Author Topic: Cheese #1 - Farmhouse Cheddar #1  (Read 1932 times)

Offline Deb

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Cheese #1 - Farmhouse Cheddar #1
« on: January 09, 2010, 07:44:30 PM »
Made this 4 weeks ago and cut open to try today.  Definate room for improvement but happy with first results.  As I expected it was very mild.  Moist but very slightly chalky. 

Used the Farmhouse Cheddar recipe from Home Cheese Making with supermarket milk




I made the same recipe 2 weeks ago but with raw milk, cut a small piece off to try for comparison - much better flavor. 




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Offline Likesspace

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Re: Cheese #1 - Farmhouse Cheddar #1
« Reply #1 on: January 09, 2010, 08:03:26 PM »
Deb..
If that is your first cheese you are off to a MUCH better start than I ever dreamed of! Great job.
I don't know if you use a Ph meter or not, but I would recommend getting one.
You stated that the cheese was a little bit chalky and this could be due to too low of a final Ph in your cheese.
Cheddar, (in any variety) is a VERY tough cheese and from appearance, you've done a great job. I'm certain that with a Ph meter you could take this cheese to the next level and turn out something that is truly commercial quality.
I'm not dissing your effort in any way shape or form. For a first cheese, this is absolutely fantastic! I wish I would have given such attention to detail, to create this kind of example, when first starting out.
I'm simply trying to give someone a bit of advice, that shows such great promise.

Dave

Offline Deb

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Re: Cheese #1 - Farmhouse Cheddar #1
« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2010, 08:22:38 PM »
Thanks Dave

I don't a Ph meter yet.  I have been reading the recent threads and have been thinking about getting one. 

Offline Likesspace

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Re: Cheese #1 - Farmhouse Cheddar #1
« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2010, 08:45:30 PM »
Deb, first of all you're welcome. You deserve the compliment.....
As for a Ph meter, I would recommend buying this piece of equipment over any other piece, beyond the basic necessities.
In fact I actually consider a meter to be a necessary piece of cheese making equipment.
I think Wayne said it best....
You don't heat your milk according to a certain amount of time. You use a thermometer.
In the same way you cannot expect to hit a certain Ph marker simply by cooking or stirring for "so long". Instead you need to be able to gauge what is happening with the cheese over a certain time period.
If you check on Ebay you can find a Hanna Checker model for about $28.00, shipped. This is the lowest price I've found and this particular meter has served me well for the last two years.
I sincerely hope this information helps.
Once you get a meter there are many members that can explain how to use it and what to watch for, (what markers to hit), during a make.

Dave

Offline Pavel

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Re: Cheese #1 - Farmhouse Cheddar #1
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2010, 09:01:36 PM »
Congrats with your cheese Deb!
I almost feel from here your happiness :) and the cheese do looks very good.
I'm after Dave, cheddar was the first cheese made me think about pH meter. And i've bought one. But here Hanna Checker's price is $75 >:(
« Last Edit: January 09, 2010, 09:17:22 PM by Pavel »


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Offline Deb

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Re: Cheese #1 - Farmhouse Cheddar #1
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2010, 09:04:32 PM »
Thanks Pavel!

Dave,


I think Wayne said it best....
You don't heat your milk according to a certain amount of time. You use a thermometer.
In the same way you cannot expect to hit a certain Ph marker simply by cooking or stirring for "so long". Instead you need to be able to gauge what is happening with the cheese over a certain time period.


Dave

I get this,  I bake - an hour of rising in my kitchen is not likely to be the same as an hour of rising in your kitchen  :D , time is only a rough guide

Thanks for the ebay/ph meter info

Thank you!

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Cheese #1 - Farmhouse Cheddar #1
« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2010, 09:29:06 PM »
Great job Deb!

Did you use Calcium Chloride? Sometimes to much of that can also add a chalky flavor. Sometimes it will go away with a bit more aging too. Looks really good! Raw milk defiately has a better flavor, creamier texture, and smoother mouth feel.

Offline FarmerJD

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Re: Cheese #1 - Farmhouse Cheddar #1
« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2010, 10:50:30 PM »
Great job, Deb! Looks great!


Pavel, did you say you got a ph meter??????? :o  I must have missed that. You almost had me thinking of giving up on rennet. :)  I guess we all affect each other. Good luck with cheddar!

Offline Pavel

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Re: Cheese #1 - Farmhouse Cheddar #1
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2010, 01:47:41 AM »
Yes Farmer, i got that meter ;D One of each three Cheddars i make turn out crumbly. I think i'd better have thee of three with propper structure :)
BTW about rennet. Would you like to chime in this thread again? http://cheeseforum.org/forum/index.php/topic,2266.0.html

Offline Deb

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Re: Cheese #1 - Farmhouse Cheddar #1
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2010, 05:37:52 AM »
Great job Deb!

Did you use Calcium Chloride? Sometimes to much of that can also add a chalky flavor. Sometimes it will go away with a bit more aging too. Looks really good! Raw milk defiately has a better flavor, creamier texture, and smoother mouth feel.

I did use Calcium Chloride in this one.   If I do another with store milk I'll reduce the amount a little.  Based on what I have tasted so far though I think I will be using raw as much as possible. 

Right now the cheapest I can find raw is $4.50 a half gallon, though I need to check one more place.    Debi - are you paying less over there?  My parents can get for 4.50/gallon in NH and I might need to have them come visit more often  :D   

I need to get a setup to do more though ,   I have a 12 qt pot and started with 2 gallons but can do 3.  I want to do bigger already ;D  I need to go back through the threads & look at Debi's setup.  I have a PID for my smoker that I think I can get a sous vide probe for that might work & help with the temp control in that type of setup. 
« Last Edit: January 10, 2010, 05:45:32 AM by Deb »


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Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Cheese #1 - Farmhouse Cheddar #1
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2010, 10:53:47 AM »
$4.50 is a good price for raw milk.

Farmhouse Cheddar is MUCH better quality aged over 60 days. I've cut a few at 30 days and they always seem chalky and a little sour. I've put them back into the cave to age a little more and they turn out fine.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Cheese #1 - Farmhouse Cheddar #1
« Reply #11 on: January 10, 2010, 11:03:55 AM »
Deb -

I have one farmer that sells raw milk for $6 a gallon in Bozrah. It is not Jersy milk but very good none the less. My supplier for the Jersy milk in Canterbury has found commercial buyers so that is now $6.50 per half gallon plus $2 bottle deposit in the local organic shops. Way out of my budget! Wonderful milk though - about 3/8 of the bottle is creamline and easy to see. The other milk is harder for me to see so stealing the cream is a PITA.

There are several farms down the coast more toward you (I think) listed on the Real milk site:

http://www.realmilk.com/where1.html#ct

Most are pricey here.