Author Topic: Triple Cream soft cheese  (Read 1565 times)

Offline linuxboy

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Re: Triple Cream soft cheese
« Reply #15 on: August 02, 2012, 02:18:04 PM »
No, please read Francois's comment

You can use most any soft ripened cheese recipe and just add more cream.  Triple cream in NZ is 0.41 PF, but that is very low I would think in comparison to the rest of the world since we naturally have more fat in whole milk than any other place I've ever been.
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.


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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Triple Cream soft cheese
« Reply #16 on: August 02, 2012, 03:58:25 PM »
Correct me if I am wrong, but triple cream is so named because it has triple the amount of fat content as would be the normal brie or camambert. That would make the PF ratio in the neighborhood of .3 
If it is higher than .4 then I am at a loss as to why it would be referred to as triple cream.

Offline FRANCOIS

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Re: Triple Cream soft cheese
« Reply #17 on: August 02, 2012, 07:51:04 PM »
Sorry about that, I meant double creams.  We don't make any triples.  Doubles are .41 and triples would then be about .3.

Offline bbracken677

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Re: Triple Cream soft cheese
« Reply #18 on: August 03, 2012, 10:50:00 AM »
Thanks! 
Last night I spent many hours reviewing all the data available on this website. It is amazing how much information is here! Once I begin my project I will post progress reports here, since even though I think I have the processes down (knowledge-wise) I am very much lacking in the experience department.
I will be starting with a gallon of store bought 2% milk, and will be adding a quart of heavy cream to reach the triple cream standard.
I am planning on starting the project in about a week or a tad less.

Offline iratherfly

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Re: Triple Cream soft cheese
« Reply #19 on: August 04, 2012, 01:48:15 AM »
Stay away from store bought milk. They fail miserably. Most are ultra pasteurized and pretty much dead. They are also homogenized which makes really bad texture and the fat behaves totally different.  If you can't get raw milk, try to find non-homogenized (also called creamtop, cream-top or creamline) milk from a local farmer's market or your nearest Whole Foods. You want it to be gently pasteurized. Obviously it is far more expensive but it makes the difference between success and failure of this cheese and it's a night and day difference in coagulation abilities and yield. It's also nice to know your milk comes from local grass fed cows of a local family farmer rather than a badly treated factory cattle that munches on corn/ferments, growth hormones and antibiotics (all of which may also fail your cheese).

Remember that when you age cheese, every little nuance in the milk amplifies ten folds. You won't be able to feel these things in your morning cereal or by adding a bit to your coffee, but in aged cheese all of these things come out.  You spend so much on cultures, fridge and time spent on this project, it would be disheartening to see if fail because of its #1 component: milk.


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Offline bbracken677

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Re: Triple Cream soft cheese
« Reply #20 on: August 04, 2012, 08:25:21 AM »
Thanks for the tip. The milk I was going to use is not ultra-pasteurized, but has resulted in some textural issues in the past that I thought were process driven. I can (and have used) a local supplier of raw milk in the past.....I was going the cheap route this first time, but you have changed my mind : )