Author Topic: Butter, Non-Cultured vs Cultured & Recipe  (Read 13449 times)

Offline zameluzza

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Butter, Non-Cultured vs Cultured & Recipe
« on: May 10, 2010, 12:14:42 PM »
Hi there,
I'm lost once again,
I was looking in to cultured butter, but don't seem to find much information. what exactly is the difference between cultured butter vs. uncultured butter?

and where could I find a receipe for making cultured butter,anyone can help me out.

thanks


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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Butter, Non-Cultured vs Cultured & Recipe
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2010, 12:24:41 PM »
To make cultured butter you inoculate the milk with a starter such as flora danica and hold it at about 80-85F. The cream coagulates and makes creme fraiche. Then you whip the creme fraiche to make butter.

With uncultured butter, you're using the cream as is without bacteria.
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Offline H.A.M.

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Re: Butter, Non-Cultured vs Cultured & Recipe
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2010, 12:31:43 PM »
When I make cultured butter I add mesophilic culture (1/8 tsp DVI per gallon)  to fresh cream, let stand 12 hrs at room temp (average 72*), then chill slightly and churn. You can use a variety of mesophilic cultures, allow fresh cream to stand and begin to culture with wild, inherent bacteria,  and some will culture the cream with kefir grains.
I prefer the light, clean taste of a very basic meso culture such as  MA 19.
If you look on this page you will see Flora Danica and Aromatic Type B recommended for cultured butter. I think that most of the cultured butter I've tasted is cultured with these types.

The alternative to cultured butter is sweet cream butter which is simply fresh or sweet cream churned.


Offline zameluzza

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Re: Butter, Non-Cultured vs Cultured & Recipe
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2010, 12:32:37 PM »
To make cultured butter you inoculate the milk with a starter such as flora danica and hold it at about 80-85F. The cream coagulates and makes creme fraiche. Then you whip the creme fraiche to make butter.

With uncultured butter, you're using the cream as is without bacteria.
thanks linux, I usualy make cream with no culture, but I was wondering what is the differenc? is it different taste?does i last longer?
is it more like store bought butter in the taste?

and how long do you let the it inoclate till it's ready to be churned?

Offline zameluzza

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Re: Butter, Non-Cultured vs Cultured & Recipe
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2010, 12:34:24 PM »
To make cultured butter you inoculate the milk with a starter such as flora danica and hold it at about 80-85F. The cream coagulates and makes creme fraiche. Then you whip the creme fraiche to make butter.

With uncultured butter, you're using the cream as is without bacteria.
thanks linux, I usualy make cream with no culture, but I was wondering what is the differenc? is it different taste?does i last longer?
is it more like store bought butter in the taste?

and how long do you let the it inoclate till it's ready to be churned?

thanks HAM I will look in to the link :) OK slowly I think I understand it :) but just slowly ;P


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Offline H.A.M.

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Re: Butter, Non-Cultured vs Cultured & Recipe
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2010, 03:21:09 PM »
Most store bought butter is sweet cream butter.

Cultured butter does taste differently and it stores longer at room temp without developing off flavors. I think most people like cultured butter for the piquant flavor. It tastes more "like grandma used to make."  ;)

Offline Nitai

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Re: Butter, Non-Cultured vs Cultured & Recipe
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2010, 05:46:57 PM »
I often use Aroma B to culture the cream and it has the added benefit of a nice thick buttermilk after churning. The thick buttermilk has more uses than the thin buttermilk from uncultered cream.

Offline zameluzza

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Re: Butter, Non-Cultured vs Cultured & Recipe
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2010, 06:59:55 PM »
Most store bought butter is sweet cream butter.

