Author Topic: I tried making the Cahil Style Cheddars today - Port and Porter  (Read 1576 times)

Offline DeejayDebi

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I tried making the Cahil Style Cheddars today - Port and Porter
« on: January 16, 2010, 11:06:55 PM »
I tried making the Cahil Style Cheddars today - Port and Porter according to the recipe in the 1910 Fancy Cheese in America book in the Library.

Due to being limited to one vat I opted for adding the coloring to the curds just prior to milling.

I made a Port Wine cheddar and a Porter Beer cheddar. One forth of the curds are supposed to be mixed with 2.5 ml vegetable food coloring first then  added to the base of the cheese, then flavored with the spice, wine or beer. Well the vegetable coloring is wickedly expensive $18 for 3 tiny little bottles so I mixed a few drops of it with 1/4 cup of water like amatto and added a few drops of vinegar to help set it.

Here is the port wine I used and coloring I mixed. I actually like the wine pretty much. Not to sweet and not to dry.




Here is the porter I used and coloring I mixed. Brown is a very tricky color to mix. It wanted to go either purple or red.




and here are the cheeses after the first 15 minutes in the press. It'll ge a bit darker as it drys and ages.



Over all I think it worked pretty well.  I know now not to be afraid to use to much of the coloring. It's not as strong as amatto chesse coloring. I used about 8 drops of the red and it's not really dark.

I did have to chop up and re-mill the port cheddar I was so busy trying to dye the curds I forgot the salt.

Thought you might want to see the cheese chopped in half after only 15 minutes in the press (under the tomato can) I was amazed at how well the curds where meshed so quickly. Never cut one ope this quick.

« Last Edit: January 16, 2010, 11:12:12 PM by DeejayDebi »


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Offline mtncheesemaker(Pam)

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Re: I tried making the Cahil Style Cheddars today - Port and Porter
« Reply #1 on: January 17, 2010, 10:06:08 AM »
Look good, Debi.
How and how much of the booze did you add for flavoring? Same as when you added the color?
Pam

Offline Alex

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Re: I tried making the Cahil Style Cheddars today - Port and Porter
« Reply #2 on: January 17, 2010, 12:15:23 PM »
You make very interresting cheeses Debi. Is the recipe relying on a basic Cheddar?
Alex-The Cheesepenter

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: I tried making the Cahil Style Cheddars today - Port and Porter
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2010, 01:13:22 PM »
Pam -

I did pour about 1 cup of warmed wine over the curds and 1 cup of warmed porter over the other. I armed them both to 80°F or 27°C the ideal temperature for pressing curds. I didn't want the cold booze to chill the curds and keep them from melding as my kitchen temperature was 64°F that would have been to cold.

One thing I discovered is that food coloring is very thin compared to amatto. I thought with all the dye I used these things would glow in the dark but they did not color as dark as expected. I do know they will darken some with aging.

Alex -
This is the recipe I used - a basic cheddar with a twist. I colored the curds in the final phase of cheddaring just prior to milling. While I played with the coloring I left the stacks in the vat and kept flipping as normal. There was still a good bit of whey in the curds - much more than I had dye. I think that watered it down a good bit too.


Cahill Type Sage, Porter or Wine Cheese - English

Cahill Type Cheeses are simply english cheddar cheeses where 1/4 of the the total amount of the curds are either cooked separately in a vegetable based food coloring similar to using ammatto.
OR
Take 1/4 the total amount of you curds just prior to salting and add 2.75 ml of vegetable based food coloring.
The color is based on the type of cheese. Green for sage,  Brown for porter, Red for wine.
The flavor (Sage flavoring extract, Porter or Wine) is then sprayed on the curds just prior to pressing.
This can also be done with a Derby cheese.

The Cheedar
Ingredients:
whole milk
choozit MA011 starter culture
rennet
kosher salt
vegetable based food coloring

Procedure
Heat milk to 88° F
Add calicium chlride if needed
Add 1/2 teaspoon Choozit MA11  starter culture
Ripen with culture for 1 1/2 hours
Add 1/2 teaspoon double strength vegetable rennet
Check for the curdling time and multiply this times 3 to get the time from adding rennet to cutting the curd, e.g. 12 min. x 3 = 36 min.
Cut into 3/8” cubes (pea-sized particles)
Settle curds after cutting for 5 minutes
Stir and heat curds to 95 °F in 30 minutes ( 1° F every 4 minutes)
Continue stirring and heating to 102° F in 15 minutes (1° F every 2 minutes)
Cook at 102° F for 45-60 minutes until the curds bounce off your hand and feel like pellets and are springy when squeezed. Whey pH 6.1-6.2
Settle curds under the whey for 15 minutes.
Move curds slowly to the back of the vat to form a pack that is 8 inches deep.
Drain off the whey and form a trench in the middle of the pack to let the whey escape from the curds. When you are finished draining, there should be two packs of curds on either side of the back of the vat with an 8-10 inch wide trench down the middle. The pack should be about 4 inches deep.
Whey pH 5.9-6.0 by the time the pack is formed and most of the whey is drained.

