Author Topic: help with ph targets on recipe  (Read 798 times)

Offline clherestian

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Posts: 117
  • Cheeses: 4
  • Default personal text
help with ph targets on recipe
« on: October 01, 2010, 01:29:01 PM »
I have been making this recipe for a year or so:

http://www.dairyfoodsconsulting.com/recipes_Tallegio.shtml

The problem is that the results are a little different every time. The rind develops the way I want it every time, but not the paste. The texture varies a bit from make to make. I think it would help me be more consistent if the recipe had more ph tagets. The only ph taget it has is that at 5.3 cheese are removed from the draining area.

Is there any one that can give me ph targets at some of the critical points? They don't have to be exact, just some general guidelines.

For example, what should ph be at time of whey drain/hooping? The recipe just says to wait 5 minutes after cutting, but without a ph target, how do I know if I added the correct amount of starter?

What should ph be at time of adding rennet?

Also, how will moving ph at these critical points affect the final paste?

Also, I have another random question. The recipe calls for TA050 (Streptococcus thermophilus). What happens if I use Abiasa's Thermophile Type C  (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactococcus helveticus) instead?


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,977
  • Cheeses: 197
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Re: help with ph targets on recipe
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2010, 03:17:57 PM »
Absolutely, #1 determinant of paste is pH when you scoop the curds, and to a lesser degree, pH at  renneting.

What paste are you targetting? How runny? pH values are not absolute, they are used to help target specific cheese attributes?

Usually, tallegio is rennetted at 6.4 (Peter's 30-minute window for pre-ripening is too short unless the milk is old or you are making it from goat milk), and scooped at 6.2-6.25. This gives you enough runniness but not too much. You need a PF target of about .85-.9 in the milk. If you have a higher PF, say .95 or 1, it will be more runny.
 
Quote

Also, how will moving ph at these critical points affect the final paste?
pH at scoop is most important. Higher pH at scoop = more colloidal calcium in the micelles = more stable and firm paste.

Quote
What happens if I use Abiasa's Thermophile Type C

You will get a different flavor, slightly sweeter. pH curve will be slower, too.
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline clherestian

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Posts: 117
  • Cheeses: 4
  • Default personal text
Re: help with ph targets on recipe
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2010, 07:34:45 AM »
Thanks, LB. That is enough info for me to work with.

One more question. You mentioned that Thermo Type C will give a slower ph curve. Assuming I rennet and scoop at the same ph, will a slower ph curve have any effect on texture?

Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,977
  • Cheeses: 197
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Re: help with ph targets on recipe
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2010, 12:09:10 AM »
Yep, because you have to coincide your drain target with the pH target for the end of drain. Part of that is the curd strength per your floc multiplier, but part of that is also the press weight, and the time it drains. For this cheese style, it does reach equilibrium after 6-12 hours of draining, and your pH has to be right at that end for best results.
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.