Author Topic: Cheese trier  (Read 2276 times)

Offline Hande

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Cheese trier
« on: March 09, 2011, 04:04:31 PM »
Hello,
I get my new toy  'Cheese Trier'  at Cheesemakers.
My newbie guestion is:  how I use it ?
For example: I take sample out of my cheese, taste a pit, and put that piece back and that seal cheese.
Should I put some wax for that 'cut' to heal it ?

Hande


« Last Edit: March 09, 2011, 04:31:26 PM by Hande »


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Offline ArnaudForestier

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Re: Cheese trier
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2011, 04:36:44 PM »
Funny you post this, Hande, as I was just an hour or so ago thinking on this.  I came across this site, which describes sampling techniques (warning, PDF).  For the trier, they recommend resealing with:

Quote
Sealing compounds.—(1) Mix by heating paraffin, bees wax,
and white petrolatum (1 + 1 + 2, w/w/w); or (2) mix by heating white
petrolatum and paraffin (1 + 1, w/w)


I have also seen recommendations to just "smear" some of the cheese rind back in place. 

Sorry, also, not to hijack your thread, but as I'm going to have to wait on a bonafide trier, I've been thinking on cheap alternatives...kind of crazy, but from Rick Robinson's (of NECS) cheesemaking forum, a contributor:

Quote
I’ve discovered a great cheese trier.  It’s a key used by hair dressers to squeeze color from the tube.  My hair dresser gave me one, but I understand they are only a couple of dollars at a beauty supply house.  I tried it today and it works great.


Have no idea how well it works.  "Couple of dollars" sounds compelling. 

Oh, and Hande - I'm disappointed, by the way; I half-expected to see a trier made out of a spoon, or something equally ingenious. ;D

- Paul

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Cheese trier
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2011, 05:18:53 PM »
Apple corer is a cheap alternative.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Offline ArnaudForestier

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Re: Cheese trier
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2011, 05:53:45 PM »
Sailor, believe it or not, I have sought an apple corer over the last 2 days.  Hysterical that every place I went to had everything but the old-fashioned kind.  The "key" I got is equally hysterical - like a stainless steel, little 3" version of a true trier.  About 1/4" bore by 3".  Not good enough to do a good sample to the middle, unless attacking from many sides, but $1.89, so, well, you know. ;D
- Paul

Offline ArnaudForestier

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Re: Cheese trier
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2011, 07:13:58 PM »
Note to self.  And any anyone close to a beauty supply store.

Get the apple corer.  Or a real trier.   Do not try to use a dinky little "hair color tube turner" for a mini-trier attempt. ::)

On the good side, my first pressed cheese ("tomme no. 1") attempt is, by my family's palate, really good, at 5 weeks in, and I'm pleased; I thought this one was going to be a truly nasty wheel of dehydrated milk.  This is Pav's recipe, and his extraordinarily generous guidance, so many thanks go to him.

On the bad side, I have to learn lath plastering, in addition to cheesemaking, and that, pronto.  ;D
« Last Edit: March 09, 2011, 08:40:59 PM by ArnaudForestier »
- Paul


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