Author Topic: Cambozola Cheese Making Recipe  (Read 6876 times)

Offline John (CH)

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Cambozola Cheese Making Recipe
« on: October 15, 2008, 05:45:47 PM »
« Last Edit: May 29, 2011, 03:05:42 PM by John (CH) »

Offline reg

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Re: Cambozola Cheese Recipe
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2008, 06:44:05 AM »
morning CH. i have never made this cheese but have bought it and can tell you that it is amazing ! this winter i'm going to try my hand at the soft cheeses and this will be one of them. thanks for posting the recipe

reg
reg

Offline John (CH)

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Re: Cambozola Cheese Recipe
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2008, 09:52:55 PM »
You're welcome reg, looks a straightforward cross between blue and Camembert, but I suspect getting it perfect will take practise!

Offline Tea

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Re: Cambozola Cheese Recipe
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2008, 05:00:31 PM »
This is the next cheese that I want to play around with.  I have a recipe for what is called a "White and Blue".  I have only scanned the recipe, but if it is different, I will try them both and see what the difference is.  One thing that I have noticed is different is that the recipe I have immerses the cheese in boiling water for a few seconds to kill off any blue from the outside, so that only the white grows.  mmm we shall see.

Offline Sing_cheese

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Re: Cambozola Cheese Recipe
« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2009, 11:23:12 PM »
Anyone have any luck with this?

I made two batches of this last weekend (one using MA11 and one using MA4001 as starters).  They are just starting to show white mold.  Will poke them just before I wrap them.  Any advice would be welcom.

Gerrit
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Offline Tea

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Re: Cambozola Cheese Recipe
« Reply #5 on: January 07, 2009, 02:08:54 PM »
Morning Gerrit, no I haven't tried this yet, as I am still having problems keeping my cave cool enough.  I am though very interested in giving this one a go, so I am very interested in your finding.  SO keep us updated on what you are doing.
Many thanks.

Offline Likesspace

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Re: Cambozola Cheese Recipe
« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2009, 09:28:00 PM »
Thanks for the recipe information!
This is one cheese that I want to have a go at but I first need to get my Camembert attempts turning out as they should. I think I'm getting closer but it will be another three weeks or so before I know for sure.
Cambozola is not only a cheese that sounds fun to make, you are certainly rewarded with one fantastic flavor at the end of the process.

Dave

Offline Sing_cheese

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Re: Cambozola Cheese Recipe
« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2009, 10:04:27 PM »
I used the following recipe.  It is interesting in that it seperates the curds into two groups and you only add the blue mold to the second.  It is like a recipe I used for a Gorgonzola a few weeks ago where one set of curds was from the evening and hung overnight the combine with morning curds hung for only an hour.  I will post some pics of this in the blue/hard cheese section.  They look like they are coming along great at three weeks.  Unfortunately I did not do much in the way of photo documentation on either the cambbozola ro the gorganzolo.

Here is the recipe (originally from Steve Shapson at thecheesemaker.com):

  Making Cambozola Cheese
 Cultures needed for a one or two gallon milk batch.
-Mesophilic Starter Culture (MM100-101 series or MA4000-4001 series or MA11-14-16 series) 1/3 tsp.
-Penicillum Candidum 1/16th tsp.
-Penicillium Roqueforti 1/16 tsp.
-Rennet(dissolved in a little amount of cool water). Use amount per stated on rennet package. Use any type of rennet.
-Calcium Chloride/optional/use ¼ tsp.(1.25ml) in ¼ cup of cool water.
-Non-iodized course salt

Milk:
Raw milk or 1 part heavy cream to 7 parts skim milk or non-homogenized whole milk.

Procedure:
Heat milk/cream to 85f (29.5c). Maintain this temperature throughout the process. Sprinkle the Penicillum Candidum and Mesophilic Starter Culture onto the warmed milk, allowing the dry cultures to thoroughly hydrolize. Then add the rennet and stir for a few minutes. Do not add the Penicillium Roqueforti  at this point.  It will be added later. Then gently stir the milk 2-4 minutes using top to bottom strokes. Allow the curd to set and test for clean break after about 60 minutes. After getting a clean, gently cut curds into ½ inch (1.5cm) cubes. Stir curds in the whey for 2-4 minutes. Drain off nearly 80% of the whey from the curds using either a colander or draining bag for 25-30 minutes. Now ladle the drained curds in your camembert moulds until they are half full using about 50% of the curds. Sprinkle a very small dusting of P. roqueforti mold powder (about 1/16 tsp.) on the top of the curds.  Ladle the rest of the curds into the half full Camembert moulds. Let the filled
 moulds drain for 16-24 hours until you see no additional draining. Turn the moulds over during this draining period at least 5 times so they drain uniformly. Once your cheese are drained and firm enough, take them out of their moulds and place them onto a draining mat/platform for salting. Lightly sprinkle about 1 tsp. of course non-iodized salt on all sides of each cheese. After salting, the cheeses can be set aside to age. The temperature should be 50-54f (10-12c) in your aging room. Cover your aging container when the cheeses no longer look excessively moist, making sure there is no moisture touching your cheeses. Flip your cheeses daily using clean hands. The white mold should begin to appear within 3-6 days, maybe a bit longer if the temperature is colder. After you see a good covering of white mold bloom on the cheeses, use a clean knitting needle or clean thin Phillips Head screwdriver, poke about 10 holes through the top of each cheese. These holes will air and help
 in the development of blue veining. Continue to age at 40-50f. You may have to re-poke holes if additional white mold bloom covers the holes. About 10-14 days after the first poking, wrap you cheeses in White Mold Paper and continue to age until you like the flavor. When the center of the cheese is a bit soft to the touch it has completed aging.  You can cut one cheese in half to see how ripe it is. A longer aging period will result in a stronger blue flavor.