Cheddaring Process:
Wait ten minutes and cut the pack into slabs that are 6 inches wide.
Turn the slabs over after 15 minutes. Turn again after 15 minutes.
Cut the slabs to half their length and pile them 2 high.
Turn the slabs over and pile 3 high after 15 minutes,
Continue to turn and pile the slabs every 15 minutes up to 7 high if you need to keep moisture in the curds or 4-5 high if you need less moisture.
Maintain the temperature at 95-100° F during the cheddaring process. This can be checked by sticking a thermometer into the slabs of curd.
When the whey is pH 5.3-5.4 (acidity of 55-75 degrees), mill the slabs of curd into pieces 1 inch x 2 inches.
Time from adding culture to milling is around 6-6 1/2 hours.
Wait ten minutes and add salt. Use coarse flake salt (like Kosher salt)  Salt amount will vary with cheese yield. Expect to use about 2 teaspoons per gallon of milk.
Add the salt in 3 portions and wait 5-10 minutes between each addition. The idea is to let enough salt dissolve into the curds before hooping the curds and pressing them into blocks or wheels. However for smaller batches, two applications will be enough.
Gather the curds into the forms (blocks or hoops) lined with cheese cloth and move to the press.
Press with enough pressure to create a smooth rind by the next morning. This is 25 p.s.i. to start. After 30 minutes take of the pressure and tighten the cheese cloths around the cheese. Increase the pressure to 40 p.s.i. for the rest of the time. The pressure in hoops should be continuous for 24 to 48 hours.
Remove from the press and take the cheese out of the forms. The cheeses can be vacuum sealed or waxed. If muslin cheese cloth is used, it can be left on the rind and waxed over.
Ripening Process -  Sage cheese can be ripened in an ordinary celar or cool room where the temperature does not go above 60°F. It should be held until ie developed the pronounced flavor that is characteristic of the cheese.

Up to the time of milling the process is similar to that of cheddar cheese. The method I usually followed is to divid the milk. Placing about 1/4 in a smal vat to which is added green veggetable coloring matter at the rate of 12 ounces  for 1,000 pounds of milk. The balance of the milk is handled without being colored. When the whey is removed, the colored curd is evenly mixed with the uncolored curds to produce the desired mottled appearence. (This result can also be accomplished without dividing milk by treating the coloring matter just before salting.) Before pressing, sage flavoring-extract is sprayed over the curd. When finished, the cheese should present a uniformly green mottled appearence.
Pressing cheese. The regular sized Enlish sage cheese weights about 5 pounds, but in America all sizes are found, weighing from 2 to 80 pounds. The pressure in hoops should be continuous for 24 to 48 hours.
Ripening Process -  Sage cheese can be ripened in an ordinary celar or cool room where the temperature does not go above 60°F. It should be held until ie developed the pronounced flavor that is characteristic of the cheese.

More pictures:
« Last Edit: January 17, 2010, 01:18:52 PM by DeejayDebi »

Offline Likesspace

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Re: I tried making the Cahil Style Cheddars today - Port and Porter
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2010, 02:00:16 PM »
Debi...
Those look fantastic! Great job!

Dave


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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: I tried making the Cahil Style Cheddars today - Port and Porter
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2010, 07:40:13 PM »
Thanks Dave I think I got a little carried away chopping the curds though I was in a hurry and some got a bit small. Tasted good though ... squeak squeak squeak ...  ;D

Offline Brie

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Re: I tried making the Cahil Style Cheddars today - Port and Porter
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2010, 08:33:21 PM »
Deb, you are always on top of everything--I have appreciated your efforts and input for several months. Looking forward to the results of your latest effort.
Christine
Darn, another cheese meltdown--ahh, perfect fondue.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: I tried making the Cahil Style Cheddars today - Port and Porter
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2010, 08:54:47 PM »
Thank you Christine. I try to show that somethings are easier than they look.

Offline mightyjesse

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Re: I tried making the Cahil Style Cheddars today - Port and Porter
« Reply #8 on: January 22, 2010, 04:57:23 PM »
Thanks for doing the legwork on this. I've been DYING to make these, and have even made several attempts. The coloring issue was what continued to allude me. Is there a reason why you use vegetable food dyes instead of just getting whatever had the longest shelf life? I don't doubt that the vegetable version is better for me, but if I'm going to experiment, I'd like to start with a $4 experiment and not a $20 experiment...

I know... commitment issues...

Offline Alex

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Re: I tried making the Cahil Style Cheddars today - Port and Porter
« Reply #9 on: January 23, 2010, 01:25:18 AM »
mightyjesse,

you can use selfmade  coloring agents like beetroot and spinach juice for cheese as well as for home made pasta. 
Alex-The Cheesepenter


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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: I tried making the Cahil Style Cheddars today - Port and Porter
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2010, 11:13:05 PM »
Yes I agree with Alex.  My first inclination was to use beets and beet greens but I didn't know if it would impart the flavor as well. I even bought fresh beets for that purpose, but I chickened out and bought the veggie dye. Next time I use beets!

I used vegetable coloring because I read that you should only use veggetable based coloring in the book I got the basic recipe from. I couldn't mix a decent brown though.

Offline mightyjesse

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Re: I tried making the Cahil Style Cheddars today - Port and Porter
« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2010, 11:31:57 PM »
I just did a farmhouse style cheddar mixing 1/4 of the curds with sage, pepper, and green food coloring I have in the kitchen for cookie icing... I'll let you know how it turns out... I added the coloring to the milk at the rennetting phase, so the curds themselves were very green - not just coated in green. Looked like play-doh. I'll take pictures once it's out of the press.

Offline iratherfly

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Re: I tried making the Cahil Style Cheddars today - Port and Porter
« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2010, 03:32:31 AM »
This looks fantastic. I am thinking of trying this on my next cheddar - with Beet juice for color. Tea may also work out with its deep brown tannic acid. I think I will finish a standard 2 stage milling and knotting (cheddaring) process and then do one extra cycle with extra large curds where I will add the color, so I get a few thick color veins instead of many thin ones.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: I tried making the Cahil Style Cheddars today - Port and Porter
« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2010, 06:23:28 PM »
Sage makes for a geat color Jessie can't wait to see it.


Yeah definately go with the beet juice. I made soup with my beets and it's stains everything the perfect color!