Author Topic: Air circulation  (Read 1032 times)

Offline Cartierusm

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Air circulation
« on: December 10, 2008, 01:47:24 PM »
How much air circulation does aging cheese need, if any. Most books I have talk about using a spare refrigerator to age cheese in so air circulation must not play too big a part. The reason I'm asking is I'm going to be individually humidifying and storing cheese within the frig for the initial aging and ripening. For long term it will either be waxed and in my wine cellar or wrapped and stored in the regular refrigerator.

So when I'm ripening blue cheese do I need to open the container once a day and let it breathe for a few seconds or should I just leave it as long as it's not soaking wet and the correct humidity is being regulated?
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Offline John (CH)

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Re: Air circulation
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2008, 04:57:43 PM »
Carterusm, sounds like a good plan. Based on my limited experience I don't think you need to vent your fridge very often. For your blue cheese, I assume you have a separate container as it's mold is very contagious to other cheeses! But, I've found that a sealed container holds too much humidity, especially in the early stages when drying the cheese.

Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Air circulation
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2008, 07:38:49 PM »
Yes I use a separate container. I'm thinking of building a couple of maple boxes to use instead of tupperware so there is a minisucle amount of air exchange from the wood.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline Tea

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Re: Air circulation
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2008, 04:47:41 PM »
Cheeses were originally matured in cellars, so while there would have been some air movement, it would have been minimal, I would think.  When drying a product it is necessary for good air flow, but as long as it is not stale air, I don't think that  large volumes of air exchange it vitally important in maturing cheese.  Especially not in the numbers that we would be making.  Maybe when it came to a commercial setup with numerous cheeses drying, that might be a different thing all together.

If you are wanting to create an air flow in your "cave" you could try a small battery operated fan for 1/2 an hour or so, a couple of times a day, and see if that gives you what you are hoping to achieve.