Author Topic: Mozzarella, Unripened - No Curd Formation  (Read 1210 times)

Offline debiso

  • New Cheese
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Cheeses: 0
  • Default personal text
Mozzarella, Unripened - No Curd Formation
« on: December 01, 2010, 07:27:33 PM »
I am trying to make fresh mozzarella.  I used the following recipe.  I followed it exactly twice with the same results.  What could I be doing wrong?  The curd never forms.  I get a tiny bit floating on top but maybe only a tablespoon worth.  What's up with this?

Joe

Homemade fresh mozzarella cheese has fabulous flavor. The instructions here for making your own at home are detailed but not difficult. Rennet and citric acid can be found in health food stores and specialty markets.
Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 20 minutes

Total Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients:

1/2 rennet tablet
1/4 cup cool, chlorine-free water (most bottled waters are chlorine-free)
1 gallon milk (2%, 1%, or skim)
2 teaspoons citric acid
Salt, optional
Preparation:

Crush the rennet into the water and stir to dissolve. Pour milk into a non-reactive pot (no aluminum or cast iron). Place over medium heat. Sprinkle the citric acid over the milk and stir a few times. Heat milk to 88 degrees F. Milk will begin to curdle.

At 88 degrees F, add the rennet solution and continue stirring slowly every few minutes until the milk reaches 105 degrees F. Turn off the heat. Large curds will appear and begin to separate from the whey (the clear, greenish liquid).

With a slotted spoon or mesh strainer, scoop the curd into a large glass bowl. (If it's still too liquid, let it set for a few more minutes). Press the curds gently with your hand and pour off as much whey as possible. Microwave curds on high for 1 minute, then drain off all the excess whey. With a spoon, press curds into a ball until cool. Microwave two more times for 35 seconds each, and continue to drain the whey and work cheese into a ball. In the meantime, place the whey over medium heat and let it heat to about 175 degrees F.

When cheese is cool enough to touch, knead it like bread dough until smooth. When you can stretch it like taffy, it is done. You can sprinkle 1 to 2 teaspoons salt into the cheese while kneading and stretching it. The cheese will become stretchy, smooth and shiny. If it is difficult to stretch and breaks easily, dip it into the hot whey for a few seconds to make it warm and pliable. Then pick it up again and stretch it into a long rope. Fold over and stretch again. Dip in hot whey as needed to make the cheese pliable.

When the cheese is smooth and shiny (this takes just a few minutes), it is ready to eat. Shape it into a log or golf-size balls, then store in a solution of 2 teaspoons salt to 1 cup water.

Note: Citric acid and rennet are available through mail order, some pharmacies or health food stores.


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline morfeo

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: United states
  • Posts: 70
  • Cheeses: 3
  • there is nothing better than cheese and wine
Re: Mozzarella, Unripened - No Curd Formation
« Reply #1 on: December 01, 2010, 08:37:05 PM »
Hi-
I think you problem is that you are using 2% or 1% milk, I have done mozzarella and I always use whole milk. I'm not completely shire that is your problem but I never seen a recipe for mozzarella with that milk, and depending on the milk you are buying you may want to add calcium chloride it will help to firm up the curd.
Calcium chlorine is use to restore the calcium lost during the pasteurizing process.
On this link you will find this in more detail, and when to use calcium chloride depending on the type of milk you are using

http://www.cheesemaking.com/store/pg/239-FAQ-Cheesemaking-and-Milk.html

Offline RogerWilco

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: West Virginia
  • Posts: 31
  • Cheeses: 3
  • Default personal text
Re: Mozzarella, Unripened - No Curd Formation
« Reply #2 on: December 01, 2010, 09:33:05 PM »
I am new to hard cheeses, but I am quite familiar with the "30 minute Mozzarella." First off, use whole milk. Secondly, I add lipase to my fresh mozz. Here is another problem:

At 88 degrees F, add the rennet solution and continue stirring slowly every few minutes until the milk reaches 105 degrees F. Turn off the heat. Large curds will appear and begin to separate from the whey (the clear, greenish liquid). 

Search the forum for flocculation to learn more about this. Stirring the curd every few minutes will prevent the rennet from forming a firm curd and achieving a clean break. Add the rennet, stir 1 minute, then LET IT BE STILL. Once you have a firm curd, cut it as per directions to expel whey, let heal, and proceed.

Offline MrsKK

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Wisconsin
  • Posts: 1,860
  • Cheeses: 61
  • Default personal text
Re: Mozzarella, Unripened - No Curd Formation
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2010, 09:20:33 AM »
Another issue I see is "Sprinkle the citric acid over the milk and stir a few times"  This will not allow the citric acid to be distributed throughout the milk.  I'm suspecting that it is hanging around in the top layer of milk and that's why you only get a bit of curd in the top of the pot.

It would be better to dissolve the citric acid in 1/4 cup cool water then stir it into the milk thoroughly...but be gentle.  Once you've stirred for about 20-30 seconds, turn your spoon/skimmer so that the "bowl" of the spoon is cross-wise to the flow of the milk, to stop the milk from moving.  Use the same method, 20-30 seconds of gentle stirring, then stop the milk, when you stir in the rennet.  Maintain the temperature, but don't stir the curd, as it will just break up, leaving you with milky whey.  Once the curd has set to clean break, you can cut it into 1 inch pieces, then allow the curd to heal for about 10 minutes.  After that, proceed with draining the curd and the rest of the recipe for stretching.

30 minute Mozzarella is one of those recipes that has many, many variations available out there, but not all the methods work very well.  Hang in there, once you get it to work you will really have a lot of fun stretching it.