Author Topic: Bryndza  (Read 8229 times)

Offline Brandnetel

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Re: Bryndza
« Reply #15 on: April 19, 2011, 10:55:30 PM »

There is a local manufacturer of this cheese here in Toronto area. They sell as spread.
Not for Bryndza but their molds are interesting.
Tan

http://www.fatra.ca/product_en.htm




I'll have what he's having! No, srsly, what is that long stick thing in his other hand? The cheeses look very nice, especially the braided sheep's milk cheese. Mmmmmm.......
尊凝乳攘乳漿
Revere the Curd, Expel the Whey


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Offline dthelmers

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Re: Bryndza
« Reply #16 on: April 20, 2011, 08:14:38 AM »
I've seen cheeses like he's holding in many Flemish paintings and wondered what they were. Now I know. Where can I get molds like that? They're beautiful! Has anyone here molded cheese this way? The lamb would be perfect for Easter.
Dave in CT
Dave in CT

Offline Brandnetel

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Re: Bryndza
« Reply #17 on: April 20, 2011, 12:45:31 PM »


Sorry, could not resist. If you are over, say, 45, this may help.
尊凝乳攘乳漿
Revere the Curd, Expel the Whey

Offline towaofpowa

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Re: Bryndza
« Reply #18 on: August 05, 2011, 12:28:17 PM »
linuxboy,

I'm new to making cheese, but I love Slovakian plnotucna Bryndza. It's hard to find in America, though, so I really appreciate you putting in your shorthand recipe. Is that recipe for the Slovakian variant of Bryndza? If so, could you expand on your shorthand explanation? Many thanks!

Offline linuxboy

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Re: Bryndza
« Reply #19 on: August 05, 2011, 12:39:04 PM »
Yes, it is, actually translated from Slovak and then slightly modified to fit modern commercial pracrtices. It's pretty clear to me when I read it, so would really help me to know where you find it confusing.
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.


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Online ArnaudForestier

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Re: Bryndza
« Reply #20 on: January 04, 2012, 03:22:29 PM »
I haven't forgotten about this, I'm just too busy right now. The gist of it is:

culture: LD type (such as probat) 60% + l bulgaricus, l acidophilus (even blend) 30% + ST (such as danisco's 40 or 50 series) 10%.  Or use Feta B, it's pretty close.

MFFB:44-48%
FDB: 38%

Heat to 30C (+- 1C)
add culture, ripen to 6.6
Add rennet, time target to floc is 12 mins. 4x-5x multiplier
cut to 5-10 mm size curd.
Let sit around for 15-20 mins. Stir a few times to prevent lumping. Let sit another 10-15 mins
Drain the entire mass and put in molds. Keep the molds warm, not below 27C. Huge honkin' mess of curds, drain in large molds.
Let acidify either in the mold or take out of the mold and put in warm room. 20C, 70-80% RH. Do this for 1-4 days until cheese firms up. Target pH no higher than 5.2 before unmolding. Usually comes in at 4.2-4.6. If demolded, flip twice per day, whey will drain.

Salt, so final salt content does not exceed 3%. Cure further in a slightly cooler room around 18-20C. Flip, whey will keep draining.

Once cheese stabilizes, no more whey seepage, cold pack per usual cold storage routine, ~34F.

Can also salt the curds before pressing, but if doing that, do not salt more than 1%, and then rub salt later.

Basically, the approach is to use some lactobacilli for flavor and acid, and ferment this like a Stilton, and then eat.

Sheri, if confusing, please ask. That was my recipe shorthand.


Pav, sorry for hijacking your other thread.  Again, unsure where the one we buy when we go to the Polish deli comes from, but characteristics are smoothness, fairly dry but creamy and spreadable, some piquancy and decent saltiness.  Actually, does remind me of a chevre, a bit more moisture, more spreadable, and more pungency.  I don't recall much diacetyl, but I'd have to try it again with this note in mind - memory may have buried it under other flavors. 
- Paul

Offline linuxboy

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Re: Bryndza
« Reply #21 on: January 04, 2012, 03:25:36 PM »
Yep, it's a sort of thermo chevre. For more smoothness, rennet at 6.1. It's the extra ripening at the end and high moisture/high fat that give it good smoothness. Diacetyl will be buried underneath that thermo type of acidity and somewhat yogurt-y/feta-type nose.
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Online ArnaudForestier

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Re: Bryndza
« Reply #22 on: January 04, 2012, 05:29:47 PM »
Thanks Pav.  In addition to astounding me once again, you've made for one very happy 11 year old lad. :)
- Paul

Offline Lacom

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Re: Bryndza
« Reply #23 on: July 11, 2012, 12:55:07 AM »
Hi all,

Despite the warning that this topic is too old, I would like to find out if there is still interest in making the traditional slovakian bryndza. I have access to a government issued document that defines the process of making bryndza. This plus a personal observation (long time ago  :'( ) of how is bryndza made in common households may help interested cheesemakers to make this very traditional cheese.

The info is quite extensive and it will take a considerable effort to translate it from slovak (my native language, it gets a bit rusty though.

The information given here is pretty good but omits one of the most important finishing process which is grinding and kneading the ripened feta - that (along with not using brining at all) is what it makes it so unique from other fetas of central and eastern Europe.

Cheers.

Offline linuxboy

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Re: Bryndza
« Reply #24 on: July 11, 2012, 01:00:55 AM »
I incorporated the documented standards in my recipe and refined for modern approaches. Was quick shorthand so likely missing details. And yes, the fermentation and cold pack processing are vital. Would be great if others could make it more complete.
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Offline Lacom

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Re: Bryndza
« Reply #25 on: July 11, 2012, 01:25:32 AM »


http://www.fatra.ca/product_en.htm




I'll have what he's having! No, srsly, what is that long stick thing in his other hand? The cheeses look very nice, especially the braided sheep's milk cheese. Mmmmmm.......


While on topic:

The guy is a sheep herder called "baca" (phoneticaly - batcha) and he was head of shepherd's hut called "salas". Depending on size he may have several helpers called "valach". Traditionally the owners of sheep brought their sheep to the salas in spring. In return they would get 5kg of young sheep cheese per ewe. This cheese is used to produce bryndza. For winter (it can get pretty cold in this carpathian alpine region) sheep were returned to owners and placed in stables, fed on hay.

To this day the registered bryndza making companies collect raw sheep milk twice a week from all salases to produce bryndza in industrial quantities.

In his right hand the baca guy is holding the trademark slovak instrument called "fujara" (phonetically - fuyara). Made from maple wood and ornamentaly carved it is to Slovak what didgeridoo is to the native Australian aborigines. It is played in vertical position, the mouthpiece is where the two tubes are joined. Handmade fujaras can reach decent price in souvenir shops. (don't ask how I know).  ???

In his left hand he's holding another unique type of cheese called ostiepok. It is formed in carved wooden molds and is always slowly cold smoked with the oak wood. In old times that was done by hanging cheeses in rafters above (usually) open fire pit used for cooking and heating the timber salas huts.

Cheers.