Author Topic: My first washed-rind cheese . . . Esrom  (Read 12264 times)

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: My first washed-rind cheese . . . Esrom
« Reply #30 on: August 05, 2010, 04:16:43 PM »
Hi Boofer. I think we all had troubles with our first b.linens but I found spraying is cheaper and seems to work better than wetting. I have a tiny spray bottle that used to hold salad dressing or someting maybe butter that I got from my sister I use. I just lightly spray and tap dry if needed with paper towels and put it back in the box. Seems to work well. After about 10 days I wrap in freezer paper with a layer of the plastic cross stich mat on top and bottom and flip it every night before bed so it doesn't stick to the mat.


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Offline Boofer

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Re: My first washed-rind cheese . . . Esrom
« Reply #31 on: August 06, 2010, 01:43:44 AM »
Thanks for that, Debi. That sounds like a good solution. I'll save that for next time. I will consider this first try as part of my learning curve/initiation into the b. linens world. A new member, MrsMarbles, coined a phrase that seems appropriate here: I'll "eat the evidence" so that no one will see what I have created ("It's alive!!").  :P

I've been looking for a plastic box that I can convert into a mold so that my next Esrom is loaf-shaped as per the style. I'm hoping this current effort at least shows me what the flavor and texture might be.

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Offline Boofer

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Re: My first washed-rind cheese . . . Esrom
« Reply #32 on: August 08, 2010, 02:30:02 PM »
The waxed paper wrap really seems to be working to bring out the orange color. I haven't seen any nasties like I saw early on. One of the pics here shows the former star-shaped infection from an earlier posting. You can see it is a mere shadow of its former self.

If this cheese has any redeeming taste and texture qualities next week (week #6 and the final week in the ripening schedule) when I cut it open, I plan on going down this path again.

I'd like to eliminate the exaggerated, loose rind that this cheese developed. Hopefully I can do that by misting instead of using a cloth and by making sure the surfaces are not as moist as this one probably was. Finally, when I get to a certain point, I'll wrap the cheese to assist in the b. linens color coming out.

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Offline Boofer

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Re: My first washed-rind cheese . . . Esrom
« Reply #33 on: August 09, 2010, 09:25:51 AM »
Okay, the next time around for this cheese style, I'll be using this mold. Ordered it today.

Such devotion to one's craft!   8)

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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: My first washed-rind cheese . . . Esrom
« Reply #34 on: August 09, 2010, 03:10:49 PM »
That's look very pretty Boofer! You would think the paper would make it more moist but for some reason it keeps some of the moistness out and lets the b.linems grow. Maybe they like darkness like a cave? Wish I figured this out a few years ago. You'll also find you can affect the color of the molds this way too. I can get anywhere from electric yellow to red by changing the paper - still experimenting with this.

Hey I like the mold. I need a loaf mold for my American Muesters. Oh watch the cheesecloth with those stainless moulds they get tangled in the holes sometimes. PITA!


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Offline Boofer

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Re: My first washed-rind cheese . . . Esrom
« Reply #35 on: August 13, 2010, 07:38:25 PM »
Got the new mold in today! I guess I was surprised that it was bottomless, but that makes sense. I'll be using muslin with it anyway.

The pics show how close it is to a standard bread loaf pan. It should do quite nicely for my next Esrom or Brick.  :)

Got the new double sheet wrapping papers today too, so the Esrom will be leaving the waxed paper for nicer digs probably tonight. Then into cooler, longer-term storage for a bit. That's kind of an open question for me: Sunday will mark 6 weeks of rind development...when is the optimal timeframe to cut into this cheese? Now? A month from now? I guess I should take a hint from the Reblochon and Cam department. I think it's ready now.  ;D

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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: My first washed-rind cheese . . . Esrom
« Reply #36 on: August 14, 2010, 04:04:36 PM »
Nice!

Offline iratherfly

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Re: My first washed-rind cheese . . . Esrom
« Reply #37 on: August 21, 2010, 04:49:51 PM »
Did you open the cheese yet? The last photos looked as if your Geo/PC is receding and you get ammonia and butterfat to surface a bit so the cheese should be soft and runny outside. Perhaps over-ripened? How does it smell?

By the way, the former star infection catching on this yellow color might be just cellulose which naturally occurs in some cow's milk.

Offline Boofer

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Re: My first washed-rind cheese . . . Esrom
« Reply #38 on: August 21, 2010, 05:06:57 PM »
Did you open the cheese yet? The last photos looked as if your Geo/PC is receding and you get ammonia and butterfat to surface a bit so the cheese should be soft and runny outside. Perhaps over-ripened? How does it smell?

By the way, the former star infection catching on this yellow color might be just cellulose which naturally occurs in some cow's milk.
I didn't add any geo or pen to the mix...just b. linens per the recipe in 200 Easy Cheeses. I intend to cut into this cheese this weekend. I began the ripening on July 1st so that makes it just about the 7-week mark. The recipe called for 6 weeks of wiping and care. I wrapped it in double wall cheese paper a week ago and put it into the big fridge which is colder than the cave.

