Author Topic: Alpine Culture?  (Read 1331 times)

Offline Quesa

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Alpine Culture?
« on: January 05, 2010, 09:13:16 AM »
I was reading on a cheese making website and there was mention of an "Alpine Culture."

I don't want to sound dumb, but I've visited many cheese suppliers sites, but haven't seen this type of culture, at least not with that name. Maybe it has another name?

Out of curiosity, I would like to know what it is and if it's used in any other cheeses.

... and, where can it be bought, if one were to need it for a cheese recipe.

Thanks.


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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Alpine Culture?
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2010, 10:00:25 AM »
Hmm, not sure what the site meant. It could be a mother culture from the Alps or it could be something like the Choozit Alp or Alp D. I believe Danlac sells it, it's a Danisco product that's part of their Choozit line.
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Offline Tea

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Re: Alpine Culture?
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2010, 03:09:35 PM »
Reg (an original member here) used to make an Alpine using yoghurt as the culture.  If you look back at some of the original threads, you should be able to find his recipe and methods.

Sorry I can't help you with a culture though.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Alpine Culture?
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2010, 08:05:48 PM »
If you rmember where you saw it we migh be able to popin and try to figure out what they meany by this.

Offline Quesa

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Re: Alpine Culture?
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2010, 08:59:55 PM »
It was mentioned in a discussion of old European cheeses. So, I am beginning to think that "Alpine culture" may refer more to the type of culture used to make the cheese than by the name of the culture itself.

The recipe I saw called for 1/3 cup of yogurt, so this goes back to what Tea mentioned.

Thanks.


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Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Alpine Culture?
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2010, 10:22:47 PM »
To me an Alpine culture is 50% TA61 and 50% LH100. I use this on all thermophylic Swiss types.

I use a 20% TA61 and 80% LH100 blend (with Lipase) on Parmesan and hard Italian types.

TA61 = S. thermophilus (fast acidifying but incomplete sugar breakdown)
LH100 = L. lactis & L. helveticus (completes the sugar breakdown)
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