Author Topic: CROTTIN Recipe  (Read 4220 times)

Offline Cheddarhead

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CROTTIN Recipe
« on: January 06, 2010, 07:06:54 PM »
Hello everyone,
I want to contribute something of value to this forum, so here goes.
I think I have placed this cheese recipe in the correct area, if not, please move it to proper for me John. TY :)
I have tasted store-bought, and quite delicious.  Unfortunately, I am new to cheeses and only tonight going to attempt my second 'easy cheese,' ricotta from whole milk. ( I can make a mean lasagna, lol)
I found this recipe and did not find one in John's recipe list, so it may be that it is new to this forum, or I just haven't found it while slucing through old posts. Nonetheless, I hope it inspires those of you much more advanced than I to try. Like I said, mouth-watering flavor! :)
Alynxia

[img width= height=]http://www.jonniemasters.com/crottin-pic.jpg[/img]
Crottin

...are small rounds of ripened goat cheese that have a pleasant, fruity flavor. Historical references to this style of cheese date back to the 16th century, but not until the early 19th were they referred to by the word 'crottin.'


INGREDIENTS:

*1 gallon goat's milk
*1/8 tsp (about 1 ml)   direct set 'Flora Danica culture.'
*1/8 tsp (about 1 g) 'Penicillium candidium.'
*1 pinch 'Geotrichium candidium.'
*2 to 3 drops liquid rennet diluted in 5 tbsp. distilled H20.
*1/8 tsp (about 1 g) Calcium Chloride diluted in 1/4 cup (about 60 ml) distilled, cool H20.


ADDITIONAL EQUIPMENT:

*4 Crottin molds
*Straw Mats
*Catch bowl for whey

YIELD:

*approx. 1 pound


Warm milk to 72 degrees F . Add starter to the milk and mix well.
Let rest for 20 minutes, keeping on the target temp. Stir in the calcium chloride and let rest 5 minutes. Now stir in the 'Geotrichium candidium' and 'Penicillin candidium.'  Add the diluted rennet, and stir for 2 minutes. Cover and keep the milk at target temperature, and let rest for 18 to 24 hours, until the curds begin to set.
Check curds for a clean break, then ladel them into the crottin molds,. Continue to fill the molds as the whey drains off and the curds will settle to the mold's bottom(s). Let them drain 24 hours, or until they pull away from the sides of the mold. Now place into a ripening box and then into cheese cave at a temp of 58 degrees F  at 85 percent humdity.  Remove the cheeses from the box every other day to remove excess moisture, and turn the rounds. They should bloom within two weeks. Continue to ripen until desired flavor.
(3 mo and up)

Note: Now I DO think I have placed incorrectly, please help out John :)

« Last Edit: January 06, 2010, 07:21:13 PM by Cheddarhead »


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Offline mtncheesemaker(Pam)

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Re: CROTTIN Recipe
« Reply #1 on: January 21, 2010, 10:10:20 AM »
Thanks for the recipe. Should they be salted at some point?
Pam

Offline Alex

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Re: CROTTIN Recipe
« Reply #2 on: January 21, 2010, 11:29:51 AM »
Pam, very legitimate question.

Alynxia, the cheeses on the pics are yours? There are no signs of white mould. I am not surprised because it seemes that you omitted the salt at all. P.Candidum needs salt to bloom. You should sprinkle salt all over the Crottins using a salt shaker (it's very convenient). Now you may expect blooming within 5 days.
Alex-The Cheesepenter

Offline mosborn

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Re: CROTTIN Recipe
« Reply #3 on: January 21, 2010, 08:52:27 PM »
Why is this cheese not Camembert?

Is it just because it's goat milk?

Doesn't the recipe seem the same?

Or did I miss the difference?
What doth life? Processing.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: CROTTIN Recipe
« Reply #4 on: January 21, 2010, 10:02:38 PM »
Is this from Tim Smiths book? It looks like the first one I tried and it is very lacking in details and didnot produce crottin more like tiny camemberts.


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Offline Alex

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Re: CROTTIN Recipe
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2010, 12:01:37 AM »
Why is this cheese not Camembert?

Is it just because it's goat milk?

Doesn't the recipe seem the same?

Or did I miss the difference?

The basic difference is in the very long coagulation time of the Crottin that anables more acidification.
Alex-The Cheesepenter

Offline iratherfly

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Re: CROTTIN Recipe
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2010, 03:19:17 AM »
Cheddarhead, have you tried it? How did it compare with the French Crottin from the store?

Crottin is a lactic cheese so no rennet like in Camembert or Brie, but I too was quite surprise to see Flora Danica and Geo/P.C in Tim Smith's recipe. Francois was kind to put out a Crottin recipe (I think it was December?) that seems like the real deal from the French cheesemakers. It calls for PLA culture which I just received yesterday so I am going to try this. I have been tasting a variety of Crottins since last month to be able to make this right. I love that this is a cheese that you can eat as early as 2-3 days into the process and it's so small that you can make a large enough batch to taste one daily until it reaches 21 day "affine".
Huh, a busy weekend ahead. Somebody wake up the goats of Vermont, I need this milk in my local Whole Foods by Saturday :)