I am anxious to cut into it and see how my first effort turned out. I want to be encouraged by what I see, smell, and taste because now I've got the true-to-style brick mold to do it more accurately the second time through.

Of course I will be grabbing a few pics of the cut cheese to accompany my critical commentary.

A question looming in my mind is: once I cut the cheese (  ::) ), what is the norm for storing the leftover portions (assuming the cheese is infinitely edible and absolutely delicious! ;D )? Just rewrap it in the cheese paper and put it back in the big fridge and consume within, say, a week?

Also, this style doesn't look to be ultra-soft and runny, but more like a sliceable cheese.

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Offline iratherfly

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Re: My first washed-rind cheese . . . Esrom
« Reply #39 on: August 21, 2010, 06:54:57 PM »
Well... the photo got me thinking in the wrong direction then. Can't wait to see it. Which B.Linen did you use for this color? It does seem like you have at least some natural occurrence of Geo there (powdery white in between the creases). You don't need to inoculate geo for it to pop up and say hi...

I wrap the cheese with cheese paper. (you can get it at cheese stores and places like Whole Foods). If non is available, I put it in an airtight container that leaves about 70% air in it for the cheese to breath. What's the worst that could happen? It will grow the mold that you put in it to begin with? You just don't want it to dry or swim in its own water.


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Offline Boofer

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Re: My first washed-rind cheese . . . Esrom
« Reply #40 on: August 23, 2010, 12:47:48 AM »
Using my new cheese wire (the SS wire courtesy of Wayne...thanks!), I cut into my Esrom today. I took a small sampler wedge and rewrapped the rest and put it back in the fridge. I let the wedge stay out, covered with plastic wrap, for several hours. The cheese was only slightly oozy when first cut, but after coming to room temperature it oozed from each rind surface. Not exactly what I had in mind for this cheese style, but I'm keeping an open mind. It's supposed to be a sandwich cheese.

I needed some crusty bread for this tasting so while the cheese was coming to room temperature, I made a couple loaves. Nice.

I invited my wife over to use her nose and later, her palate to give me another sensory viewpoint. She couldn't detect anything unsavory (smelly socks, etc., which is supposed to be the hallmark of b. linens). She's really put off by the smell of my Manchego, but I really don't smell it like she does. We both agreed on a slight bitterness, but it didn't seem to keep me from devouring most of the wedge. Yeah, she tried a little.

Even though there is ooziness at the rind, the rest of the cheese borders a little towards crumbly. I was able to slice it very thinly though. The salt level seems right on target and neither one of us sensed any sourness (acidity) as in earlier cheese efforts. I saw maybe one small mechanical opening in the paste (it had been pressed very lightly).

There are two areas of concern to me: the ooziness and the slight bitterness. I'm wondering if either or both of those characteristics will be mitigated by continued aging in the fridge.

At this point I am encouraged with my seeming first experience with a washed rind cheese. I would like to try this again with the new brick mold. This make used mucor rennet. I have calf rennet now and would use it in the next effort. I learned a lot from this cheese. Curious work that those little bacteria do.  8)

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Offline mtncheesemaker(Pam)

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Re: My first washed-rind cheese . . . Esrom
« Reply #41 on: August 23, 2010, 08:48:32 AM »
Hi Boofer;
Glad your cheese is good.
I'm thinking that the ooziness under the rind is due to the activity of the white molds that colonized the cheese, maybe aided by too high humidity in aging.
I'm still looking for the perfect "washing" technique for this type of cheese, and rind/paste development. Some have been too wet, some have been too dry, but they are getting better.
Congrats,
Pam

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: My first washed-rind cheese . . . Esrom
« Reply #42 on: August 23, 2010, 10:33:17 PM »
The rind got to looking really pretty Boofer. Those white molds to like to soften up the outter edges if they get to damp but the paste looks good. I find esrom a bit funky tasting anyway. One of those cheeses that leave a dry, slightly bitter taste at the back of your tongue a minute or so after you eat it. Maybe that's just a white mold trait? I seem to have the reaction to all the white mold cheeses.

Offline Boofer

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Re: My first washed-rind cheese . . . Esrom
« Reply #43 on: August 24, 2010, 12:51:54 AM »
The white mold is all voluntary...I didn't add any. Besides the culture all I added was the b. linens.

So the correction for the ooziness is to reduce the amount of moisture I'm applying to the rind? Debi, did you have a commercial Esrom, and if so, was it loaf-shaped and suitable for sandwich material? I don't think it should have bitterness.

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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: My first washed-rind cheese . . . Esrom
« Reply #44 on: August 24, 2010, 04:58:38 PM »
Boofer -

Yes I had store bought esrom from the Big Y supermarket. It was a small flat square about an inch thick sealed in plastic. I have no idea what the whole wheel was shaped like, but it could have been square. I wanted to try it before making it so I bought a chunk in the cheese section. I believe it was from somewhere in Canada but I don't remember where. The inicial flavor was good but a minute after swallowing it left a bitter taste on the back of my tongue. Kind of like an old and dry green bell pepper if that makes sense.