Author Topic: Blueberry Stilton  (Read 3039 times)

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Blueberry Stilton
« on: February 21, 2010, 04:40:19 PM »
My Blueberry Emmental from a few months back was a huge failure so I was absolutely thrilled with a 103 day old Blueberry Stilton that I cut on February 13th.

My wife prefers a mild blue flavor, so I let the blue mold do it's thing for about 3 weeks and then vac-bag to cut off oxygen to the mold. The surface mold dies off quickly and creates the look that you see on the rind - VERY edible by the way. I do puncture the cheese while the mold is active, so there is plenty of blue flavor inside.

I used the same brand of dehydrated blueberries as I used on the Emmental. So from observation, I would suggest that dehydrated fruits should only be used with cheeses that are salted prior to pressing. Without the salt, the fruit is simply going to rehydrate and ferment. It MAY be possible to brine the fruit itself before adding to a non-salted cheese like an Emmental. I'll have to try that sometime.

Can't wait to see how the Raspberry Stilton and Crystallized Ginger Stilton in the cave turn out. ;D

Anyway, here are some pics.

A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com


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Offline SueVT

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Re: Blueberry Stilton
« Reply #1 on: February 21, 2010, 08:55:53 PM »
Oh!
This looks So Good!!!   I love Stilton!
Sue

Offline Ben

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Re: Blueberry Stilton
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2010, 01:14:19 AM »
Sailor,

I just asked you how these turned out on your original post before seeing this.  I am glad to see it worked out well.  I am interested in the ginger one because I am thinking of using candied and dried orange peel.  Not sure how that will go over but I think it sounds good.  Have you posted this recipe anywhere?  If not would you put it here?

Offline Cheesetart

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Re: Blueberry Stilton
« Reply #3 on: February 24, 2010, 06:33:53 AM »
I'd love to try making this on Saturday -- so the recipe and/or any additional tips/pointers would really be appreciated!  Yours looks great -- hope mine turns out similar!
Happy Cheesemaking!
Dee

Offline Alex

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Re: Blueberry Stilton
« Reply #4 on: February 24, 2010, 12:19:13 PM »
Sailor, this is a very professional looking cheese. I hope it tastes at least as it looks. Bon Apetit.
Alex-The Cheesepenter


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Offline John (CH)

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Re: Blueberry Stilton
« Reply #5 on: February 24, 2010, 06:03:23 PM »
Sailor, you should be a proud Papa, gorgeous looking cheese.

I was in local SamsClub Store tonight and to my surprise, snap, Blueberry Stilton! Already too much cheese in fridges and didn't have a camera but the Dairy was called Clawson and the package said Dried Sweetened Blueberries, didn't mention Wild Blueberries like in the attached PDF downloaded from their website.

Again, beautiful cheese!

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Blueberry Stilton
« Reply #6 on: February 24, 2010, 09:02:30 PM »
Sailor that is one great looking cheese!

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Blueberry Stilton
« Reply #7 on: February 24, 2010, 09:18:00 PM »
John, I could be wrong, but that looks like a reprocessed cheese because the blueberries haven't "bled" very much into the body of the cheese. If you look at mine, the blueberries bled almost 2 inches in several spots during rehydration. I suspect that many, if not most fruity cheeses are made by mixing an aged cheese with fruit and then repressing. If you look at their label, it has added fructose. Because of fermentation problems, I can't imagine that they would add fructose prior to aging.

WHITE Stilton - what a waste. A Blue that could have been. ;)
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Offline Brie

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Re: Blueberry Stilton
« Reply #8 on: February 25, 2010, 08:20:04 PM »
I've been waiting for you to crack this cheese! Just a check to make certain--did you make this as a white stilton or blue?
Darn, another cheese meltdown--ahh, perfect fondue.

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Blueberry Stilton
« Reply #9 on: February 25, 2010, 10:56:05 PM »
Definitely Blue.

