Author Topic: Rennet, Type & Amount - Bitterness Impact In Aged Cheeses  (Read 1216 times)

Offline Jessica_H

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Posts: 102
  • Cheeses: 2
  • Default personal text
Rennet, Type & Amount - Bitterness Impact In Aged Cheeses
« on: February 16, 2011, 12:07:35 PM »
Hello all!

Well, after 5 weeks of travel and horse shows I finally have a weekend coming up where I can make cheese again!  I'm looking at making a provolone and Romano.  I already have 2 Parms and so I thought the Romano would be a nice change.  I also hope to make one of this type of cheese per month so I can have a steady stream in a year or so when they're ready since I do LOVE a good Parm or Romano with a nice Syrah  8)

My question is about the rennet.  In reading the boards I've gathered that vegetable rennent can leave leave a more bitter flavor over time than animal rennet?  Is that true?

I have both now...tabs of veggie rennet and liquid calf rennet.  I've only used the liquid rennet in one recipe, my camembert, where it specifically called for liquid rennet.

I'm wondering though if I shouldn't be using the liquid calf rennet in all of my longer aging cheeses?  What do you think?

Offline zenith1

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Wallkill, New York
  • Posts: 801
  • Cheeses: 25
  • "Blessed are the Cheesemakers"-Monty Python
Re: Rennet, Type & Amount - Bitterness Impact In Aged Cheeses
« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2011, 12:23:38 PM »
If you add too much of either type you can end up with that result.
Keith

Offline Sailor Con Queso

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Posts: 2,762
  • Cheeses: 134
    • Boone Creek Creamery
Re: Rennet, Type & Amount - Bitterness Impact In Aged Cheeses
« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2011, 01:13:34 PM »
Veggie rennet is more prone to bitterness, especially with long aging.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com