Author Topic: Annatto  (Read 4972 times)

Offline Wayne Harris

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Annatto
« on: November 29, 2008, 11:55:05 AM »
I have noticed that most cheese recipes (except for those in the colby and cheddar families) rarely call for the addition of annatto.  I have made several recipes of havarti, and gouda, and they are VERY white.   

I just got back from the store, and picked up several high-end gouda cheeses. (for research only..... )
 (Beemster).  They all seem to list annatto in their ingredients.

I am not sure what everyone else's thoughts are, but from this point on, I plan to add just enough annatto to give my gouda a light cream color. 
Thoughts?

Wayne A. Harris - in vino veritas


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Offline Tea

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Re: Annatto
« Reply #1 on: November 29, 2008, 02:30:24 PM »
From what I have read, annatto is for colour only and does not add any flavour, and is to be used at your own discretion.  My book says that it can be added at a rate ranging from .5ml per 10lt up to 5ml per 10lt for a deep red colour and added with the culture.
Go for it, and see what you get.

Offline John (CH)

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Re: Annatto
« Reply #2 on: November 30, 2008, 05:59:39 AM »
I've seen Annatto in powdered form in local Mexican oriented Fiesta Grocery store but have yet to try it, and while the colouring is psychological I think it works and also enables some variety in colour. FYI I visited a Beemster retail store while in NL and posted some pics here.

Offline Wayne Harris

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Re: Annatto
« Reply #3 on: November 30, 2008, 08:41:17 AM »
This adds no real value to the discussion, but I happened to snap a picture of my son adding annatto to this morning's cheddar production.
Wayne A. Harris - in vino veritas

Offline Tea

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Re: Annatto
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2008, 02:21:37 PM »
Hey great to see the next generation getting into the act.  Some of my daughters are just beginning to express interest, and my eldest son (22) was reading my cheese book the other day, and said, "lot of interesting information in there hey!" 
So I live in hope.

I was also going to add that I think liquid annatto would be easier to incorporate than powdered.
Keep the photo's coming, I love them.


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Offline Likesspace

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Re: Annatto
« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2008, 09:25:16 PM »
Hi guys,
I've been using liquid Annatto in any recipe where a yellow color is desirable.
I buy mine from The Dairy Connection and it really is a nice product.
Previously I purchased from leeners and found it to be a really weak product. You are only supposed to add about two to three drops per gallon of milk but I saw absolutely no color change following this procedure.
It may be that I simply got a bad bottle or I might possibly could have been using it wrong. Regardless, I have had great success using the Annatto I bought from the above listed source.
Their double strength Annatto works perfectly. I typically use about 1/16 tsp. per two gallon batch and get a really nice orange/yellow color. I also bought a pint of this product for just a little more than a two ounce bottle on the other site.
I have this thing about eating things that don't look as they should.
If I'm eating a cheddar I really need it to be yellow.
I remember a few years ago, there was this green ketchup that became popular in the states. My kids loved it, but I couldn't go near it.
I tasted it once and have to say that it tasted the same as regular red ketchup. My problem was dipping a perfectly good french fry in something that looked so nasty.
Even though it might not be totally natural, the cheese I've always eaten has a yellow color (with some exceptions).  Because of that, I want my cheese to be the same.
Oh, one more thing....
From what I've read, certain milk from certain cows at certain times of the year, did produce a nice yellow/orange color. The quality of the milk, used, could be judged from the finished cheese color.
Now it would be really nice to be able to produce a natural yellow color to my cheese from my milk source but since mine comes from the local IGA store, I don't see that as an option. Becasue of that, Annatto is the answer.
Besides, I got really tired of hearing my kids say "Why is your cheese WHITE?!?" :(

Dave

Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Annatto
« Reply #6 on: December 16, 2008, 04:17:15 AM »
Like, I totally agree although I love Tillamook Cheddar I can't eat their white cheddar, it's just weird.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline martyd215

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Re: Annatto
« Reply #7 on: February 05, 2009, 04:22:38 AM »
Hey guys.

I'm a bit new to everything, and I recently bought some annatto and have attempted to use it in cheddar making. The directions on the bottle and in the recipe both say to use two drops dissolved in a bit of water to every gallon of milk.

Is this right? When I did this and mixed it in, I only noticed the slightest change in color. Does the color get deeper with age? It's one of the few moments when I've been making cheese where I've been puzzled for days. I made a second cheddar tonight (well, it's still pressing) and probably used a milliliter or so of the annatto to two gallons of milk to see if anything would turn out different. The curd is now an off-white but it definitely doesn't resemble the yellow in any cheddar I'm used to.

Anyway, just hope someone can steer me to the right answer. Thanks.

Offline John (CH)

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Re: Annatto
« Reply #8 on: February 05, 2009, 06:16:16 AM »
Carter, where is yours from?

I also just ordered some and a bunch of other kit from CheeseMaking.com, will let you know how good it is.

Offline Wayne Harris

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Re: Annatto
« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2009, 07:28:58 AM »
Well, my understanding is that the color attaches itself to the fat in the curd.  It will be very diluted during ripening.  You should, however,  see a concentration of the color after you separate the whey and work with the curd only. (milling, pressing)

I add 4-5 drops per gallon for my cheddars.  I like a deep rich yellow.  (just a preference)

I add 1-2 drops per gallon for my Havarti or Goudas for a slight creamy color.


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Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Annatto
« Reply #10 on: February 05, 2009, 09:51:51 PM »
Mine's from the cheesemaker.com.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline John (CH)

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Re: Annatto
« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2009, 10:50:20 PM »
Carter thanks, sorry I miss typed, I meant to ask marty215 as his was the post that had very little color effect.

marty, where did you get yours?

Offline martyd215

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Re: Annatto
« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2009, 10:21:38 AM »
I got mine from a local store that sells brewery supplies but they also stock a few cheesemaking supplies; they get all of their stuff from www.cheesemaking.com so it should be a reasonable quality product, right? Or ought to be at least. The liquid itself has a very deep color but when I added it last I really noticed very little change in the color.

Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Annatto
« Reply #13 on: February 11, 2009, 01:48:27 PM »
Marty it doesn't change the color much during the making. It dies the fat so when the whey is removed it will have a deeper color.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline rockie900

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Re: Annatto
« Reply #14 on: February 11, 2009, 05:31:09 PM »
Its sort of an orange colour when the whey is removed and gets darker when it dries out.
Oh and it changes the whey too, I made some ricotta out of whey the other day and it was orange.

Al