Author Topic: Beaufort Recipe  (Read 6930 times)

Offline Sailor Con Queso

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Posts: 2,522
  • Cheeses: 125
    • Boone Creek Creamery
Beaufort Recipe
« on: March 31, 2010, 10:45:35 PM »
I have made several of these lately so they can start aging (one tonight in fact). This is similar to Gruyere but has a much more complex bacterial mix and pH targets are a little more acidic because of the addition of the Meso culture. It is scalded to a higher temperature and is allowed to sit for 24 hours before brining. Traditional Beaufort is not very common in the marketplace. If you like Gruyere, you'll LOVE Beaufort.

Alpine Beaufort

5 gallons of whole milk heated to 90F

Starter Cultures:

Mesophilic  - MA011 (1/8 tsp). This develops the initial acidity at the lower ripening temperatures.

Thermophilic  - TA061 (dash - 1/16 tsp). This will develop acidity at the higher temperatures and during early pressing

Thermophilic (Helveticus)  - LH 100 (2 pinch – 1/12 tsp). Enhances proteolysis (protein breakdown) during aging to help create that fabulous Alpine texture.

Propionic shermanii (1 pinch – 1/24 tsp). Personal preference. This is one of the “tricks” to a good Gruyere.

Ripen for 30 min. at 90F

Rennet: 1/2 tsp. of single strength calf rennet. Adjust as necessary to achieve flocculation at 10-15 minutes. Floc multiplier is 3. So let it sit for 30 to 45 minutes or until a clean break is achieved.

Cut: Initially cut curd into 1 inch cubes, rest for 3 minutes, then cut to 1/4 inch. Let heal for 10 minutes.

NOTE – The small curd is typical of the thermophylic long aged Alpine cheeses as well as the Parma style cheeses of Italy. This encourages whey release and a drier curd.

Cook: Heat curds slowly to 128F over 40 minutes.

Prepress: Press under whey or “In The Pot” for 30 minutes with 20 pounds for better curd consolidation. Flip and repeat.

Pressing: Move cheese to regular press and gradually increase weight to 2-3 psi. Continue pressing overnight. As the acidity continues to develop, the curd can aggressively stick to the cheesecloth. To avoid this, soak the cheesecloth in acidified whey (or vinegar) with a little calcium cloride added. Resoak after each flip.

Salting: Remove from press, but keep cheese in the hoop. Allow unweighted cheese to cool and rest for 24 hours. Remove from hoop and brine for 6-8 hrs.

Aging: 80% RH at 52-54F. This is traditionaly a washed rind cheese. In about 7-10 days surface molds will start to develop. This needs to be wiped down with a saturated brine at 3-6 day intervals to start. Traditionaly the surface of large Beauforts is sprinkled with salt and allowed to develop its own brine. This is rubbed into the surface the following day, the cheese is turned, and the cycle repeated. A red rind will form in time and will require less frequent treatments.

Age for 6 -18 months depending on the flavor desired.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,986
  • Cheeses: 198
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Re: Beaufort Recipe
« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2010, 10:45:12 PM »
Brilliant recipe, Sailor. I'll try to make one your way vs my regular make and see how it turns out. A lot of similarities between our two styles.

My notes on this are to cook hot, but to use little rennet, with a 3x multiplier. Traditional French recipe is to use European calf rennet, which is 1:10,000 strength, at 7-10 ml per 100 lbs milk. This gives you a longer floc time of 15-25 mins, and then a 3x multiplier gives 45-60 mins rest before cutting.

My aging notes say 85-88 RH, so a little higher than yours.
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline Sailor Con Queso

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Posts: 2,522
  • Cheeses: 125
    • Boone Creek Creamery
Re: Beaufort Recipe
« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2010, 11:57:21 PM »
I have just one obscure Beaufort recipe that I have modified to my style & taste. So I have been looking for another traditional recipe for comparison. Does your recipe use a Meso/Thermo mix?

