Author Topic: Washed curd cheese experiment 11.30.2009 MrsKK  (Read 1325 times)

Offline MrsKK

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Washed curd cheese experiment 11.30.2009 MrsKK
« on: December 01, 2009, 07:11:24 AM »
Unless someone wants me to post the recipe, which originally came from Ricki Carroll's book, I won't.  Mostly because I made this cheese as an experiment to compare to previous Colby's I made earlier in the month.  I also wanted to experiment with a couple of techniques I have read about others on the forum using.

My four test situations:
 
1)I've been skimming a lot of milk to make Mascarpone from the cream, so I had 3 gallons of skimmed milk to use up.  Not in the mood for making mozz, I decided to follow a Colby recipe using 3 gallons skimmed and 2 gallons whole milk.  My milk is raw. 

Results:  about 1/3 less cheese curd than when I have used all whole milk for making Colby.  It will take time to see how it affects the texture, moisture and flavor of the cheese.  In future, I will use my skim for cheeses that call for it specifically.

2) I have homemade cream cheese culture (originally started out as clabbered milk several generations ago).  I've been using this culture to make sour cream and cream cheese with excellent results both in flavor and texture and I wanted to see how it might affect the flavor of my Colby.  The previous two Colby batches I made with mesophilic culture. 

Results:  The curd had a very pleasant smell to it and a good flavor for fresh curds.  Further results will have to be noted after the cheese ages.

3) I normally use a water bath on my stove, but the outer kettle is six inches shorter than the milk kettle and less 2 inches wider, leaving little room for water around the milk kettle.  For this cheese, I used my utility sink and hot tap water for warming the milk. 

Results:  The milk heated up a lot faster than it does on the stovetop with a water bath, and I had a lot more control over the
temperature of the milk, simply raising the level of the water when I needed more heat and lowering the level to stop heating or to cool it off.  I like!

4) Upon FarmerJD's recommendations, I made a curd bag to fit inside the cheese mold. 

Results: I just turned the cheese from an overnight pressing and there are no crease marks on the cheese.  I will definitely make more of these bags for future use.  I do plan on widening out the top of the bag, so that I can turn it down around the outside of the mold.  I like!

 


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Offline Tea

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Re: Washed curd cheese experiment 11.30.2009 MrsKK
« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2009, 01:28:15 PM »
Isn't it good when you trial something and it works.  And sometimes they are simple adjustment too. 
Ok, so how are you going to age this cheese?  Wax, rind, oil?

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Washed curd cheese experiment 11.30.2009 MrsKK
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2009, 12:24:28 AM »
I heat all of my milk in the sink. Much more control than the stove top.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
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Offline MrsKK

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Re: Washed curd cheese experiment 11.30.2009 MrsKK
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2009, 07:21:49 AM »
I will coat it in lard once it is dry enough.  That's how I've been doing all of my cheeses lately and I really like it.

The nice thing about using my utility room sink is that the room is in the basement of my house and is where I press my cheese anyway.  My milk fridge is in the basement, too.  At least I'm getting some exercise running up and down the stairs!

Offline FarmerJD

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Re: Washed curd cheese experiment 11.30.2009 MrsKK
« Reply #4 on: December 02, 2009, 07:35:53 AM »
Karen,
I made my bag about a half inch wider than the hoop by accident. I found out that by doing this, I was able to fold it down over the top edge of the hoop so that I didn't need a set of hands to hold it while I transferred curds to it. Major advantage. For me the only problem was that the seam wasn't on the edge or the wheel, but actually on the side. I plan on doing what you suggested and tapering the next one so that the top is wider. Great minds think alike. Sounds like you had a good cheese day. Congrats!


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Offline Boofer

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Re: Washed curd cheese experiment 11.30.2009 MrsKK
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2009, 10:57:57 AM »
Can you tell me more about the curd bag? What about the seam? Doesn't it leave a groove or belly button in the cheese?  ;)

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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Washed curd cheese experiment 11.30.2009 MrsKK
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2009, 07:54:48 PM »
Good job Karen!

I like the idea of using the cream cheese nice idea.
Tap water is much easier to control make the job a lot more fun.

Offline FarmerJD

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Re: Washed curd cheese experiment 11.30.2009 MrsKK
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2009, 07:42:27 AM »
Boofer, the bag leaves a seam on the bottom rim of the wheel and one small line up the side which both disappear with drying. The top has much less cloth to deal with as well so you can just fold the excess over and it comes out pretty flat. I posted pics somewhere on here. I will try to find.

Offline Boofer

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Re: Washed curd cheese experiment 11.30.2009 MrsKK
« Reply #8 on: December 04, 2009, 01:41:05 AM »
So I'm thinking I could dig out an old brewing grain bag and use that. Thanks, Farmer.

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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Washed curd cheese experiment 11.30.2009 MrsKK
« Reply #9 on: December 04, 2009, 09:51:50 AM »
Boofer if you press flip the cheese a few times once it's firm enough remove the bag and continue to press you won't get any lines and the ones that are there will disappear.


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Offline Boofer

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Re: Washed curd cheese experiment 11.30.2009 MrsKK
« Reply #10 on: December 04, 2009, 06:33:53 PM »
Debi - Yeah, seems like you told me that once before...I guess that will work okay. I guess my reservations about that before were that it might be too soft at that point and I might get some curd sneaking through the mould pores once I removed the cheesecloth or bag.

I have 2 gallons of whole and 2 gallons of 2% that are headed for an early morning kettle, on their way to Manchego Country. Here's a chance to try a few new tidbits of knowledge, including the one above.

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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Washed curd cheese experiment 11.30.2009 MrsKK
« Reply #11 on: December 04, 2009, 11:16:38 PM »
Boofer the key is to look at them and make sure they are solidly formed first.  ;)