Author Topic: LH100 - A Major Discrepancy  (Read 1535 times)

Online Sailor Con Queso

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LH100 - A Major Discrepancy
« on: February 21, 2011, 11:23:38 PM »
I have discovered a major discrepancy (to me) in the bacterial description for LH100. Everyone is in agreement that the culture contains Lactobacillus helveticus. However, the companion bacteria is mislabeled by EVERY major supplier. From their websites...

Glengarry - Lactococcus lactis (the most incorrect)
New England Cheese Supply - Lactobacillus lactis (seemed indifferent)
Dairy Connection - Lactobacillus lactis (they have acknowledged the error)

According to the data sheet from Danisco it is actually Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis.

The difference may seem trivial, but it's not. Lb delbrueckii (and Lb casei) are referred to as "morgue bacteria" as they take over the maturation process once the lactic bacteria die off. They are important adjuncts that enhance flavor and aroma. They reduce ripening time for aged cheeses yet are beneficial for texturing all types of cheeses. Lactobacilli break down peptides that are a byproduct of protein degradation from the lactic bacteria. So they are very helpful for preventing residual bitterness. Many commercial producers use Lactobacilli adjuncts.
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Online ArnaudForestier

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Re: LH100 - A Major Discrepancy
« Reply #1 on: February 22, 2011, 06:56:42 AM »
I have discovered a major discrepancy (to me) in the bacterial description for LH100. Everyone is in agreement that the culture contains Lactobacillus helveticus. However, the companion bacteria is mislabeled by EVERY major supplier. From their websites...

Glengarry - Lactococcus lactis (the most incorrect)
New England Cheese Supply - Lactobacillus lactis (seemed indifferent)
Dairy Connection - Lactobacillus lactis (they have acknowledged the error)

According to the data sheet from Danisco it is actually Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis.

The difference may seem trivial, but it's not. Lb delbrueckii (and Lb casei) are referred to as "morgue bacteria" as they take over the maturation process once the lactic bacteria die off. They are important adjuncts that enhance flavor and aroma. They reduce ripening time for aged cheeses yet are beneficial for texturing all types of cheeses. Lactobacilli break down peptides that are a byproduct of protein degradation from the lactic bacteria. So they are very helpful for preventing residual bitterness. Many commercial producers use Lactobacilli adjuncts.

GREAT pickup, Sailor.  It's because of this that I ordered DC's feta blend, hopeful of getting some delbrueckii.  I have to change that order, now. 
« Last Edit: February 22, 2011, 07:13:46 AM by ArnaudForestier »
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Offline zenith1

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Re: LH100 - A Major Discrepancy
« Reply #2 on: February 22, 2011, 09:37:01 AM »
Sailor- I had picked up on that earlier when I was placing an order but never thought at the time to post about it. Good post, it shows your attention to details.
Keith

Offline Brie

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Re: LH100 - A Major Discrepancy
« Reply #3 on: February 22, 2011, 07:00:27 PM »
Thanks Sailor-that really does explain everything. Did you contact NE Cheesemaking to ask what their LL is? Very interesting....
Darn, another cheese meltdown--ahh, perfect fondue.

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Re: LH100 - A Major Discrepancy
« Reply #4 on: February 23, 2011, 08:41:25 AM »
LH100 is supplied by Danisco and is the same for everyone. The LL at New England is labeled wrong for the LH100. In other cultures the LL can mean LactoCOCCUS lactis which is a primary lactic bacteria. Winsconsin even calls it the state bacteria.
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Offline DeejayDebi

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Re: LH100 - A Major Discrepancy
« Reply #5 on: February 23, 2011, 11:32:47 AM »
Sometime around like 1989  think they started re-naming the bacteria cultures for some reason which I don't pretend to understand. I think this may have lead to some confusion with some of the distribtors. Some use the old and some use the new. I had a list somewhere of both names I will try to find it.

arkc

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Re: LH100 - A Major Discrepancy
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2011, 12:54:50 PM »
No one ever posted the old and new names, so I am posting a link that should be helpful.

http://www.dairyforall.com/starterculture.php

annie

ANDREARK

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Re: LH100 - A Major Discrepancy
« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2011, 09:31:26 AM »
This link didn't work.

chasemom

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Re: LH100 - A Major Discrepancy
« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2011, 02:45:18 PM »
This link didn't work.

chasemom
Works for me. Perhaps your computer doesn't understand ".php" files?

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Re: LH100 - A Major Discrepancy
« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2011, 03:10:54 PM »
Tried it again, , , it worked.

chasermom


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