I use pH targets .1 less than Gruyere because of the starter mix. I don't know about yours, but this cheese really cranks up the acid production about 2-3 hours into pressing. It is the most aggressive cheese that I have made and will stick like crazy to cheesecloth or a Kadova mold if you don't manage things properly.

Actually, my notes call for a RH of at LEAST 80%.

A couple of sources that I have read recently suggest that a longer floc time produces a firmer and more stable curd. Just from observation, I have to agree. I usually shoot for around 10 minutes to floc, but the curd seems much stronger if I use just a "little" less rennet and extend the set time. This has been particularly evident with the Holstein milk that I have been using lately.

I actually saw another reference to 25-30 minutes floc times for Beaufort. What's your take on longer floc times? Does the theoretical chemistry actually support a stronger curd set? Is there a practical reason to use short floc times for some cheeses and longer times for others? My initial thought is that an extended floc/curd set time is going to allow more acid to develop. In some cases that could really change the timing for pH targets. It might be necessary to cook faster before too much acid develops. Maybe that's what you meant by cooking hot?

A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,986
  • Cheeses: 198
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Re: Beaufort Recipe
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2010, 06:00:16 PM »
Keep meaning to answer this, finally have a few mins. Traditional Beaufort is very similar to emmenthaler, except it uses less propionic, doesn't have a warm aging for the eyes, and has more salt and different culture. Also the ST strains seem to differ. Emmenthaler will drop pH pretty quickly in 6 hours, and beaufort will still be at 6 or so after 6 hours, then drop quickly.

My target ph for the culture is to hit 5.9 after 6 hours, and then the acidity should spike and after 8 hours be at 5.3-5.4, and ready for brining. So similar to yours, that little bit amount of ST kicks in later on in the make. The culture should be predominantly LH, with various naturally occurring strains of mesophilic. I like to add a little FD (.1-.2% bulk starter equivalent), ripen that in the milk for an hour along with the rest of the culture at 90F, and then kill it off by heating. I'm looking for the complex mix of proteases and peptidases from the cocci with that approach, and there's just enough there after heating the milk to add a little character. Sort of like adding flavoring. For acidification, the ST does most of the work. And the lactobacilli are there and keep multiplying in the aging room, then autolysing as aging progresses.

The longer floc times, I completely agree with you. Seems that by letting the milk sit undisturbed longer, the curd is better. It's not the same thing to reduce total set time and use more rennet. Might be a function of acidity because as the acidity develops, rennet is more effective. Except, in Beaufort, that acidity is like 6.3-6.4 by the time it's drained, so I'm just not sure acidity plays a big part.

Beaufort is cooked faster than other similar cheeses, from 90 all the way to 127 or so in a little more than half an hour, then cooked until the curds are the right consistency
« Last Edit: July 14, 2010, 06:06:21 PM by linuxboy »
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Online Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,165
  • Cheeses: 193
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Beaufort Recipe
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2010, 02:03:14 AM »
Trying to fine-tune my timing and pH points....

Sailor, I used your Beaufort recipe and have had the cheese under the press for 4 hours @ ~2psi. I decided to unwrap, flip, resoak the cloth, and press overnight (7 hours) @ 3.5psi. This is the second cheese using my calf rennet. I had been using the mucor miehei for all my previous makes.

I made a Gouda using 1/8tsp dry calf rennet and it took 22 min to floc. This time I used 1/4 tsp and it came in just under 15 min. Much better.

The temp was supposed to be brought up to 128F in 40 min. It took me 60 min. I've had troubles with my Extech PH100 from the get-go and today it told me "Renew". You have got to be kidding me! I haven't had it that long or used it that much. I will call them tomorrow.

I used it anyway after calibrating it. Not sure that the calibration was accurate if it's flashing "Renew", but I pressed on. When I was 20 min in to the cooking/stirring, my reading was 6.54 @ 86F. After the cooking, I loaded the curds into the mold. Per your direction, I pressed under warm whey with 10 lbs for 20 min. (Yeah, I modified that). Then I rewrapped , soaking the cloth with whey/vinegar/CACL2, and pressed under whey for another 30 min using 25 lbs. When I'd finished that, I rewrapped, soaked the cloth, flipped, and pressed with my press @ just under 2psi. I tested the whey coming out at this point and it read 4.83 @ 83.3F. Seems a tad low. At some point I'm going to get this right.

