Author Topic: Cheddar mold  (Read 1864 times)

Offline Wayne Harris

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Cheddar mold
« on: December 14, 2008, 01:22:16 PM »
I had some mold get under my waxed cheddar.  There were some seams in the wax where the cheese was actually exposed. (hairline seam)

Not a big deal,  I simply removed the wax, trimmed the cheddar, and sealed in a vacuum sealed bag.

This cheese is 2 months old.

OMG it was good.

I almost don't want to wait 4 more months.



Wayne A. Harris - in vino veritas


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Offline John (CH)

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Re: Cheddar mold
« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2008, 01:43:59 PM »
Howdy Wayne

Great to hear that it's working out well, the problem with vacuum bags is you can unseal, cut chunk off an reseal, awful ;)!

Offline Wayne Harris

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Re: Cheddar mold
« Reply #2 on: December 14, 2008, 05:45:10 PM »
Look what you made me do.
Wayne A. Harris - in vino veritas

Offline Tea

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Re: Cheddar mold
« Reply #3 on: December 15, 2008, 03:45:03 PM »
lol, I bet it went down well though!

Offline John (CH)

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Re: Cheddar mold
« Reply #4 on: December 15, 2008, 06:11:21 PM »
Quote
I simply removed the wax, trimmed the cheddar, and sealed in a vacuum sealed bag.

Some trimming, like when I go to barber and ask for little short ;D!

1/4 down at 2 months, 3/4 left to get to your 6 month target . . .


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Offline Wayne Harris

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Re: Cheddar mold
« Reply #5 on: December 15, 2008, 07:25:13 PM »
It tasted great.

I hope it makes it to 6 months.



Wayne A. Harris - in vino veritas

Offline Tea

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Re: Cheddar mold
« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2008, 01:59:05 PM »
That's why I prefer waxing.  It makes you think twice before cutting into a cheese.

Offline Likesspace

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Re: Cheddar mold
« Reply #7 on: December 17, 2008, 09:40:10 PM »
I agree with you Tea...
Once I have a wheel waxed and in the fridge I have no problem letting it sit and age properly.
On the other hand, I now have two Camemberts wrapped and four more waiting for the mold to form. I'm really wanting to give one of them a try even though they are only two weeks old.
I also have a Stilton that is only 3 weeks old and it's killing me not to give it a try. This is my first attempt at a blue (and it's also my first attempt at making Camembert) so I'm dying to know how they are maturing.
I plan on cracking half of the Stilton either on Christmas Eve or New years eve. I'll then wrap the rest in foil and leave it to age properly.
For any of you you have made Stilton, can you tell me what to expect from a blue that is only a month old? If it's going to be less than satisfactory, I will go ahead and let it age to the proper 60 days.
I've had my blue mold for nearly two years, but always avoided using it. I was basically afraid that I would contaminate my other aging cheeses, since I only had one cave.
Now that I have two caves and I've given it a try, I have another Stilton in the mold and am flipping it daily. My plans now are to keep one going every two weeks.
I've dedicated one of my cheese caves (wine fridge) to blues. That way my fear of cross contamination doesn't really come into play.
I really hope that these cheeses turns out so that I can add a couple of more successes to my resume.
I absolutely love new experiences when it comes to cheesemaking.

Dave

Offline Brian

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Re: Cheddar mold
« Reply #8 on: December 29, 2008, 10:50:33 PM »
I've dedicated one of my cheese caves (wine fridge) to blues. That way my fear of cross contamination doesn't really come into play.

Yep.  The first time I made cheese I had 7 assorted cheeses going and a Stilton.  It made everything taste like bleu cheese.

B

Offline Likesspace

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Re: Cheddar mold
« Reply #9 on: December 30, 2008, 10:03:55 PM »
Brian,
The P. Roq. is a very aggressive mold. At some point I was slovenly in my personal hygiene and ended up with a blue provolone as my reward.
I must have given my Stilton a flip and then went straight to the provolone without washing my hands well. Fortunately I was able to trim the blue off of the surface of the provolone and still end up with a very nice cheese.
Stilton has become just about my favorite home made cheese. Every step of the process is fun. Camembert is quickly becoming my second favorite but I still have some issues to work out on that one.
I guess it's only a matter of time before I give the washed rind cheeses a try. I have the B. Linens but I've so far been afraid to use them. I love Muenster but I'd hate for a Gouda to turn out tasting (or smelling) like a Limburger.

