Author Topic: Bryndza  (Read 7080 times)

Offline spalko

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: TN
  • Posts: 22
  • Cheeses: 5
  • Default personal text
    • Locust Grove Farm LLC
Bryndza
« on: January 15, 2011, 12:43:31 PM »
I'm trying to find a make recipe for Bryndza... anyone ever make this cheese before or have any idea where I can get more information on it... seems to be a less common cheese (or I am looking in all the wrong places).

Thanks oodles!
Sheri Palko, owner/manager Locust Grove Farm, Farmstead Sheep's Milk Cheeses
www.locustgrovefarm.net


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline John (CH)

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Katy, Houston, Texas, USA
  • Posts: 4,069
  • Cheeses: 60
Re: Bryndza
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2011, 01:59:23 PM »
Someone else was looking for Brinza which sounds like the same thing, unfortunately no recipe.

Offline dttorun

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Posts: 152
  • Cheeses: 4
  • Default personal text
Re: Bryndza
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2011, 02:37:24 PM »
This is the website I found. I hope it helps.
Tan
http://www.bryndzacheese.com/

Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,977
  • Cheeses: 197
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Re: Bryndza
« Reply #3 on: January 15, 2011, 06:23:30 PM »
Sheri, there are about 6-7 different variations of Brinza, starting with kazakhstan/Uzbekistan, and going all the way past the carpathians into Slovakia and Poland. Pretty familiar with all the styles, but they are very different cheeses with similar origins. Which are you trying to make? What do you want to know?
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline spalko

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: TN
  • Posts: 22
  • Cheeses: 5
  • Default personal text
    • Locust Grove Farm LLC
Re: Bryndza
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2011, 09:52:30 AM »
My father-in-law (now deceased) referred to Bryndza and have wanted for some time now to aquire more info about making it.  His parents were Slovak, so I am assuming it's the Slovak Bryndza he was referring to.  Crumbly without being too dry... technically a semi-soft cheese.  Some times consistency would even permit spreading.
I like to make less common cheeses (and make only sheep's milk cheeses), so have hit many dead ends when trying to find out any more about what goes in to making this cheese.

I have some of my father-in-laws other recipes... awesome!  But none for this cheese.  Oh the things I'd like to ask him if he were still around.

Any guidance appreciated... believe me I've scanned the internet and find very little.

Thanks
Sheri Palko, owner/manager Locust Grove Farm, Farmstead Sheep's Milk Cheeses
www.locustgrovefarm.net


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,977
  • Cheeses: 197
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Re: Bryndza
« Reply #5 on: January 17, 2011, 11:13:08 AM »
I have a few that might fit, Sheri. One I have to translate from Magyar, and one I've adapted to modern methods using DVI culture. And one that is straight Slovak, the way the factories make it there. I'll try and post them for you later this week. I have relatives who live on the other side of Slovakia, on the Ukraine side of the Carpathians. When I was there last, there was quite a lot of variation among the bryndzas. Everything from mild fresh and soft to a crumbly, firm, feta-like block. So you can use the basic recipes and work out which variant you like best.
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline spalko

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: TN
  • Posts: 22
  • Cheeses: 5
  • Default personal text
    • Locust Grove Farm LLC
Re: Bryndza
« Reply #6 on: January 17, 2011, 12:12:34 PM »
That would be fantastic!  Thank you!
I will toy with a few  this year and if I find one I really like I will let you know.
I am not going to start making cheese again until March (I usually start about now, but had to delay due to a health problem).  So I am very anxious to start making again...

I really want to add some new cheeses to my offerings.  I have been experimenting with both a wine dipped and a smoked, but like so many of my experiments, I simply haven't found "it" yet.  Although I think I'm getting close on the wine dipped combination.  I am into unique... don't want anything common.

I am beginning to get worried about our relocation... our new cave environments.
More cave space, more caves... all a plus.  But I know the aging will be different, so I am forcing myself to be creative and realize that change can be good.  I am NOT creative, but very anal - really doesn't make for a good cheesemaker, but I'm trying to expand my thought process.   :D

thanks again!
Sheri Palko, owner/manager Locust Grove Farm, Farmstead Sheep's Milk Cheeses
www.locustgrovefarm.net

Offline Brandnetel

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: New York City
  • Posts: 212
  • Cheeses: 9
Re: Bryndza
« Reply #7 on: January 17, 2011, 03:51:37 PM »

BRYNDZOVÉ HALUŠKY

Now, here is a dish that I definitely need to try! Potato dumplings, Bryndza cheese and bacon, mmmm . . . . . wonder if one can find such an ethnic specialty in the northeast of the US? New York has a lot of great immigrant communities and their restaurants, but I'm not sure I've ever seen a Slovak place.
尊凝乳攘乳漿
Revere the Curd, Expel the Whey

Offline KosherBaker

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Santa Monica, CA
  • Posts: 268
  • Cheeses: 15
  • Tinkerer
Re: Bryndza
« Reply #8 on: January 17, 2011, 11:53:46 PM »
One I have to translate from Magyar,
LB my ex is Hungarian, and she and I have stayed friends over the years. So if you need a translator, jut let me know. Although, it wouldn't surprise me if you spoke Hungarian as well. :)
Great wine in that country, very underrated.
Rudy

Offline fidorka

  • New Cheese
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Cheeses: 0
  • Default personal text
Re: Bryndza
« Reply #9 on: February 16, 2011, 09:16:52 AM »
[img width=500 height=375]
BRYNDZOVÉ HALUŠKY

Now, here is a dish that I definitely need to try! Potato dumplings, Bryndza cheese and bacon, mmmm . . . . . wonder if one can find such an ethnic specialty in the northeast of the US? New York has a lot of great immigrant communities and their restaurants, but I'm not sure I've ever seen a Slovak place.