Have I created yet another acidic, crumbly cheese? I hope not. I used likesspace (Dave's) Gouda recipe and ripened for about 5 min. This Beaufort wanted 30 min, so I obliged. Is that too much ripening time given the culture mix?

By the way, the cloth really does stick to the cheese. I can't imagine what it would be like if I hadn't been soaking the cloth in the whey/vinegar/CACL2 broth.

One more thing: linuxboy, you say the LH should be the dominant culture yet this recipe by Sailor makes the meso the big player. Have you posted your Beaufort recipe on the forum anywhere?

-Boofer-
« Last Edit: August 27, 2010, 09:02:04 AM by Boofer »
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,986
  • Cheeses: 198
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Re: Beaufort Recipe
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2010, 02:14:37 AM »
When I'd finished that, I rewrapped, soaked the cloth, flipped, and pressed with my press @ just under 2psi. I tested the whey coming out at this point and it read 4.83 @ 83.3F. Seems a tad low. At some point I'm going to get this right.

Are you measuring the whey or the residual vinegar?
Quote
Have I created yet another acidic, crumbly cheese? I hope not. I used likesspace (Dave's) Gouda recipe and ripened for about 5 min.

No, you drained way too high for that.

Quote
This Beaufort wanted 30 min, so I obliged. Is that too much ripening time given the culture mix?

No, it's fine.
Quote
By the way, the cloth really does stick to the cheese. I can't imagine what it would be like if I hadn't been soaking the cloth in the whey/vinegar/CACL2 broth.

One more thing: linuxboy, you say the LH should be the dominant culture yet this recipe by Sailor makes the meso the big player. Have you posted your Beaufort recipe on the forum anywhere?

TA is the main acidifier here during cooking and after. Meso is for symbiosis and for more complex flavors. With raw milk, you wouldn't need the meso. The meso also helps with the initial pH drop.

The LH is the dominant culture, but I didn't exactly say when. What I meant is that after aging if you look, the majority of bacteria are LH. That's because LH multiplies after the cheese is in the cave.

So during the make, TA acidifies. The meso cocci add some flavor during affinage, and LH acts are the main agent that leads to flavor and paste formation. No time to post recipe right now; so much stuff is in my notes or my head, but I'm trying to go through it all. It's pretty similar to sailor's.
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline Sailor Con Queso

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Posts: 2,522
  • Cheeses: 125
    • Boone Creek Creamery
Re: Beaufort Recipe
« Reply #6 on: August 06, 2010, 11:34:56 PM »
In this case, dominant doesn't mean quantity. Both cultures are active early on and usually facilitate a faster initial pH drop. I feel that the Meso is the dominant player in the beginning, although both are working hard. However, when you heat to 128F you kill off or deactivate many of the Meso bacteria. Now the Thermo is clearly dominant and continues the acidification thru pressing and brining. Meanwhile three things happen with the Meso culture. First, there is a well documented symbiotic relationship with the Thermo that enhances the whole make process. Second - some do survive and continue doing their thing. Third, the dead ones become part of the proteolytic process much earlier than normal in the affinage process. They release enzymes and provide a complex mix of flavors to the finished cheese. This early die off and proteolysis means that the cheese will also mature faster than a pure Meso cheese. Ironically, as LB pointed out, raw milk contains natural meso bacteria anyway and is one of many reasons that raw usually produces more complex and flavorful cheese.

