Author Topic: Kosher Cheese - Does anyone have any recommendations?  (Read 1693 times)

Offline smelly

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Kosher Cheese - Does anyone have any recommendations?
« on: August 11, 2008, 03:56:46 PM »
I'm looking for Kosher cheeses that are hard...
Rennet is not a kosher ingredient so I'm wondering about alternatives to Rennet. 
Thanks!  :)
Smelly's Mom

Offline Tea

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Re: Kosher Cheese - Does anyone have any recommendations?
« Reply #1 on: August 11, 2008, 04:37:45 PM »
Hi Smelly's mom.  There are different rennets.  The one that I use is a plant rennet not animal.  Would that make a difference for you?
Or are you looking to purchase, not make?

Offline John (CH)

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Re: Kosher Cheese - Does anyone have any recommendations?
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2008, 09:51:42 PM »
Hi Smelly's Mum

Good question. Rennet is the slang word used in cheesemaking for the historical coagulant which indeed was made from animals stomach. The key component being Chymosin, which has been isolated and re-created using non-animal based microbial processes. I've built a short info page on it here. My understanding is that most manufactured cheese today is made using this manufactured product.

Many cheese manufacturers websites have info on the type of the coagulant / rennet they use.

I guess a good question is if this modern genetically engineered product could be considered kosher, I expect there are varying opinions within the Jewish religion.

If you are making cheese I also initially used a Vegetarian Rennet from Whole Foods Stores chain in USA/Canada, picture on that webpage.

I expect there are many more info sources on the web, good luck!

Offline Bee

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Re: Kosher Cheese - Does anyone have any recommendations?
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2008, 01:22:25 PM »
Hi there,

LYSOLAC is approved for use in Kosher foods.  If you wish to save your cheese against spoilage from bacteria created by Clostridia tyrobutyricum spores in the milk (what a mouthful eh?) which is very common in milk and causes the hard or semi hard cheeses to 'blow' (slits, irregular bubbles and spoiled taste etc) about 6 weeks into aging, you can use LYSOLAC, made of 100% pure and natural Lysozyme.

see www.lysolac.com.  It only costs around 2 cents per pound to protect it...stays in the cheese for years! 

Happy cheesemaking!

Offline smelly

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Re: Kosher Cheese - Does anyone have any recommendations?
« Reply #4 on: November 21, 2008, 11:17:28 AM »
Thank you so much Bee!  I will let my mom know!!

Offline marygoit

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Lysolac
« Reply #5 on: November 06, 2015, 11:34:56 AM »
I work for a small cheese creamery start up - we have recently learned about the benefits of Lysolac and will be using it in our Gruyere.   I now need to find the labeling regulations for it - does anyone know what they are or how to track them down? Thank you!

Offline Al Lewis

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Re: Kosher Cheese - Does anyone have any recommendations?
« Reply #6 on: November 06, 2015, 02:46:30 PM »
Isn't vegetable rennet kosher?
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Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Lysolac
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2015, 04:24:34 PM »
I work for a small cheese creamery start up - we have recently learned about the benefits of Lysolac and will be using it in our Gruyere.   I now need to find the labeling regulations for it - does anyone know what they are or how to track them down? Thank you!

You should discuss this with your state inspector. However, Lysolac is a well established "natural" product. In fact 99% of Italian Grana Padano and 85% of France's hard cheese industry uses Lysolac. Lysolin (same thing) is very common in the wine industry. The active ingredient, Lysozyme is naturally present in (and can be isolated from) Mothers milk, tears, saliva, and even cauliflower juice, but the most important source from which Lysozyme can be extracted on an industrial scale is chicken albumen. As such, it is not generally labeled an an antibiotic.
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