Author Topic: Experimental washed curd cheese  (Read 1255 times)

Offline MrsKK

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Experimental washed curd cheese
« on: January 05, 2010, 09:00:13 AM »
Having tasted and really liked some curd from a yogurt-cultured Mozzerella - before stretching it - I decided to try to make a semi-hard, pressed cheese from those curds.  After about 12 days of aging, this cheese was creamy in texture and has a good flavor.  Now to come up with a name!

12/10/2009 Washed Curd Cheese

5 gallons whole, raw milk
2 cups yogurt
4 Junket Rennet tablets (dissolved in 1/2 cup cool water)
1/4 cup kosher salt

Warm milk to 100* Fahrenheit.  Whisk yogurt with some warmed milk until smooth, then whisk into kettle of warmed milk.  Allow to set 1 1/2 hours, maintaining temperature between 90-100* Fahrenheit .

Dissolve rennet in water, stir into cultured milk and wait for clean break (this batch took 2 hours).  Maintain temperature between 90-100* Fahrenheit .

Cut curd into 1/2" pieces, stir gently and cut large curds.  Let sit 15 minutes to heal.

Pour off whey, add one gallon cool water to rinse curds, then drain in colander.  Allow curd to rest in colander for 2 hours.

Cut curd into 1 inch cubes, salt and pack into mold.  Press at 30 lbs for 1 hour.

Turn, redress, and press at 60 lbs for 10 hours.

Turn, redress, and press at 120 lbs for 7 1/2 hours.  The wheel still felt spongy, so I broke up the curd into approximately 1-2 inch chunks and put it back in the mold.  The curd at this point was about the consistency of baked cheesecake.  Pressed at 120 pounds for 5 hours.

Turned and redressed, pressed at 120 lbs for 18 hours. 

As I used a sheeting cheesebag in my mold, the rind on this cheese was very smooth.  It did not seem to be drying out too much, so I did not coat it with anything.

I cut into this cheese on 12/22/2009, so just 12 days after I started it, and was pleased with the flavor and texture.  The cut pieces have been wrapped in waxed paper, then placed in a ziploc bag for storage.

I am starting a new batch today and plan on cutting the curd into slabs after the 2 hours in the colandar step, restacking them, and allowing it to sit for another two hours before milling and salting the curd.  In the hopes of avoidign the spongy curd I had to deal with in the original batch.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Experimental washed curd cheese
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2010, 04:52:40 PM »
Sounds great Karen. How about calling it Karens Kreamy Yogarella!

Offline MrsKK

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Re: Experimental washed curd cheese
« Reply #2 on: January 06, 2010, 08:39:49 AM »
We'll have to see on the name situation!

For the batch I made yesterday, I cut the curd into slabs and stacked them, then flipped them every half hour or so for two hours.  I think that helped get a lot of the whey out, as the wheel was fairly firm this morning when I turned it.

My initial pressing was at 40 lbs for 2 hours, then 80 lbs for 8 hours overnight.  I now have it under 120 lbs and will remove it from the press after 10-12 hours, depending upon my schedule today.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Experimental washed curd cheese
« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2010, 08:48:46 PM »
Well good luck hon I think this will be a nice cheese. Can't wait to see it!

Offline MrsKK

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Re: Experimental washed curd cheese
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2010, 07:58:37 AM »
I forgot the cheese in the press until I came home from work on Thursday morning, so it was under 120 lbs for about 28 hours.  It looked really good though.  I like the smoothness of the rind with the sheeting curd bag (THANKS to FarmerJD's suggestion). 

This morning when I turned the cheese, I noticed a few cracks in the sides, so I put two small bowls full of water in the cabinet next to the cheese, the draped a cloth between the two in the hopes of increasing the humidity and healing those cracks up.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Experimental washed curd cheese
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2010, 02:42:23 PM »
Don't you just hate it when work get in the way of you cheesemaking? I sure do!

Offline MrsKK

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Re: Experimental washed curd cheese
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2010, 09:34:11 AM »
The cracks in the sides just kept getting deeper and wider, even with the added humidity, so I larded and bandaged the sides of the cheese in an attempt to save it.  I'm not getting much moisture on the bottom when I've turned it, so maybe it is nearly ready to be completely coated.

What I really hate is when my fridge is full of milk and I'm just way too tired from working all night to make cheese.  Where in the world is my winning lottery ticket?

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Experimental washed curd cheese
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2010, 02:00:22 PM »
I hear ya Karen - I think your ticket is hiding with mine someplace!  ;D