglycerides, fats, oils) in most, if not all, living organisms.

So, Lipase from a cow should be exactly the same thing as Lipase from a plant. The problem is that plants produce very small quantities, so it's not practical to extract it. "Oats" may have a lot of Lipase, but not in a form that is readily available for making cheese.

Milk, even pasteurized, whether it's cow or goat milk has some Lipase depending on the diet of the animal, etc. In fact, raw milk has over 60 different enzymes. Some make it through pasteurization, but many are deactivated or damaged.

The aging and flavor of all cheeses comes mainly from enzyme activity and NOT from bacteria, so the Lipase is VERY important, especially for Italian type cheeses. If you want a great Parmesan, I would NOT trust that any milk is going to have enough natural Lipase to give that nice sharp flavor.
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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Lipase - Vegetarian Replacement?
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2009, 10:59:11 AM »
Never tried a plant lipase, but you can buy it and try

http://www.naturalhealthyconcepts.com/lipase-concentrate-hp-IT90-p-tyler.html

Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Lipase - Vegetarian Replacement?
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2009, 12:44:33 PM »
These are just 55 mg capsules, so this is a very expensive way to go. It also contains other ingredients - cellulose, vegetable polysaccharide capsule, and ascorbyl palmitate. Maybe our regular Lipase does too. I haven't looked.

Ingredients:
2 UltraCaps contain:
Plant Enzymes 110 mg
Lipase I, II
Assay Method
FIP (pH 7.0) 12,600 FIP
FCC III (pH 6.5) 5,160 LU
Other Ingredients: cellulose, vegetable polysaccharide capsule, and ascorbyl palmitate.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
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Offline zapnathaz

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Re: Lipase - Vegetarian Replacement?
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2009, 10:12:40 AM »
Much thanks to Linuxboy and Sailor Con Queso for your kind insights...I will digest it all and make
a next step....I am gratefull and truly impressed by the quality of this forum

Offline milkprotein_fat

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Re: Lipase - Vegetarian Replacement?
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2009, 09:31:00 AM »
You can buy a fungal (microbial) Lipase and it would do a similar job, i.e., breaking down fat (triglycerides) into free fatty acids for flavour generation.