Author Topic: Licensing - USA  (Read 9602 times)

Offline Wayne Harris

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Re: Licensing - USA
« Reply #45 on: September 21, 2009, 11:34:56 AM »
I will do so, and let everyone know the results
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Offline Stuart

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Re: Licensing - USA
« Reply #46 on: September 21, 2009, 11:41:25 AM »
I mentioned wanting to sell cheese to my father, who is an attorney. He said that his church gives sandwiches away to homeless people and that the health department approved it as long as they have a sign up saying they are not produced in a commercial kitchen.

I know selling is different than giving away, but I'm curious if I'd be able to do that at a farmer's market... I'll let you guys know what I find out. There is a pretty awesome farmer's market close to my house on Saturdays and Thursdays.
I don't make cheese because it is easy. I make cheese because it is hard.

Offline Christy

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Re: Licensing - USA
« Reply #47 on: September 21, 2009, 12:27:29 PM »
There are strict regulations surrounding the sale of dairy products. Your production must comply with state dairy ordinances and licensing, and you must supply the market management with documentation of such compliance.

However, it might not be that hard to get licensed. If you are buying grade A milk you don't have to worry about licensing a dairy just a processing plant. Most likely you will need a kitchen away from you living area and a separate bathroom not for household use, a three compartment sink and a hand wash sink. Check with your state dairy board for more info.

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Offline Christy

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Re: Licensing - USA
« Reply #48 on: September 21, 2009, 04:44:24 PM »
I went back and read the earlier pages of this thread. Gee, I hate to sound like such a stickler for the rules but people do get caught. Last year a lady was ‘busted’ by the State for selling herbed butters at my farmers market in small town Kansas. They didn’t do anything, just told her to stop selling it.

That is nothing compared to what happened to another woman I know. A few years ago she was taking hard cheeses to the Kansas City farmers market and making a full out killing! When they busted her they took all of her equipment and her cows!!!

Since I want to be legal someday I don’t want to do anything to compromise my business or my goats :)

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Offline Ziggy

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Re: Licensing - USA
« Reply #49 on: September 21, 2009, 06:52:40 PM »
The other problem with not being legal is if someone get sick (or claims they did) from eating your cheese you are looking at loosing everything whether you win in court or not (legal fe$$), and if you are unlicensed it is any legal proceeding against you it is  another bad mark against you.

I dont think there is any insurance company out there that will cover an unlicensed operation.
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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Licensing - USA
« Reply #50 on: September 22, 2009, 12:04:49 AM »
I mentioned wanting to sell cheese to my father, who is an attorney. He said that his church gives sandwiches away to homeless people and that the health department approved it as long as they have a sign up saying they are not produced in a commercial kitchen.

I know selling is different than giving away, but I'm curious if I'd be able to do that at a farmer's market... I'll let you guys know what I find out. There is a pretty awesome farmer's market close to my house on Saturdays and Thursdays.

Not sure about your location, but here on the west coast, dairy sales are governed by different statutes than sales or giving away of regular food. If you were to buy your cheese from a licensed dairy or processor, and then sell it without intervening modification, that may be OK. But if you touch or modify at any stage, then you are governed by state regs, as well as federal regs. I'm not an attorney, but that's what I heard from multiple people.
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Offline MiaBella Farm

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Re: Licensing - USA
« Reply #51 on: September 22, 2009, 07:52:44 AM »
michelle if the state takes over, i assume it will be for all states? and how will that be better?
wayne i'm sure there are some artisan cheese makers in ohio. i think they are your best bet to get information.
i would love to sell cheese too. it is the first step that is the hardest ;)

I have no idea if ALL states will move the cheese regulations from county to state, I only know about Texas and it will be better because our state inspector is not as big of a stickler as our county inspector.  I currently have a good relationship with our state inspector.

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Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Licensing - USA
« Reply #52 on: September 22, 2009, 09:43:48 AM »
Kentucky government officials had a meeting yesterday. The topic was how to encourage more artisan cheesemakers while not loosening the existing regulations. A bureaucratic Catch 22 - especially for raw milk producers.
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