Dave


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beeman

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Re: Cheddar mold
« Reply #10 on: December 31, 2008, 10:16:18 AM »
For any of you you have made Stilton, can you tell me what to expect from a blue that is only a month old? If it's going to be less than satisfactory, I will go ahead and let it age to the proper 60 days.Dave


Might I suggest a visit to <http://www.stiltoncheese.com/UK/other/videos.cfm> there is an excellent video on Stilton cheese making from the experts.
Having studied the recipes I note a number of discrepancies when viewed against the video.
I see no reference to the size and method of moulding. Stilton mould heights are at least two times the diameter, which surely must have an effect on whey expulsion.
Then I note there is no discussion on 'smoothing' and often piercing is done at 'unmoulding' rather than at 5 weeks, which is the 'experts' timing.
Finally they talk of 12 weeks aging, that's a total of 84 days!
Discussion anyone?

beeman

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Re: Cheddar mold
« Reply #11 on: December 31, 2008, 10:34:13 AM »
Brian,
The P. Roq. is a very aggressive mold. At some point I was slovenly in my personal hygiene and ended up with a blue provolone as my reward.
I must have given my Stilton a flip and then went straight to the provolone without washing my hands well. Fortunately I was able to trim the blue off of the surface of the provolone and still end up with a very nice cheese.
Stilton has become just about my favorite home made cheese. Every step of the process is fun.
Dave

I too am keen on making Stilton, when I get started, but am trying to pin down this 'blue' cross contamination. So, info please.
Did your contamination occur by hand only or is air contamination possible? In other words is it possible to have the cheeses open in the cave? Provided they're not handled they won't cross over.
I have a large cheese cave planned, part of a walled off part of my basement, 8x5 feet with extensive shelves, used to store my wine, perfect temp. If I had blue at one side and other cheeses at the other end, am I likely to get contamination?
Discussion please.

Offline Likesspace

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Re: Cheddar mold
« Reply #12 on: December 31, 2008, 12:29:06 PM »
Beeman,
In my particular case, I'm positive the cross contamination came from touching. I had the stilton in a dedicated wine fridge and the provolone was in a completely different room, hanging inside of a container.
As for the Stilton making site you suggested, I have visited that site many times. I'm also trying to make the perfect Stilton and feel I am getting closer with each attempt.
On my last batch, I did give the cheese a very smooth surface upon removing it from the mold and this is causing a very nice rind to form.
I am also going to wait until the 4 week mark to pierce the cheese instead of doing so upon unmolding (as I did the last time).
The reason I'm not going to follow the Stilton sites instructions to the letter is because I am making a much smaller wheel than is commonly produced.
After molding, my wheel measures 4" diameter x 7" - 8" tall.
I made a lot of mistakes on my first attempt (not smoothing the sides, piercing too early, piercing too much and eating too young). Regardless the flavor and texture was absolutely fantastic, even though it was an ugly little thing.
Now back to the subject of cross contamination....
When I decided to make my first blue, I bought a wine fridge that I could dedicate to this one variety.
From what I understand, the biggest threat comes from actually spreading the mold through touching, although some claim airborne contamination has happend to them as well.
I have no experience with airborne contamination but I do feel that it could happen, especially in a small space. This mold really is very aggressive.
Keep us posted on your progress and please share any information you pick up along the way. So far this seems to be a pretty easy cheese to make or at least you get good results even if mistakes are made.

Dave

Offline Tea

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Re: Cheddar mold
« Reply #13 on: December 31, 2008, 02:32:06 PM »
Lol Likesspace, I did the same with my provolone while turning the brie.  Ended up with white mould spots all over the provolone.  I just oiled it a couple of times and got rid of the mould.