Author Topic: First batch of crottin  (Read 1113 times)

Offline Oberhasli

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First batch of crottin
« on: March 21, 2010, 03:33:21 PM »
I have a batch of goat milk crottin aging in the basement.  What am I looking for here to let me know it is ready to be moved to the refrigerator.  Should I be waiting for a nice overall bloom like on camembert?  Some of the crottin's I made are too big (tall).  I haven't quite perfected how much to put in the moulds and how often to refill after the curds have drained.   Obviously, I overdid it on this batch.  But, they have been rolled in kosher salt and are beginning to get a white bloom.  I don't want to get to the point of no return where they are too done before I move them to the fridge.  Any suggestions?
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Offline Oberhasli

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Re: First batch of crottin
« Reply #1 on: March 25, 2010, 06:04:44 PM »
Well, I moved the crottins to the fridge, but I'm not too sure about them.  I ate one yesterday.  I had a mild ammonia smell when I first cut into it, but it tasted good.  The crottin I have seen pictures of always looks like a hard little button.  I don't think the ones I made would ever get to that stage before they dissolved.  I was trying to perfect this cheese to bring to farmer's market in the summer.  I have had good success with camembert,  but I'm not sure this one would go over so well.   Sometimes with new cheeses it is like trying to sell ice cubes to the Eskimos.  Most people around here are used to yellow Kraft slices or yellow rubber cheddar. 

I may just give up on this one.
Better to train people and risk they leave,
than do nothing and risk they stay.     Anonymous

Offline Majoofi

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Re: First batch of crottin
« Reply #2 on: March 25, 2010, 10:37:45 PM »
well you may have to give away lots of samples to get them hooked.

Offline MarkShelton

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Re: First batch of crottin
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2010, 07:24:45 AM »
I know if you sent me one, I'd sing the praises of your cheeses!  ;)
I am constantly in awe of the very first people that consumed these things, despite how funky looking and smelling they had become.

Offline Oberhasli

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Re: First batch of crottin
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2010, 05:46:17 PM »
Thanks Mark.  I gave some to friends today to get some feedback.  I polished off the one I had started on.  I thought is was yummy.  One of my wimpier friends had one yesterday and said she ate it but took the rind off because she didn't like the smell.  Hurumph!  The rind is some of the best stuff!  Oh well, I did ask for feedback.  But, I am debating whether I want to make more.  It does seem pretty temperamental to make and has a shorter ripening window that the camembert does.  It makes sense  I guess since they are smaller.  I will ponder the matter over some wine and cheese! 
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than do nothing and risk they stay.     Anonymous


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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: First batch of crottin
« Reply #5 on: March 26, 2010, 11:58:14 PM »
I don't like the rinds either.

Offline Oberhasli

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Re: First batch of crottin
« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2010, 10:46:20 AM »
Well, the little crottins are all gone - eaten up by my friends - rinds and all.  I enjoyed them, but I don't feel as confident about making them as I do with camembert.  They are definitely challenging.   I may try again before summer comes to make them again. 

DeeJayDebi - I love the rinds, but I have seen people painstakingly peel the rind off of brie and camembert.  I think some think it is some sort of plastic cover.  I think if you are caught peeling rind off a cheese in France, it is a guillotinable (is that a word?) offense :-).  But, to each their own!
Better to train people and risk they leave,
than do nothing and risk they stay.     Anonymous