Hi there, I am Slovakian and know in fact there are several Slovakian restaurants/shops in US, including New York. Unfortunately I can't help you with the addresses as I do not live in US but it is worth of searching in some slovak/czech forums. The restaurant and shops may be known as Czechoslovak (or czech and slovak) rather then just Slovak.

couple of places in NY:
kolibarestaurant.com/Home.htm
www.zlatapraha.cc

there is a huge CZ/SVK community in Chicago where there is more places offering the food you are looking for.
Not sure how the lovely bryndza tastes like overthere though... I used to make my own while living in Texas, using Feta cheese and cream cheese and sometimes a bit of sour cream as well :) not brilliant but it did the job when i had cravings  :P


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,977
  • Cheeses: 197
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Re: Bryndza
« Reply #10 on: April 19, 2011, 03:05:57 PM »
I haven't forgotten about this, I'm just too busy right now. The gist of it is:

culture: LD type (such as probat) 60% + l bulgaricus, l acidophilus (even blend) 30% + ST (such as danisco's 40 or 50 series) 10%.  Or use Feta B, it's pretty close.

MFFB:44-48%
FDB: 38%

Heat to 30C (+- 1C)
add culture, ripen to 6.6
Add rennet, time target to floc is 12 mins. 4x-5x multiplier
cut to 5-10 mm size curd.
Let sit around for 15-20 mins. Stir a few times to prevent lumping. Let sit another 10-15 mins
Drain the entire mass and put in molds. Keep the molds warm, not below 27C. Huge honkin' mess of curds, drain in large molds.
Let acidify either in the mold or take out of the mold and put in warm room. 20C, 70-80% RH. Do this for 1-4 days until cheese firms up. Target pH no higher than 5.2 before unmolding. Usually comes in at 4.2-4.6. If demolded, flip twice per day, whey will drain.

Salt, so final salt content does not exceed 3%. Cure further in a slightly cooler room around 18-20C. Flip, whey will keep draining.

Once cheese stabilizes, no more whey seepage, cold pack per usual cold storage routine, ~34F.

Can also salt the curds before pressing, but if doing that, do not salt more than 1%, and then rub salt later.

Basically, the approach is to use some lactobacilli for flavor and acid, and ferment this like a Stilton, and then eat.

Sheri, if confusing, please ask. That was my recipe shorthand.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2011, 03:57:13 PM by linuxboy »
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline Tomer1

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Israel
  • Posts: 1,655
  • Cheeses: 33
  • Default personal text
Re: Bryndza
« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2011, 05:28:25 PM »
Its a type of hand cheese which is usually unsalted,dry in texture and very bland.
Its eaten fresh (My mother which is on a permanent diet eats it since commerically its made "low fat" using skimed milk powder),
Its usually used as an ingridient for dairy foods, for example as a filling for ravioli type egg dough toped with caramelized onions or as a blintzes (blini) filling.

"ferment this like a Stilton"
What do you mean by that?
Amatuar winemaker,baker, cook and musician
not in any particular order.

Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,977
  • Cheeses: 197
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Re: Bryndza
« Reply #12 on: April 19, 2011, 05:54:03 PM »
Quote
Its a type of hand cheese which is usually unsalted,dry in texture and very bland.
That is just one of many variants. Slovak bryndza is most often salted. Either packed in salt in barrels, to where final salt is 5% or so, or brined, or dry salted.

Quote
What do you mean by that?
I already posted the answer in the description of the make: you cure in warm room, not a cave. Stilton is fermented for almost a week in the mold.
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline Tomer1

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Israel
  • Posts: 1,655
  • Cheeses: 33
  • Default personal text
Re: Bryndza
« Reply #13 on: April 19, 2011, 06:30:19 PM »
Ah I see,
I didnt look at it as "fermentation" since its very much retarted by 2.5-3.5% curd salting prior to molding but I guess yeah its fermenting but just very slowly.
Amatuar winemaker,baker, cook and musician
not in any particular order.

Offline dttorun

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Posts: 152
  • Cheeses: 4
  • Default personal text
Re: Bryndza
« Reply #14 on: April 19, 2011, 08:58:29 PM »

There is a local manufacturer of this cheese here in Toronto area. They sell as spread.
Not for Bryndza but their molds are interesting.
Tan

http://www.fatra.ca/product_en.htm