Author Topic: cut new washed rind  (Read 2087 times)

Offline clherestian

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cut new washed rind
« on: August 03, 2010, 07:41:09 PM »
I cut a new washed rind today. It is 32 days old, and it was straight out of the fridge for these pics.










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Offline Mondequay

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Re: cut new washed rind
« Reply #1 on: August 03, 2010, 07:59:03 PM »
Looks great! Wish I had one in my fridge.

Offline Brie

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Re: cut new washed rind
« Reply #2 on: August 03, 2010, 08:39:09 PM »
Looks luscious--it is a Reblochon? How did it taste?
Darn, another cheese meltdown--ahh, perfect fondue.

Offline mtncheesemaker(Pam)

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Re: cut new washed rind
« Reply #3 on: August 03, 2010, 08:48:11 PM »
Good job! Looks great!
Pam

Offline clherestian

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Re: cut new washed rind
« Reply #4 on: August 03, 2010, 10:00:38 PM »
No, it isn't a reblochon, but it is similar in size and appearance. The make is similar to P Dixon's Tallegio recipe with some things changed to make the paste softer. The affinage is different than his recipe, and I used yeast, geo, b linens.

The taste was very similar to tallagio, but a little more funky. I like it because I can eat it at 32 days even though it is raw.


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Offline Brie

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Re: cut new washed rind
« Reply #5 on: August 03, 2010, 10:10:45 PM »
Please post your recipe when you have the time.
Darn, another cheese meltdown--ahh, perfect fondue.

Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: cut new washed rind
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2010, 04:06:14 PM »
Sounds good I prefer tallaigo to the reblochon - must be the Italian in me. Although I am half Canadian French my food preference is definately Italian.

Offline Boofer

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Re: cut new washed rind
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2010, 01:57:40 AM »
Please post your recipe when you have the time.
I second that!  Please...?

Looks fantastic.

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.

Offline Oberhasli

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Re: cut new washed rind
« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2010, 11:26:31 AM »
Wow - that looks good.  Geez, between you and Pam, I've been drooling all over my keyboard lately.  That cheese looks perfect inside!

Nice job.

Bonnie
Better to train people and risk they leave,
than do nothing and risk they stay.     Anonymous

Offline clherestian

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Re: cut new washed rind
« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2010, 09:23:29 PM »
You should just follow P Dixon's Tallegio recipe. It is a really good recipe. I'll post my recipe, but all I did was change the culture a wee bit and screw with the rind. His recipe is probably better. I'll post mine in a few days after out company leaves.


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Offline Alice in TX/MO

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Re: cut new washed rind
« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2010, 06:55:54 PM »
Where do you order that culture?
Goat milk rocks.

Offline clherestian

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Re: cut new washed rind
« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2010, 08:30:41 PM »
Here is my recipe. if any of our resident experts (Francois or Linux Boy) see any room for improvement, please chime in.

Again, I suggest you start with P Dixon's Tallegio recipe. His recipe is better and will produce a real Tallegio. The reason I changed it is because the rind didn't develop the way I wanted it, I didn't have Tallegio molds, and I wanted a slightly different flavor.


2 gallons raw cows milk at 94F. Hold milk at 94F throughout recipe.

Using a 1/100 gram scale, add 1.54 grams Abiasa Thermophile Type C. Add a small pinch of b linens. I use Danisco SR3. Add a small pinch of Geo 13. Add a small pinch of KL71. Wait 30 minutes.

.87 grams single strength calf rennet

Check for flocculation. Wait for 4 times the floc. from time of adding rennet to cutting curds. Last time my floc was 21 minutes.

Cut curds into 2 inch pieces

After cutting is complete, wait 5 minutes and cut curds into 1/4 inch pieces.

After cutting is complete, settle curds under whey for 5 minutes.

Remove whey down to level of curds. I dip a mesh strainer into my pot and then use a small plastic cup to ladle out the whey inside the strainer.

Briefly stir curds. Ladle curds and whey into forms. I use two of these forms:

http://www.cheesemaking.com/store/p/45-Hard-Cheese-Mold-Small-1.html

If you don't drain enough whey, then you will have too much material for the forms. I set the molds on top of a sheet of plastic craft matting set on a cookie cooling rack inside a baking tray.

You need to flip the molds over at least 3 times, 1 hour apart. This can be tricky because the curds and whey mixture inside the molds is sloppy. I hold another mat across the top of the mold and then flip it over quick. If not enough whey is draining, I will press with very light pressure - maybe one 16 oz can of veggies per cheese.

Remove molds. if you do this too soon, you will have a mess. Allow cheese to drain at 70F - 77F for 18-24 hours until ph 5.3. The cheese will seem squishy and bulge. Keep flipping it, so gravity doesn't make it wider at one end. For the last several hours, I take away the matting and dry the cheese directly on the cooling rack. This allows it to dry out more. If you do it too soon, the indentations will be too deep.

Rub cheese with coarse flake salt. Use 1.5% of weight of cheese.

Move cheese to 50F.  Allow it to continue to dry till the surface is COMPLETELY dry. Inside my mini fridge, this usually takes two to three days. it is ready when the surface has begun to draw together and it almost has tiny cracks in it.

Age in 95% humidity. Washing schedule is every other day for two weeks, every third day for two weeks and then once a week thereafter. Only slightly dampen the cheese. Washing solution is 3% brine with a pinch of b linens. Yeast will develop in the first day or two after you start washing (should smell like a pretzel). Then you will notice the geo in 5-7 days. It looks like a thin white and velvety or fuzzy layer. After 10-15 days, you should start smelling the b linens.  If you look at the rind on a Tallegio, it is a dry smooth rind, not a tacky smear rind. When you wash, you can buff the rind smooth if it needs it. Sometimes you will need to scrub off some of the geo if you feel it is getting to thick.

Flip the cheese daily. If you are aging it in a sealed container it needs some air exchange every day. It doesn't hurt to open the container more than once a day if you have time. 

You can cut the cheese at any point from 33 days onward. 33-40 days will produce a consistency similar to what you will find in store bought Tallegio. Let it go longer if you like something funkier. If you want to hold the cheese, wrap it in cheese paper and put it a cooler fridge.

Each cheese should end up being a little over one pound.
« Last Edit: August 10, 2010, 05:44:06 AM by clherestian »