Author Topic: how to milk a new ewe  (Read 3487 times)

Offline Tiarella

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Re: how to milk a new ewe
« Reply #15 on: February 23, 2013, 02:59:24 PM »
Thanks for explaining.  We just started with another use for Bag Balm and that's to help keep the Henry Milker teat cup tightly air-sealed when milking during the end of the lactation when the udder isn't as full.  I just smear a tiny bit around the rim to help it seal.  Especially helpful if there's any chapping of the udder that is causing more air leaks.


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Offline Wendy

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Re: how to milk a new ewe
« Reply #16 on: February 23, 2013, 03:55:36 PM »
A good thing to try on a new milking animal that may have a congested bag (udder), is a very warm compress before milking.  This really helps  the milk that has congested be less painful. And is much easier to milk out.    Remember to dry the udder off before milking.

Offline Woolie

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Re: how to milk a new ewe
« Reply #17 on: February 23, 2013, 10:25:20 PM »
I have a Dorper ewes and I find that bag balm works wonders.  I have read that there are ingredients that sooth and help open up the udder.  I also think that massaging it on before helps relax the ewe and gets them to relax.  I also massage the udder then almost all the milk has been milked out.  My ewe has really calmed down and now seems to enjoy it.  She's also a kicker and I milk into a small bowl with a handle and transfer it into a mason jar.  Even though she's really good now, it helps to be on the safe side.  I find that it also helps that she can see her lamb.  Stripe is extremely maternal and if her baby is in sight she is much calmer.  Dorper's have extremely strong mothering insticts so she worries if she can't see her baby.

Offline proturf

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Re: how to milk a new ewe
« Reply #18 on: February 24, 2013, 07:19:30 PM »
I know this is drifting off of the thread topic......  but, take a look at this photo and tell me if this is really the looks of a "Dorper"?  It looks like a cross with Texel and then backcrossed into Dorper.  I know that the Dorper around here don't look like that anyway!!!!


Offline snofields

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Re: how to milk a new ewe
« Reply #19 on: February 25, 2013, 12:28:53 PM »
I have found breaking down the milking in to small training steps to be helpful.  First, ewe comes in to milk parlour for grain, then she has to get into position with headlock for grain, next I touch bag and teats while she eats.   My first milking is short, maybe 1/4-1/2 of her milk.  I try to quit before she gets nervous or agitated, but I don't release her till she stands quietly if she gets jumpy.  This sounds like a long process but takes a week or less and the ewes are very comfortable with being milked.  Like training any animal, teach one short thing at a time.


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Offline Woolie

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Re: how to milk a new ewe
« Reply #20 on: February 26, 2013, 04:54:26 PM »
Proturf, that looks like a purebred or full blood Dorper.  Since the ram is shaved, I doubt anyone would go to the trouble  to do it unless it was a show sheep.