Some award winning Cheddars for example are quietly being made by taking advantage of the meso/thermo symbiosis to produce more complex flavors with a much shorter affinage. Imagine getting the texture and flavor of a two year old cheddar within 8 or 9 months. Makes for better cheese and a better bottom line. That's probably why you don't see any recipes or many articles talking about this. The exact culture mixes and techniques are being carefully guarded. But I'm sure LB knows...... Ta Da........ (what a segueway)......
« Last Edit: August 06, 2010, 11:44:24 PM by Sailor Con Queso »
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,986
  • Cheeses: 198
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Re: Beaufort Recipe
« Reply #7 on: August 07, 2010, 12:22:52 AM »
In this case, dominant doesn't mean quantity. Both cultures are active early on and usually facilitate a faster initial pH drop. I feel that the Meso is the dominant player in the beginning, although both are working hard. However, when you heat to 128F you kill off or deactivate many of the Meso bacteria. Now the Thermo is clearly dominant and continues the acidification thru pressing and brining. Meanwhile three things happen with the Meso culture. First, there is a well documented symbiotic relationship with the Thermo that enhances the whole make process. Second - some do survive and continue doing their thing. Third, the dead ones become part of the proteolytic process much earlier than normal in the affinage process. They release enzymes and provide a complex mix of flavors to the finished cheese. This early die off and proteolysis means that the cheese will also mature faster than a pure Meso cheese. Ironically, as LB pointed out, raw milk contains natural meso bacteria anyway and is one of many reasons that raw usually produces more complex and flavorful cheese.



It's so cool how raw milk works. For making meso cheese, there are natural non-starter lactobacilli that contribute a lot of flavor. Like try making a tomme from pasteurized and raw milk. All the additional enzymes aside, the natural lactobacilli will make it more complex. Similar for thermo cheese, only it's just like you said, the meso are cooked, most die, and add complexity.
Quote
Some award winning Cheddars for example are quietly being made by taking advantage of the meso/thermo symbiosis to produce more complex flavors with a much shorter affinage. Imagine getting the texture and flavor of a two year old cheddar within 8 or 9 months. Makes for better cheese and a better bottom line. That's probably why you don't see any recipes or many articles talking about this. The exact culture mixes and techniques are being carefully guarded. But I'm sure LB knows...... Ta Da........ (what a segueway)......

Almost all pasteurized cheddars that win prizes are manipulated. Those that aren't are a fluke or result from bribes. :) There's just no way to get complex flavor with pasteurized milk in cheddar. Maybe after a few years... It'll otherwise taste like industrial cheese. Good and tasty but not remarkable. The manipulations take all sorts of shape, most are documented, just not the exact process or quantities. You have lactic acid used as preripening agent, propionic, molds, flavor extracts, enzyme extracts, higher temp (commercial cheddar is aged at 8C), thermo adjuncts, etc are all used to manipulate flavor.

And yep, most of the tricks for commercial cheese are guarded. I understand why, but don't quite fathom it because any good researcher can reverse engineer the methods and strains. Most commonly, propionic strains or LH strains are used as easy adjuncts for flavor boosts.

I am working on a detailed howto for creating better fresh cheddar cheese curds that don't have that bland flavor most have. That's one secret everyone seems to guard, of those who are using it. I engineered it separately on my own, so there's no NDA issue.

edit: here's the howto: http://www.wacheese.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=80
« Last Edit: February 19, 2011, 04:59:46 PM by linuxboy »
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Online Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,165
  • Cheeses: 193
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Beaufort Recipe
« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2010, 08:52:44 AM »
linuxboy & Sailor - Excellent analysis & dialogue. I feel better now knowing a little more about this cheese and flavor in general. Seems like another epiphany for me...realizing the role different cultures play in creating the final flavor profile.

linuxboy - I think you're right; I no doubt was measuring runoff from the vinegar soak. Duh!  ::)

I talked to Mike at Extech and he got me back on track with my meter. The "renew" went away. Whew!

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline Sailor Con Queso

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Posts: 2,522
  • Cheeses: 125
    • Boone Creek Creamery
Re: Beaufort Recipe
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2010, 09:29:00 AM »
Cheesemaking for me is all about understanding and manipulating the interactions between the bacteria and the steps in the process. I like to look at new recipes and understand why things are being done a certain way and how those steps effect the outcome of the finished cheese. In fact, I find it impossible to blindly follow a recipe without understand process. Understanding leads to an ability to consciously manipulate the outcome so the cheese is your unique creation.

