Author Topic: Gouda - Rapid pH Drop  (Read 1132 times)

Offline Nitai

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Gouda - Rapid pH Drop
« on: May 30, 2010, 09:04:11 PM »
As I mentioned in another thread, I made an 8 gal batch of Gouda today from raw Jersey milk. After 1 hour from innoculation the PH had not changed. Linuxboy said this is likely due to too little starter and super fresh milk. Makes sense. So I continued on with the process (most things went great, my research is really paying off) got the curds into four 450 g kadovas and one 8" St. Paulin mold. Unfortunately I did not fill the kadovas enough, so after a while I had to stack 2 on top of each other and press like that, making for a less appealing appearance.

They are knitting well and looking good BUT, after only 5.5 hours in the press the whey is reading 5.15PH. This is too low, and shockingly fast considering how slow the acidification was at first. I tested the meter in PH4 buffer solution and it read 4.05, so it is not drastically off (plus it is off in the wrong direction). So now I am debating whether or not to trust the meter and brine the cheeses after only 5.5 hours, or press overnight (temps will be around 60-65F in the room). Any thoughts are much appreciated.


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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Gouda - Rapid pH Drop
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2010, 09:24:32 PM »
You rennetted after the 1 hour, right? What was pH when you started washing the curds? Above 6.3? (this is key to gouda) That acidification seems normal for MM100. I prefer a more classic inoculant in my gouda, that has some diacetylactis and leuconostoc, the strains that produce minimal gas. 4001 from Danisco works, and so does Chr Hansen's CHN-19 or CHN-11. MM100 is not bad, just not my preference.

If your knit is good, go ahead and brine. You hit your pH, time to add the salt.

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Offline Nitai

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Re: Gouda - Rapid pH Drop
« Reply #2 on: May 30, 2010, 09:30:36 PM »
Yes I renneted with 1 tablet of veg rennet. I tested floc first time at 8 min and it was done, so I think I should use less next time. At washing the PH was 6.55. You are saying that is good? I did add LM57 so I got some diacetylactis at least.

So MM100 normally starts a little slow and then ramps up a lot?

Well, I am feeling pretty good, into the brine we go.

Thanks so much Linux.

Offline linuxboy

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Re: Gouda - Rapid pH Drop
« Reply #3 on: May 30, 2010, 09:48:45 PM »
Yep, at 6.55 washing you'll get enough stability in the casein bonds to get a decent knit, and late enough that you'll have enough culture to acidify and add cheese flavor. And with a thorough washing, you should be able to remove enough lactose that the acid tang will not be as bad.

You did great! I have no idea on knit or curd size/moisture, or temp schedule, but this should be close to a gouda.  Slightly concerned about your rennet amount, but it doesn't sound drastically bad.

How do the curds taste? Mild, slightly sweet, with a buttery tang and light acidic finish? Cheese is somewhat rubbery, but not dramatically so? That's how it should be pre-brine.
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Offline Nitai

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Re: Gouda - Rapid pH Drop
« Reply #4 on: May 30, 2010, 10:16:17 PM »
I'm going to load pictures shortly but otherwise:

Curds were cut 1/2 inch but it seems like they may have ended up a bit smaller, but it was sooo much nicer than last year cutting with curd knife. Everything was cut, quite uniform, and practically no matting at all.

I started with milk at 86F, healed for 10 min after 24 min renneting, stirred for 30. Scalded at 98, the low end of what Peter Dixon says. I am shooting for a very soft Gouda. stirred for 30 more, let settle for 10 and then proceeded toward pressing. I only pressed with 74LB spread over the four 450g Kadovas, and 70LB on the 8". Maintained approx 75-80F during pressing, and my knit seems to be sufficient :)

Curds tasted good, way better than last year. They have the characteristics you mention although I was not paying much attention to the subtleties of buttery tang and acidic finish, but I noted the other things for sure.


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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Gouda - Rapid pH Drop
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2010, 10:36:58 PM »
You got it, sound like this will be a great cheese. Remember to pay attention to the different brine lengths for the different size cheeses :). Now the hard part - waiting :). Guess you'll have to make some more to keep your mind occupied.  8)
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Offline Nitai

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Re: Gouda - Rapid pH Drop
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2010, 11:00:51 PM »
Yea, I think I will be doing two 8 gal batches per week for now. Next up, Parmesan (hopefully).

Here are some pictures:

The babies are flat on one side because I had to put 2 together to press them since they were underfilled. The other two (not pictured) have an ugly ridge from the lid of the kadovas. Oh well. I definitely wont use the 8" for a batch this size next time, too pancake-y. Also I should not get lazy at the last minute and not wrap the cheese, as evidenced by the nipples.

All that aside, I am pretty thrilled!

One other thing I discovered, my stainless steel paddle from Bayou Classic was far from sealed, and after stirring in rennet I discovered the handle was full of milk, which proceeded to begin coagulating, inside. Luckily they are sending me a new one (Amazon) and I will be sure to stop by the machine shop before this goes into a pot. They are making me send back the bad one—they are in for a smelly treat.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Gouda - Rapid pH Drop
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2010, 12:52:30 AM »
They look pretty nice to me!

Offline Nitai

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Re: Gouda - Rapid pH Drop
« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2010, 05:13:04 PM »
Well I have been super busy but before I knew it cheesemaking day has come again. Since I did not have time to research and prepare a recipe, I decided to do Gouda again, Mustard Gouda this time. Everything went decently well, until....

My precarious pressing setup which included some weights and a 20kg russian kettlebell fell over in the sink, cracking my sink, badly...

I'll admit, I used to think the presses some of you are building were a bit excessive. Now I see just how wrong I was.  :-[

Offline the big cheese

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Re: Gouda - Rapid pH Drop
« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2010, 08:23:43 AM »
Oh noo!

The 20kg russian kettlebell does look very cool though  8)


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Offline Boofer

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Re: Gouda - Rapid pH Drop
« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2010, 01:05:41 PM »
My precarious pressing setup which included some weights and a 20kg russian kettlebell fell over in the sink, cracking my sink, badly...

I'll admit, I used to think the presses some of you are building were a bit excessive. Now I see just how wrong I was.  :-[

There is a certain peace of mind that comes from knowing that the press you've built will handle its end of your cheesemaking efforts effectively and safely.  ;)

Agreed: the Russian kettlebell is cool...but just not as a pressing solution. Too bad about the sink.  :'(

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