Author Topic: Addition of Penicillium Roqueforti (My first blue)  (Read 2460 times)

Offline driekus

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Addition of Penicillium Roqueforti (My first blue)
« on: December 26, 2009, 05:41:12 PM »
Hi All,
Well after my successfull feta I have decided to move onto a blue cheese. I took a look through the recipe and the thing that sort of confounded me was the addition of mould is meant to be done at the time of mold forming by sprinkling 1/8tsp between the layers split between two moulds. Now this is a really really small amount of mould to spread over such a distance. Does anyone do it differently? Like taking it up in a few mL of water and sprinkling that between the layers?


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Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Addition of Penicillium Roqueforti (My first blue)
« Reply #1 on: December 26, 2009, 06:08:07 PM »
What kind of blue are you making? I always add my Penicillium in the beginning with the starter bacteria. A little goes a long way. :o
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
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Offline driekus

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Re: Addition of Penicillium Roqueforti (My first blue)
« Reply #2 on: December 26, 2009, 06:10:05 PM »
Im aiming at a Roquefort style, although I understand with my newbie skills that making to style may prove a little difficult.

Offline mtncheesemaker(Pam)

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Re: Addition of Penicillium Roqueforti (My first blue)
« Reply #3 on: December 27, 2009, 12:34:08 PM »
I'm planning on making a Roquefort this week from some sheep milk I've been saving in the freezer. I always inoculate my blues with the mold with the starter. My recipe for Roquefort has you sprinkle it on the curds when filling the molds.
Any idea if or why this is necessary?

Offline Alex

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Re: Addition of Penicillium Roqueforti (My first blue)
« Reply #4 on: December 28, 2009, 12:12:19 PM »
Inoculating with the starter is right - you are doing well Pam
Alex-The Cheesepenter


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Offline driekus

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Re: Addition of Penicillium Roqueforti (My first blue)
« Reply #5 on: December 28, 2009, 10:37:32 PM »
Does a higher degree of mold propogation produce a more stronger flavour?
Could the innoculation as the molds are being filled aim to provide internal growth and try to limit external growth?
Im just curious as my cheese making knowledge is limited but my microbiology knowledge is pretty good.

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Addition of Penicillium Roqueforti (My first blue)
« Reply #6 on: December 28, 2009, 11:34:34 PM »
Mold needs air to grow, so you will need to poke lots of holes thru the rind into the interior of the cheese.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Offline mtncheesemaker(Pam)

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Re: Addition of Penicillium Roqueforti (My first blue)
« Reply #7 on: December 29, 2009, 08:41:24 AM »
I did a little more reading and found that a "true" Roquefort does not have mold growing on the outside, just inside. This is the reason, I suppose, for inoculating the curds and not the milk.
I'm inclined to put the mold in with the starter because I've been successful with that method. Maybe I'll try a cow blue the other way. The sheep milk is too precious to risk!

Offline driekus

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Re: Addition of Penicillium Roqueforti (My first blue)
« Reply #8 on: December 29, 2009, 10:43:27 AM »
Im going to do a second blue later this week and am going to try a new technique. I will innoculate the curds as I pour them, but instead of sprinkling it on between the layers (this is really difficult for 1/8 tsp). I will take the mould up in a 1 mL syringe (no needle) as a solution and sprinkle that between the layers. Its all a fun learning experience, the only thing I need to figure out is what I will do with all the cheese :)

Offline driekus

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Re: Addition of Penicillium Roqueforti (My first blue)
« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2009, 07:40:51 PM »
Well I gave it a go innoculating with a solution of the mould, sprinkling between the layers. Works well, each drop spreads within the curds. I will post you an update and tell you how the cheese turns out.  ;D Im really starting to enjoy this cheesemaking, 3 cheeses in 7 days of my holiday. Now to wait and see how they turn out.


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Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Addition of Penicillium Roqueforti (My first blue)
« Reply #10 on: December 30, 2009, 08:32:47 PM »
The P.r. mold will need air to take hold.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Offline driekus

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Re: Addition of Penicillium Roqueforti (My first blue)
« Reply #11 on: December 30, 2009, 08:35:23 PM »
Shouldnt the piercing take care of that?

Offline Alex

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Re: Addition of Penicillium Roqueforti (My first blue)
« Reply #12 on: December 31, 2009, 01:18:15 AM »
Yes, and renew the piercing every 3-5 days, in the same places of course.
Alex-The Cheesepenter

Offline Divey

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Re: Addition of Penicillium Roqueforti (My first blue)
« Reply #13 on: January 02, 2010, 07:51:36 PM »
I am making a 'Stilton' style cheese at the moment. In the past I have used a Penicillium Roqueforte mild blue mold which I added at the rate of one drop of mold suspension per 2 litres of milk. I have some new mold which is in a powder form. I added about as much as you can get on the end of a bamboo skewer and is sitting on top of the milk as though you have sprinkled fine black pepper on the milk, even though I gave it a thorough stirring  I guess is will be mixed up when I cut the curds, however, it does not look just right.

All beer is good, but, unfortunately some are better than others.

Offline driekus

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Re: Addition of Penicillium Roqueforti (My first blue)
« Reply #14 on: January 02, 2010, 07:59:10 PM »
Im guessing the called quantity is 1/8 tsp, similar to the mold im using. Very hard to measure out, I figure using a bit more wont hurt. :) That is also why I switched to making a suspension that I made myself. Thanks for the picture though, it is good to see how other people are solving the problem.

I have a further question, how dry do you let your blues get when drying them. I have a wine fridge set to 11C and I age my cheeses in tupperware containers. The first 6 days I left the tupperware lid slightly ajar to ensure that it dried sufficiently. At that stage the cheese at just ceased being visibly wet. Is this the right stage to seal the cheese up to keep humidity high? Anyone with any good photos :)

Again thanks for the photos

(edited to include question to avoid double post)
« Last Edit: January 02, 2010, 08:13:31 PM by driekus »