Author Topic: micrococci  (Read 2547 times)

Offline clherestian

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micrococci
« on: August 04, 2010, 06:02:16 AM »
Does anyone know what micrococci is and what it does? American Farmstead Cheese says it is used "to promote surface growth and aroma in washed-rind and natural rind cheese." I am looking for something more specific, Is it a yeast? What does it do chemically? What does it do to flavor? I read somewhere that it degrades caesin, but what does it produce? How does it work with b. linens?

Thanks again for answering my questions.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2010, 12:05:35 PM by clherestian »


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Offline Mr. Kim

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Re: micrococci
« Reply #1 on: August 04, 2010, 01:12:17 PM »
From the Dairy Journal:

The secondary flora of cheese contain several kinds of microorganisms including micrococci and pediococci. Micrococci constitute a major portion of the raw milk flora; some thermoduric micrococci survive pasteurization and occur in cheese made from pasteurized milk. Micrococci  or pediococci present naturally in cheese milk or added deliberately sometimes improve the flavor and enhance its development in Cheddar cheese. The beneficial role of these bacteria has been related to their proteolytic, lipotyric, and esterolyric activities and to some metabolites produced by them during the ripening process. Their possible use as agents for accelerated ripening of cheese and their advantages and disadvantages for this purpose are described.

Hope this helps.
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Re: micrococci
« Reply #2 on: August 04, 2010, 04:57:59 PM »
Does anyone know what micrococci is and what it does? American Farmstead Cheese says it is used "to promote surface growth and aroma in washed-rind and natural rind cheese." I am looking for something more specific, Is it a yeast?


No. It is one of several gram+ bacteria belonging to the Micrococcaceae family and either the Micrococcus genus or the Staphylococcus genus. In the Staph genus, it's usually S xylosus, although I've also seen S carnosus.

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What does it do chemically?


Noms curd and releases enzymes to break it down, and noms the hydrolyzed proteins. It's a hungry, hungry beast.
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What does it do to flavor?


Gives a smelly, pungent sort of aroma and softens paste. You can use S xylosus alone, for example, to create a lovely cheese with a light-red rind resembling a limberger. There are a few smear cheeses with xylosus as the primary rind ripener, don't recall offhand which.
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I read somewhere that it degrades caesin, but what does it produce?


Yep, sure does. Broken down as1, as2, b proteins make all sorts of peptide chains (soft cheese paste) with an associated smelliness. Also very strong oligopeptide catabolysis (secondary proteolysis to release more complex, smaller peptide chains). Do you want a list of the peptides or an SDS PAGE? That varies with strain.

They're also used extensively in cured meat production to create characteristic salami flavors, like for the salami made in Naples.


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How does it work with b. linens?


As a primary and secondary ripening agent that doesn't consume lactose/lactate. It's like using mycodore and mycoderm together, it adds dimension and aroma because the enzymes target different spots on the milk caseins. One cool application, for example, is to pick a mild b linens that tends to produce a lot of buttery notes, and complement it with a Micrococcus that produces a red rind and complex smelly notes. You'll get lovely soft paste without too much goo, a great color that's appetizing, very layered flavors in the paste, and an aroma that is not unidimensionally "stinky"

Take a look at http://aem.asm.org/cgi/content/short/74/1/172  for some more discussions of the complex interactions possible.
« Last Edit: August 04, 2010, 05:19:13 PM by linuxboy »
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Offline clherestian

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Re: micrococci
« Reply #3 on: August 05, 2010, 06:24:55 AM »
Wow, that is exactly what I was looking for. You are awesome. One more question. You mention a b linen with buttery notes. Do you have any suggestions as to which product that would be? I am currently using Danisco's SR3.

Offline Mr. Kim

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Re: micrococci
« Reply #4 on: August 05, 2010, 08:10:31 AM »
linuxboy, you are just astounding.  Where did you get all your knowledge?
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Online linuxboy

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Re: micrococci
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2010, 09:40:08 AM »
Wow, that is exactly what I was looking for. You are awesome. One more question. You mention a b linen with buttery notes. Do you have any suggestions as to which product that would be? I am currently using Danisco's SR3.
CHR Hansen's BC, Cargill's BL IC, or Danisco's LB. I don't have Danisco's exact flavor profile, I do recall LB being a lot lighter and it appeared slower. I use BC in tomme (in the milk) to give it milky flavor notes and soften the paste, and prevent typical smear rind formation by using mold on the rind and not washing. It's a pretty cool trick you can use in a lot of cheese. B linens isn't just for smear rinds.

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Where did you get all your knowledge?
Lots of time spent in the library :)
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Re: micrococci
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2010, 11:24:30 AM »
CHR Hansen's BC. I use BC in tomme (in the milk) to give it milky flavor notes and soften the paste, and prevent typical smear rind formation by using mold on the rind and not washing. It's a pretty cool trick you can use in a lot of cheese. B linens isn't just for smear rinds.
That sounds like what I wanted to get when I did my Esrom. Do you have a recipe you'd be willing to share using this technique with the BC?

I'm currently using Danisco's Choozit LR.

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Online linuxboy

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Re: micrococci
« Reply #7 on: August 05, 2010, 11:29:26 AM »
Be happy to, but no time until November :(. It's about 15 hours of writing and verifying to give exact instructions, and then an edit pass.
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Re: micrococci
« Reply #8 on: August 06, 2010, 01:49:36 AM »
Be happy to, but no time until November :(. It's about 15 hours of writing and verifying to give exact instructions, and then an edit pass.
Understand full well. The downside to all that time spent in the library is that everyone wants a slice of your time. Thanks for all you do.

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