Gerrit @ Urban Farmstead Singapore

http://sites.google.com/site/urbanfarmst

Offline Sing_cheese

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Re: Cambozola Cheese Recipe
« Reply #8 on: January 12, 2009, 02:01:01 AM »
pics of my Cambozola on poking day (sunday).  I did two batches one with EZAL M4001 starter and one with EZAL M11.  Did them in parallel and have much better mold growth on the M4001 (although the growth on the M11 is OK).  Cant explain this as both had same process and amounts of culture/mold spore etc.  Also placed side by side in boxes in the cheese cave so same conditions as well. Any one else had these type of results or a favorite culture for starting Camemberts (I also did two straight Camembert batches at the same time, with the same mold results).

Gerrit
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Offline Tea

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Re: Cambozola Cheese Recipe
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2009, 02:16:19 PM »
Sing they looks excellent.  Great work.  Good bloom coverage you have there too.  I tend to have problems with the cheese and mould sticking to the bamboo mats and riping off the surface mould.  Also be careful that mould doesn't start growing on the underside of the mats.  Lost a batch of cheese because I didn't realise, (even though I had sterilsed them) that a good growth of mould was growing on the underside, which infected the cheese.

Keep the pics coming.  I am interested to see how these mature.

Offline Nabil

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Re: Cambozola Cheese Recipe
« Reply #10 on: May 18, 2009, 07:39:26 AM »
I used the following recipe.  It is interesting in that it seperates the curds into two groups and you only add the blue mold to the second.  It is like a recipe I used for a Gorgonzola a few weeks ago where one set of curds was from the evening and hung overnight the combine with morning curds hung for only an hour.  I will post some pics of this in the blue/hard cheese section.  They look like they are coming along great at three weeks.  Unfortunately I did not do much in the way of photo documentation on either the cambbozola ro the gorganzolo.

Here is the recipe (originally from Steve Shapson at thecheesemaker.com):

  Making Cambozola Cheese
 Cultures needed for a one or two gallon milk batch.
-Mesophilic Starter Culture (MM100-101 series or MA4000-4001 series or MA11-14-16 series) 1/3 tsp.
-Penicillum Candidum 1/16th tsp.
-Penicillium Roqueforti 1/16 tsp.
-Rennet(dissolved in a little amount of cool water). Use amount per stated on rennet package. Use any type of rennet.
-Calcium Chloride/optional/use ¼ tsp.(1.25ml) in ¼ cup of cool water.
-Non-iodized course salt

Milk:
Raw milk or 1 part heavy cream to 7 parts skim milk or non-homogenized whole milk.

Procedure:
Heat milk/cream to 85f (29.5c). Maintain this temperature throughout the process. Sprinkle the Penicillum Candidum and Mesophilic Starter Culture onto the warmed milk, allowing the dry cultures to thoroughly hydrolize. Then add the rennet and stir for a few minutes. Do not add the Penicillium Roqueforti  at this point.  It will be added later. Then gently stir the milk 2-4 minutes using top to bottom strokes. Allow the curd to set and test for clean break after about 60 minutes. After getting a clean, gently cut curds into ½ inch (1.5cm) cubes. Stir curds in the whey for 2-4 minutes. Drain off nearly 80% of the whey from the curds using either a colander or draining bag for 25-30 minutes. Now ladle the drained curds in your camembert moulds until they are half full using about 50% of the curds. Sprinkle a very small dusting of P. roqueforti mold powder (about 1/16 tsp.) on the top of the curds.  Ladle the rest of the curds into the half full Camembert moulds. Let the filled
 moulds drain for 16-24 hours until you see no additional draining. Turn the moulds over during this draining period at least 5 times so they drain uniformly. Once your cheese are drained and firm enough, take them out of their moulds and place them onto a draining mat/platform for salting. Lightly sprinkle about 1 tsp. of course non-iodized salt on all sides of each cheese. After salting, the cheeses can be set aside to age. The temperature should be 50-54f (10-12c) in your aging room. Cover your aging container when the cheeses no longer look excessively moist, making sure there is no moisture touching your cheeses. Flip your cheeses daily using clean hands. The white mold should begin to appear within 3-6 days, maybe a bit longer if the temperature is colder. After you see a good covering of white mold bloom on the cheeses, use a clean knitting needle or clean thin Phillips Head screwdriver, poke about 10 holes through the top of each cheese. These holes will air and help
 in the development of blue veining. Continue to age at 40-50f. You may have to re-poke holes if additional white mold bloom covers the holes. About 10-14 days after the first poking, wrap you cheeses in White Mold Paper and continue to age until you like the flavor. When the center of the cheese is a bit soft to the touch it has completed aging.  You can cut one cheese in half to see how ripe it is. A longer aging period will result in a stronger blue flavor.

any updates for this nice cheeses? did u cut them?

Offline Cyn

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Re: Cambozola fave cultures
« Reply #11 on: June 02, 2009, 12:03:46 PM »
Those are pretty cambozolas. You asked about fave cultures - I make my cambozolas with MM100, MD89, and molds P. candidum, GEO17 (although I want to try GEO13 too) & P. roq. About 1/2 the time I ash them as well - IME slows initial mold growth but when it comes it is thick and deep. I also innoculate p. roq by spray bottle onto the curds as I mould them. Not sure if that matters or not.

My camis I use the same cultures as above, but I've been wanting to try the MM4001 to see if there is a difference. I like the creaminess of my current combo.

Maybe next batch I'll try MM400.1 & just toss the p. roq in with the others and let the best mold win.