For example, you took 60 minutes to hit target temperature instead of 30. Is that a big deal? Well.... Depends on what you're after. The cheese will be fine, however, it will not really be a Beaufort. A fast, hot cooking time seals the curds quicker which retains moisture instead of expelling whey. A longer time allows more whey to escape before the curd "rind" is sealed. So your cheese will not be as moist as it should be. Not necessarily bad. It may be better and it is your unique creation.

It's all about the little things. By the way, I assume you put a little Propionic into the starter mix. ;)
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Online Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,165
  • Cheeses: 193
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Beaufort Recipe
« Reply #10 on: August 07, 2010, 07:33:18 PM »
Cheesemaking for me is all about understanding and manipulating the interactions between the bacteria and the steps in the process. I like to look at new recipes and understand why things are being done a certain way and how those steps effect the outcome of the finished cheese. In fact, I find it impossible to blindly follow a recipe without understand process. Understanding leads to an ability to consciously manipulate the outcome so the cheese is your unique creation.

For example, you took 60 minutes to hit target temperature instead of 30. Is that a big deal? Well.... Depends on what you're after. The cheese will be fine, however, it will not really be a Beaufort. A fast, hot cooking time seals the curds quicker which retains moisture instead of expelling whey. A longer time allows more whey to escape before the curd "rind" is sealed. So your cheese will not be as moist as it should be. Not necessarily bad. It may be better and it is your unique creation.

It's all about the little things. By the way, I assume you put a little Propionic into the starter mix. ;)
You're right. I'll probably have something closer to an Emmental. Drier but, hopefully, still tasty down the road. For some reason I had a difficult time reaching the target temp point on-time. I need more practice, I guess.

I am trying to understand what's going on "behind the curtain" when I'm making cheese and not just blindly following a recipe like a robot. I try to post pictures here to log my mistakes and successes and to have someone inform me when one of my successes "shouldn't really be doing that or look like that."

And yes, I did add some Propionic. Hard to gauge 1/24 tsp though. I've got the pinch, dash, and smidgen spoons from The Cheesemaker. It was a guesstimate.

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,986
  • Cheeses: 198
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Re: Beaufort Recipe
« Reply #11 on: August 07, 2010, 08:35:56 PM »
Boof, it'll only be an emmenthaler if you have a warm room aging period. These cheeses are very very forgiving. If you miss the salt and moisture target, they'll still taste good. These do need minimum of 8 months to age, especially if the moisture content is less than expected.
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Online Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,165
  • Cheeses: 193
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Beaufort Recipe
« Reply #12 on: August 11, 2010, 02:01:33 AM »
Alright, that works for me. A bit drier Beaufort than per the style, but hopefully still quite edible. And yes, this one was slated for an extended aging period.

I am somewhat anxious of how much better this cheese could have been had I been more aggressive with the heating...
A fast, hot cooking time seals the curds quicker which retains moisture instead of expelling whey. A longer time allows more whey to escape before the curd "rind" is sealed. So your cheese will not be as moist as it should be.
...and somewhere down the road I will be redoing this with an eye towards pulling in these details.

Which contributes more of the authentic "alpine/Swiss" taste: Propionic shermanii or the LH?

-Boofer-

Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,986
  • Cheeses: 198
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Re: Beaufort Recipe
« Reply #13 on: August 11, 2010, 10:43:40 AM »
both. :)

LH has sweeter and nutty notes and propionic ranges all over the place from sweet to sharp because it produces so many compounds.
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Online Boofer

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Parkland, Washington
  • Posts: 4,165
  • Cheeses: 193
  • Contemplating cheese
Re: Beaufort Recipe
« Reply #14 on: September 06, 2010, 02:22:36 AM »
My rind seemed to be pretty tight so I went ahead and sealed it yesterday. Now I wait until this time next year. Fingers crossed.

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.