Author Topic: Rubbery Texture  (Read 687 times)

Offline Minamyna

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Rubbery Texture
« on: June 29, 2010, 10:56:19 AM »
For some reason my arch enemy is rubberyness or squeakyness. The last 3 cheeses I have done have all come out a little rubbery. The mozz, and the last 2 batches of cottage cheese.

Seems like a rennet issue to me? But I have have used 3 different types of rennet...

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: Rubbery Texture
« Reply #1 on: July 02, 2010, 11:09:50 PM »
Off the top of my head I'd say rennet or temperature is the culpret here. To much rennet or over cooked curds can get rubbery.

Offline Minamyna

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Re: Rubbery Texture
« Reply #2 on: July 02, 2010, 11:13:24 PM »
I have a feeling I am cooking it too fast. Could that be the problem?

Offline linuxboy

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Re: Rubbery Texture
« Reply #3 on: July 02, 2010, 11:21:51 PM »
If it's rubbery, that means the curds are bonding well and are retaining too much calcium. Have you ever made an alpine type cheese? Like a swiss? Those wheels to me seem ultra rubbery, they're so pliable. That's because they're cut and pressed before the culture has had a chance to acidify the milk. If you wait and let the milk ripen longer before adding rennet, you will hit a lower pH at drain time, and that should give you a less rubbery, softer curd. Another thing you could do if pH is still high is to settle the curds, but don't stir them too much so they don't loose a lot of moisture. If they settle and rest, the acidity will build up, and the final curd will not be as rubbery.

Could be overcooked or too much rennet, but IMHO, I think it's acidity at the point when the milk is rennetted and then also when fused.
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Offline Minamyna

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Re: Rubbery Texture
« Reply #4 on: July 02, 2010, 11:25:54 PM »
So what you are telling me is stop F*)%$^&% around and buy a pH meter so you know if you are hitting your marks before you add rennet ;) ;) ?

I have never made an alpine type cheese-- its not high on the list right now. Yes I actually have a list of cheese I would liek to successfully make.
PS Linuxboy-- do you ever sleep? I have seen you on other forums.

I am starting a mozz with tonight's milk and so far I have:

1.2 or so gal whole Jersey milk @ 96 degrees F
1/8 tsp thermo b
1/16 of sharp lipase
Ripen for 75 mins (forgot the time)
added 1/2 tsp liquid rennet in 1/2 c water
set for 45 mins  (since that is a little more then what my floc has been with a 3x floc multiplier, i figured a 4x floc multiplier couldn't hurt)

cut in 1/2" chunk rested for 15 mins stirred, heat in hot water to 100 or 115 whatever your recipe says I have to go look.