Author Topic: Butter Making Discussion  (Read 6277 times)

Offline slow learner

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Re: Butter Making Discussion
« Reply #15 on: July 21, 2009, 10:05:45 PM »
I'm sure this is a silly question but can butter be made from buttermilk? Is the process different?


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Online MrsKK

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Re: Butter Making Discussion
« Reply #16 on: July 22, 2009, 01:53:06 PM »
Short answer, No.

Buttermilk is what is left over when cream is made into butter.  Churning separates the fat (butter) out of the cream, leaving behind buttermilk. 

Just gotta brag - I'm getting two pounds of really nice yellow butter out of every gallon of cream this summer.  Yum!

Offline squirrel

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Re: Butter Making Discussion
« Reply #17 on: December 22, 2009, 04:08:49 PM »
Does anyone use an electric butter churn? I'm considering getting one because of the quantity of cream I have. Looking for recommendations if anyone has some experience with one. The least expensive one I have found is from Glengarry and costs $190 plus shipping:

http://www.glengarrycheesemaking.on.ca/equipment.htm

Raw cream in the winter time does not churn easily unless it is cultured, so to get the sweet cream butter I was thinking of trying an electric churn.

Offline Tea

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Re: Butter Making Discussion
« Reply #18 on: December 30, 2009, 02:09:40 PM »
No I haven't tried a butter churn.  I just just my Kitchen Aid, or Kenwood.   Are you intending to make large batches of butter?  Just wondering why you are looking at a churn?

Offline FarmerJD

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Re: Butter Making Discussion
« Reply #19 on: December 31, 2009, 08:34:41 AM »
Squirrel.
I use one but I would not but a new one. I constantly watch ebay and buy backups there when mine burns up. I have gone through 3 or 4 in 10 years.


Here is one http://cgi.ebay.com/GEM-DANDY-ELECTRIC-BUTTER-CHURN-MOTOR-MADE-IN-USA-WORKS_W0QQitemZ370283085512QQcmdZViewItemQQptZLH_DefaultDomain_0?hash=item5636977ec8#ht_3978wt_1165


It is just like my last one. You can watch some of the auctions and find better deals but this one is a good example.


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Offline kawatiri kaas

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Re: Butter Making Discussion
« Reply #20 on: January 01, 2010, 02:19:29 AM »
We make butter from 'home-skimmed' raw milk/cream. And the milk content (which seems inevitable, as DW prefers completely skimmed milk) does seem to slow the buttering coming. Temp is the other big factor, often we take our straight out of the fridge and it'll take a full 10 min. but if it's warmer the time certainly is pared back (20'C is the target). We use the kitchen whizz on the lowest speed, works ok, but personally would rather have a 'real' (hand operated) churn if I had the opportunity. Tried washing it in the whizz as well but figured I was wasting my time (as it seemed to continually smash more fat out), so I wash the butter by hand now.
Cheers,
Brett Westport West Coast New Zealand

Offline Michael_A

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Re: Butter Making Discussion
« Reply #21 on: January 16, 2010, 02:55:35 PM »
I got one of these http://www.rubbermaid.com/Category/Pages/ProductDetail.aspx?spaceId=Kitchen%28RubbermaidSpaces%29&CatName=Beverage&SubcatId=BeverageStorage&Prod_ID=RP091197 at the thrift store the other day while I was looking for possible cheese molds.  I used it to make butter last night.  I used cultured cream at cool room temp and I had butter in about a minute and a half.  I then turned the top to strain and carefully poured out about 90% of the buttermilk with no loss of butter.  After that I chilled it in a pot of snow, which I am abundantly supplied with at the moment, for a half hour and then washed it by hand in the same pitcher.  Yielded a nice 1.5 lbs of cultured butter from 3.5 pints of cream.  Probably about 10 minutes of actual working time including washing the dishes.

A caveat:  about 4 strokes after it turned to butter it sucked the pad off of the rod, but that could be fixed by drilling a small hole through both and using a little stainless steel screw or pin to hold them together, but still be removable for cleaning.  Or you could use the loss to tell you when it was butter.  Otherwise, a very nice little churn.

Michael

Online MrsKK

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Re: Butter Making Discussion
« Reply #22 on: January 17, 2010, 08:17:19 AM »
I love thrift store finds!  If they don't work out, you haven't invested much money, but when they do work out, you can be really proud of your experimental attitude.

Offline squirrel

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Re: Butter Making Discussion
« Reply #23 on: January 18, 2010, 05:29:49 PM »
I went ahead and ordered the 2.5 gallon electric churn for $229 from here:

http://www.wisementrading.com/butterchurns.htm

For some reason, the cream from my cow in the winter time in mid lactation is very slow to churn, especially if it is not cultured. I can't wait for it to arrive!

Offline FarmerJD

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Re: Butter Making Discussion
« Reply #24 on: January 18, 2010, 07:46:50 PM »
I can relate to your excitement. Let us know how it goes. By the way I have the same problem with my butter in the winter even when cultured. Very frustrating.


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Offline squirrel

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Re: Butter Making Discussion
« Reply #25 on: January 18, 2010, 11:03:10 PM »
Yeah - I wish I knew what causes that. I have to culture mine or I run out of patience before it churns. I've found that if I pasteurize my cream at 145 F for 30 minutes, cool to 60 F, add Meso II culture and sit at 60 F for about 30 hours I get a firm curd and a pleasant sourness to the cream. When churned, it makes excellent tasting butter - no sourness, nice buttery flavor. In my hand-crank churn, this takes anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour. I'll be happy to pass along this chore to the electric churn.

Offline FarmerJD

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Re: Butter Making Discussion
« Reply #26 on: January 19, 2010, 08:36:19 AM »
Twice a week we take a gallon of fresh milk from the morning milking and add the cream from about 3 gallons of milk from the previous day and then add half a cup of buttermilk. We let it set overnight by the woodstove and churn the next day. Sometimes it churns in minutes; other times it takes an hour. Very frustrating. I really don't know what is causing it. Some Oldtimers say add ice to it when it does that and others say add warm water. Tried both. Hard to tell if it helped.

Online MrsKK

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Re: Butter Making Discussion
« Reply #27 on: January 20, 2010, 06:55:55 AM »
I think that winter cream is just tough to get to turn to butter because the cows aren't getting fresh food anymore.  Once the grass starts growing, the problem goes away, so there must be something in the fresh, green grass that isn't present in dried hay.

I'm not getting enough cream right now to bother skimming it for buttermaking.  I'll wait for the spring flush.

Offline John (CH)

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Re: Butter Making Discussion
« Reply #28 on: February 03, 2010, 10:33:49 AM »
Farmer, you could make excess in summer and freeze for winter, if you had a large enough freezer?

When I used to work in Siberia in 91-93 after the breakup of USSR, the Russians had a hard time getting goods, so when they could, they bought lots. I remember a Russian friend in winter having 20 blocks of butter frozen on his balcony as his supplies (along with extra tires for car etc etc).

Offline judec

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Re: Butter Making Discussion
« Reply #29 on: February 04, 2010, 03:32:37 AM »
Anyone just making a small amount for using fresh, I just use a 2 litre coke bottle to shake it up.  I also use raw cream, just scooped off the top after it has sat for a day in fridge, then leave the cream out on the bench for  a few hours to sour a bit and come to room temp and then shake shake shake.  Only takes about 5 minutes.   Then I cut the bottle and it comes out in one bit.  Put into iced water and wash it and vo lah, yummy fresh butter to eat.  Neighbours love it.