Cultured butter does taste differently and it stores longer at room temp without developing off flavors. I think most people like cultured butter for the piquant flavor. It tastes more "like grandma used to make."  ;)

hmm I never had Butter my gradma made :(
I just remember in Switzerland we had kochbutter (cookbutter) and then there was the yummy Floralp butter,

I guess I just will try it out and see how it turns out, my family does not like salted butter, so all our butter remains unsalted, and I know that does not help for storage,

funny thing is I still prefer store bought one for some reason.
I often use Aroma B to culture the cream and it has the added benefit of a nice thick buttermilk after churning. The thick buttermilk has more uses than the thin buttermilk from uncultered cream.

thanks a bunch, like I said above I will try a small batch once I get some cream again, I'm guessing this week sometimes,.

Offline Nitai

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Re: Butter, Non-Cultured vs Cultured & Recipe
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2010, 10:10:28 PM »
The only downside I find to my butter is in some baking applications. Because it is hard to get all the moisture out, it does not work as well as store-bought for baked goods with texture determined largely by the butter. And I would certainly be scared to try it in buttercream icing. Maybe I just need a butterpat.

As far as storage, I make a lot of my butter into ghee. Cant make icing with ghee but it sure is wonderful. If you ever deep fry, ghee is top of the line.

Offline zameluzza

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Re: Butter, Non-Cultured vs Cultured & Recipe
« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2010, 09:36:34 PM »
The only downside I find to my butter is in some baking applications. Because it is hard to get all the moisture out, it does not work as well as store-bought for baked goods with texture determined largely by the butter. And I would certainly be scared to try it in buttercream icing. Maybe I just need a butterpat.

As far as storage, I make a lot of my butter into ghee. Cant make icing with ghee but it sure is wonderful. If you ever deep fry, ghee is top of the line.
Nitai, that's exactly what my sister-in-law sais, she can't bake with the home made butter,so she uses storebought one for it,
Now I have to look up what ghee is, have no clue... off searching ghee :)


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Offline Nitai

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Re: Butter, Non-Cultured vs Cultured & Recipe
« Reply #10 on: May 12, 2010, 10:19:08 PM »
ghee is clarified butter. You cook butter on the stove or in the oven till foam rises to the top and the solids separate to the bottom. Scoop off foam. Strain out solids, and voila. With impurities gone you can now deep fry and sautee with it. And it keeps for ever practically.

Offline zameluzza

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Re: Butter, Non-Cultured vs Cultured & Recipe
« Reply #11 on: May 12, 2010, 10:24:14 PM »
ghee is clarified butter. You cook butter on the stove or in the oven till foam rises to the top and the solids separate to the bottom. Scoop off foam. Strain out solids, and voila. With impurities gone you can now deep fry and sautee with it. And it keeps for ever practically.
thanks, I went to look for it and found out *LOL* I knew that *LOL* just not the english word, after reading up all was clear
thanks

English translation of eingesottene Butter: ghee; clarified butter

Offline tnsven

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Re: Butter, Non-Cultured vs Cultured & Recipe
« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2010, 07:42:16 AM »
Interesting about the water in the butter not being good for baking. I've never had a problem with this. How do you work the butter? I do not find a paddle very useful.

Offline Nitai

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Re: Butter, Non-Cultured vs Cultured & Recipe
« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2010, 05:05:25 PM »
I basically just go at it with my hands. Well, first I try to keep it broken up in little bits from the food processor, and I completely submerge it multiple times in water and as I squeeze it about and what not it becomes one mass. Then no matter how much I squeeze and twist and crack and squeeze, some water remains. Its not a huge amount, but I have not had the results I expect baking something like a buttery biscuit, or scones that rely on a lot of butter.

I found paddles to be useless as well.

Offline zameluzza

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Re: Butter, Non-Cultured vs Cultured & Recipe
« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2010, 05:27:40 PM »
on Sunday I have talked to a family member and she does her butter herself to and bakes with it,what she does every night is bring raw milk in from the barn, then she boils the milk and sets it aside, the next morning she takes the cream of the top and puts it in a jar, she does that every single day, and when she has plentuy of cream she makes butter. she said she never has problems baking...
I have never tried this and I won't do it, it's just to much work for me, but for someone else it may work.