To me, a Stilton is blue by definition. A White Stilton, with no blue mold should be called something else.

Yes, Alex, the flavor is superb. Can;t wait to try the cranberry & the ginger.\
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com


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Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Blueberry Stilton
« Reply #10 on: February 25, 2010, 11:18:54 PM »
Ben & Dee,

There are several Stilton recipes that work just fine, but the whole point of a Stilton is the way that you treat it after the initial make.

Here is a fairly good explanation from Ricki Carroll's website :

Making Stilton

The real difference is the addition of the dehydrated blueberries. With Stilton, you do a VERY light pressing overnight, mill into 1" cubes and then salt. THAT's when you add the fruit, not before. I believe the salt is critical to inhibiting fermentation, which produces alcohol and ruins the cheese.

I used 3.5 ounces of dehydrated blueberries in a 4 gallon batch. Next time, I will double that amount. Fresh blueberries MIGHT work in the salted environment, but I would definitely blanch them first. Or you could do a vinegar (acidic) wash to help preserve the skins. I have even thought about a quick dip in Star San to kill off any surface yeast. I am going to try all 3 techniques in the next few weeks.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Offline linuxboy

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Re: Blueberry Stilton
« Reply #11 on: February 26, 2010, 12:16:41 AM »
Sailor, whenever I have tried fresh fruit, it's never worked out. The fruit would dry up a little and leave pools of liquid around it, or separate from the curd, or cause off flavors. My solution to fresh fruit in cheese is to soak in a solution of heavy citric acid (8-10 TBsp per gallon) and a little metabisulfite (Kmeta, 10-20 PPM, just very little, maybe 1/8 tsp per gallon), then dehydrate at a lower temp in the Excalibur, around 110F. I watch the dehydration and stop it when the fruit is dry, but still has moisture inside. For blueberries, it produces this fruit that still has juice inside, and a slightly leathery skin. Then I use that in the cheese, same as you, after/at salting. The cheese will rehydrate the fruit a little and when you slice the cheese, it all works together.

Curious to see how your experiments come out. I haven't really tried any other ways because I'm paranoid about moisture and yeasts/acetobacter contaminating the fruit.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2010, 12:23:28 AM by linuxboy »
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Blueberry Stilton
« Reply #12 on: February 26, 2010, 08:55:31 PM »
Just thinking out loud.

Technically, the interior of fruit is sterile (just like a hen's egg is sterile). And dehydrating at 110F is not hot enough to kill off microbial contaminants (especially spore formers) inside the fruit. So it seems that a thorough surface decontamination should do the trick. Citric Acid with MetaB makes much more sense than vinegar. I do believe that a Star San soaking and brine rinse might work well too.

Another problem is mechanical, not microbial. Whole blueberries will probably just burst under even modest pressure. So a Cheddar or Emmental made with fresh blueberries is probably impossible. An unpressed Stilton with pretreated fruit might work.

Even with dehydrated fruit, my Blueberry Emmental was a disaster. I attribute that to the fact that Emmental is not a curd salted cheese. So I'm thinking why not presoak the dehydrated blueberries in a pH balanced saturated brine? Don't want them to rehydrate though.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Offline Brie

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Re: Blueberry Stilton
« Reply #13 on: February 26, 2010, 09:42:02 PM »
Thanks, Sailor--I am definitely interested in making this cheese. I've seen white stiltons with blueberries in the market; yet not blue stilton with blueberries--you definitely have the blues down--you are the BB King of the cheese world!
Darn, another cheese meltdown--ahh, perfect fondue.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Blueberry Stilton
« Reply #14 on: February 27, 2010, 01:07:50 PM »
I have a question. You said White Stilton does not have mold? Does that mean none at all or just no blue mold? I can apparently eat/touch the white Geo molds and the red smear molds but the greens and molds itch me to death.

I am wondering if I could handle a white stilton and if so how is it made?