Author Topic: Ricotta from Swiss-style cheese whey - possible?  (Read 1162 times)

Offline berrys66

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Ricotta from Swiss-style cheese whey - possible?
« on: January 30, 2011, 12:37:08 AM »
Is it possible to make Ricotta from the whey left over from making a swiss-style cheese, or does the presence of the Shermanii interfere? Does anybody have any experience in this?


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Offline Tar

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Re: Ricotta from Swiss-style cheese whey - possible?
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2011, 11:18:50 PM »
Is there any Shermanii or anything left alive after 90+°C....?

Offline Tomer1

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Re: Ricotta from Swiss-style cheese whey - possible?
« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2011, 02:15:10 AM »
Exacly... ricota is pastuerized during the making process.
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Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Ricotta from Swiss-style cheese whey - possible?
« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2011, 08:59:14 AM »
Yes, you can definitely make Ricotta. 190-200F will kill off just about everything anyway. Thermophiles normally used during Swiss makes can be very aggressive acid producers, so you probably won't need to add as much vinegar to get the albumin proteins to coagulate.
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Offline Alpkäserei

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Re: Ricotta from Swiss-style cheese whey - possible?
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2012, 09:56:56 PM »
In the Swiss tradition, there is 1 cheese that is produced all over the country. Each region has its own cheesemaking traditions, but nearly all of them have 1 thing in common, a cheese they call Ziger. (pron. TSEE-Gār)

Ziger is produced from the whey, it is cooked to very near boiling and then a strong acid solution is added to curdle it, producing the Ziger. As the whey is scalding hot, the curd must be scooped out with a ladle and poured into a straining cloth, instead of being drawn out by hand like the first cheese generally is. It is hung in the cloth and allowed to drain, and once it has set it is taken out of the cloth and placed on a shelf above the vat where it is left for a day or two so it can be smoked. This is then eaten fresh as slices. It takes some getting used to, it has an unusual flavor.
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