Author Topic: How does a ewe's milk Chaource sound?  (Read 820 times)

Offline blackthorn

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How does a ewe's milk Chaource sound?
« on: July 08, 2010, 11:37:46 PM »
Hi Everyone  :)
I've been making some ewe's milk camemberts but although they are nice and all I really don't think they are a great fit for my ewe's milk...........so I'm thinking that a lactic curd might be more interesting, I have 2 recipes one is the Glengarry (M.Morris) and the other is from 200 easy cheese recipes, both suggest using Geo 15 and P.candidum (I'm wondering if this is likely to cause slip skin or not?), they differ in the setting times (Morris is 8 hours culturing then 8 hours setting with 2 drops of rennet, 200 easy cheese is 12 hours setting/culturing combined), I'd prefer to do the whole lot at once (besides I'm afraid the milk might set in 8 hours!), I made a lactic curd yesterday just to try it out I had 8L of milk and I used 1/4 tsp of culture and 2 drops of rennet, let set overnight, and in the morning it had certainly set! It was only a touch less firm than my conventional rennet set curd. I'm draining most of it in a bag for soft herbed cheese and I'm draining a small amount in a few moulds to see how it behaves (as I didn't have the cultures to make Chaource)-one thing, how 'tangy' is lactic curd normally? I tried a bit and it was very, very tangy much more so than any other curds I've dealt with....normal? Does anyone have a PH for the curd once it's set overnight? Anyway my new cultures are arriving soon and I'll post about my very first ewe's milk Chaource  ;)
Vanessa


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Offline mtncheesemaker(Pam)

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Re: How does a ewe's milk Chaource sound?
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2010, 08:58:20 AM »
I think a lactic curd would be good with ewe's milk. I've been meaning to try one myself.
When I make chevre, which sets overnight, I only use 1/5 drop of rennet/gallon of milk. Maybe 2 drops is more than you need. I like the texture from draining in molds rather than a bag, but some lactic curd is so soft, it has to be pre-drained.
I've become very gun-shy of Geo in my soft cheeses.
Would love to see some pics.
Pam

Offline blackthorn

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Re: How does a ewe's milk Chaource sound?
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2010, 12:31:19 AM »
Thanks for the info re the rennet :) I've had problems with slip skin with just P.candidum-I'm keen to try the geo..........I'll try with both, may the beat cheese win!
Vanessa

Offline iratherfly

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Re: How does a ewe's milk Chaource sound?
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2010, 03:27:01 PM »
I know a NJ cheesemaker that makes a fantastic ewe's milk Valençay - a very traditional crottin-type pyramid Goats' semi-lactic cheese from the French Loire valley. His version is excellent and I know you can do this well with ewe's milk.

I would not fear slip skin so much, it's a very wet and soft cheese in its first 10 days or so and skin will get bruised and may even peel a bit here and there when you turn it, but it's not like a Camembert slip skin where under the skin you get this gooey madness that turns into ammonia by the time the heart of the cheese matures.

So first of, yes; it should be quite tart. Remember that you are acidifying the milk for 8-18 hours. It can almost taste like yogurt in some cases.

Secondly, do use Geo because it helps control the surface acidity and give you a hearty strong rind and bloom (which will also protect the cheese from drying out past the second week). Using ash can also help with humidity control and stabilizing acidity.

My regiment (on goat's milk) is to drain 12-18 hours in a mold at room temp. Turn over for another 12-18 hours, then do the salting (and ashing if any) and turn over for another 12 hours of draining. Then turn for another 12 hours so you have completed 48 hours draining and open area in room temp. Now I put it in an aging container (paper towel on the bottom, then eleveting platform and then a net on which it rests). I cover it partially and move it to the cave for cooler draining over the next few days. wipe the box dry morning and evening and replace the paper towel if its soaking. By the time the cheese firms up is drier to the touch it will also be blooming. When it has bloomed all around you want to move it to the refrigerator (probably 5-10 days old). I don't wrap it. Shelf life is long, but remember that after about 21 days it begins getting harder.

Offline blackthorn

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Re: How does a ewe's milk Chaource sound?
« Reply #4 on: October 02, 2010, 02:50:24 AM »
Thanks iratherfly, that's helpful, I have thought about pre-draining in a bag, they seem to either be too moist or too dry, what is your room temp and do you leave them in the molds for the salting/ashing? If you don't wrap how do you store them? In a container or just in the open?
Vanessa


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