Author Topic: Munster? Tallegio? MULLEGIO!  (Read 1435 times)

Offline vertlook

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Munster? Tallegio? MULLEGIO!
« on: January 22, 2011, 12:36:05 AM »
Just wanted to share,
I was experimenting a little with washed rind chesses and the last one was a combination of recipes from 200 easy cheeses.
Basically, I followed Tallegio recipe, but added a little of Geo and  instead of brining it, just dry salted.
I had two cheeses, about half lb each. The first one was cut at around 5 weeks. It was good but somehow more like a camembert. The second one was aged two more weeks in a cave and then one week in the fridge at around 40F.
Cut it today - it is a cheese heaven!
Amazing paste, great balance of washed rind aroma.  Probably one of the best cheeses I made so far.
Attached a pic for you to droll :-)


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Offline mtncheesemaker(Pam)

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Re: Munster? Tallegio? MULLEGIO!
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2011, 07:39:38 AM »
Looks good! I love those washed-rind cheeses.

Offline John (CH)

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Re: Munster? Tallegio? MULLEGIO!
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2011, 08:50:09 AM »
That is a great looking cheese, I am drooling!

Offline Boofer

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Re: Munster? Tallegio? MULLEGIO!
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2011, 09:18:16 AM »
Excellent!  Here's my shipping address.... ;)

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Offline Brandnetel

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Re: Munster? Tallegio? MULLEGIO!
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2011, 12:59:44 PM »
Wow, looks very appetizing! And quite professional. Would pass "munster" in a nice cheese shop, I'm sure!


Also, I have to admit I have been chuckling at the use of 'blended' cheese names to describe hybrid attempts folks have made here - "mullegio", "goutaler", "goudesan" . . . . they sound funny but I guess it's one way to give people a reference point as to what is intended, eh?
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Offline Boofer

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Re: Munster? Tallegio? MULLEGIO!
« Reply #5 on: January 26, 2011, 09:14:48 AM »
Wow, looks very appetizing! And quite professional. Would pass "munster" in a nice cheese shop, I'm sure!


Also, I have to admit I have been chuckling at the use of 'blended' cheese names to describe hybrid attempts folks have made here - "mullegio", "goutaler", "goudesan" . . . . they sound funny but I guess it's one way to give people a reference point as to what is intended, eh?
Just so you don't think this was some clever hybrid concoction I came up with, please permit me to elucidate you.

From jarlsbergosten_v7:
"When we sum up all these differences between Emmental and Jarlsberg cheese, it is clearly wrong to characterize Jarlsberg cheese as a Swiss cheese type despite the fact that Swiss cheese is not a clearly defined type. This has led to occasional use of the name of “Goutaler” a new class of cheese, actually a cross between Gouda and Emmental (52). This type of cheese is now produced in several European countries, but has variable quality characteristics. Cheeses such as the Dutch “Leerdamer”, the German “Alpsberg” and “Felsberg” are grouped as “Goutaler” cheeses and are in the same group as Jarlsberg cheese. Jarlsberg cheese, however, is considered the prototype for cheeses in the “Goutaler family” (52)."

I am actually attempting to create a Goutaler style cheese. Is it a Leerdamer, Alpsberg, Felsberg or some other varietal variation? No. It does take a different culture mix and technique than either Gouda or Emmental, but it does borrow from both of those styles. I love Jarlsberg for the texture and taste. I currently have two candidates, recently done, that are aging now and should be reasonable facsimiles of a Goutaler cheese. Fingers crossed.

I guess I've steered away from calling my cheese Jarlsberg because that is a specific cheese created with that brand name and I will probably never come close to the product character. Calling it Goutaler is less specific and can cover a broader range of the style.

-Boofer-
Let's ferment something!
Bread, beer, wine, cheese...it's all good.