Author Topic: Taleggio: Meso or Thermo?  (Read 1816 times)

Offline Boofer

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Taleggio: Meso or Thermo?
« on: February 19, 2011, 01:40:52 AM »
This has probably been asked and answered already. I see recipes from Peter Dixon, Brie, Bella, and clherestian that use Thermo C culture. My 200 Easy Cheeses book calls for mesophilic. I realize there are other problems with this text and/or the author's cheesemaking, but is there any justification for using a meso culture in Taleggio?

She also doesn't add anything else into the milk, like b. linens.

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Offline MrsKK

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Re: Taleggio: Meso or Thermo?
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2011, 07:53:22 AM »
I can't answer your question, Boofer, but just wanted to comment that I'm noticing some issues with this book, too.   Based on a discussion on the forum, I decided to try a Lancashire a few weeks back and used her recipe, which doesn't seem to be very authentic.  And here I thought I had a good cheesemaking book.  Back to the drawing board, I guess.

Offline Boofer

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Re: Taleggio: Meso or Thermo?
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2011, 08:54:36 AM »
My adventure into the Goutaler world (Jarlsberg, Leerdamer, Alpsberg, Felsberg) was another point where I had a problem with her book. She doesn't grasp the difference between the Swiss/Emmental style and the Goutaler style. She models her Jarlsberg with a thermophilic culture in the same vein as Emmentaler. It should more properly be given a mesophilic treatment since it is a cross between Gouda and Emmentaler, hence the Goutaler name.

I'm inclined to follow the crowd and use thermophilic. I don't have any thermo C which apparently is the culture de rigueur. I do have ST and LH so I'll probably just use 1/16 tsp of each of those and 1/32 tsp SR3 for my 2 gallon Taleggio this weekend.

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« Last Edit: February 25, 2011, 07:58:01 AM by Boofer »
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Offline smilingcalico

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Re: Taleggio: Meso or Thermo?
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2011, 11:02:54 AM »
I can't answer your question, Boofer, but just wanted to comment that I'm noticing some issues with this book, too.   Based on a discussion on the forum, I decided to try a Lancashire a few weeks back and used her recipe, which doesn't seem to be very authentic.  And here I thought I had a good cheesemaking book.  Back to the drawing board, I guess.
Mrskk, I posted a recipe the other day for Lancashire, and a link to the old book I got it from. Just search Lancashire. Also, I'd love to hear any comments you might have about it.  Sorry for post hijacking.
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Offline Hande

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Re: Taleggio: Meso or Thermo?
« Reply #4 on: February 25, 2011, 12:54:59 AM »
Boofer, how long time for you take time that reddish color came up ?
I also use 200 easy cheese taleggio recipe and last time after 3 weeks there was not any reddish rind. I wash rind twice weekly.
Then after 3 weeks I use atomizer and spray cheeses with b.linens solution, after that the rind build up after few days.
Perhaps I use too little b.linens in milk.

Hande
« Last Edit: February 25, 2011, 02:13:13 PM by Hande »


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Offline Boofer

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Re: Taleggio: Meso or Thermo?
« Reply #5 on: February 25, 2011, 08:11:22 AM »
Boofer, how long time for you take time that reddish color came up ?
I also use 200 easy cheese taleggio recipe and last time after 3 weeks there was not any reddish rind. I wash rind twice weekly.
Then after 3 weeks I use atomizer and spray cheeses with b.liners solution, after that the rind build up after few days.
Perhaps I use too little b.liners in milk.

Hande
I guess you're asking about my second Tomme. Here's the timeline in pics: January 6th - fresh cheese, February 9th - hello, b.linens!

There's more detail on the rind development on my second Tomme thread.

Hope that helps.

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Offline Hande

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Re: Taleggio: Meso or Thermo?
« Reply #6 on: February 25, 2011, 09:41:26 AM »
Yes, you get good looking rind after 4 weeks.
I make yesterday new batch at talleggio and I put little bit more b-linens.
"Pinch" is difficult to measure,  I'm order Mini Measuring Spoon Set, but not yet  get it. 

Hande
« Last Edit: February 25, 2011, 02:12:43 PM by Hande »

Offline Boofer

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Re: Taleggio: Meso or Thermo?
« Reply #7 on: February 25, 2011, 11:06:08 AM »
The measuring spoon set that I have has three spoons. The one labeled "pinch" is .308ml (1/16tsp).

However, I have seen various mentions of how much b. linens to use in different recipes and techniques and I think sometimes a "pinch" is not really a measurement, but just a little bit here or there. Sometimes I think a "pinch" is a dose on the end of a knife point.

My guidance for cheese making comes from various recipes and opinions in the forum and most of the time I dose b. linens at 1/16 or 1/32 tsp for 4 gallons milk. In the case of my 29.5ml(1oz) spray bottle for misting, it is just a tiny bit on the tip of a knife.

I know in cooking a "pinch" is just that: what you can comfortably grasp between your thumb and index finger.

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