Author Topic: Juustoa (Juustoleipä) #1  (Read 234 times)

Offline John@PC

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Hartsville, SC
  • Posts: 504
  • Cheeses: 39
  • Default personal text
    • Perfect Cheese
Juustoa (Juustoleipä) #1
« on: October 06, 2014, 10:42:50 AM »
Thanks to Glenn for the inspiration but I didn't want to clutter his thread and I wanted to add some additional detail.  I followed his recipe pretty closely up to the draining part and broiling:

- after letting curds sit 30 min drained off whey
- whey continued to collect in making pan so I drained off whey every 10 min. or so for 20 min.
- transferred curds to two pie pans
- let pans sit and drained whey as needed for another 30 min.
- placed one pan into broiler @ 500F (decided to do one at a time to see how it worked; good idea)
- removed pan when browning started and more whey started to collect
- put other pan into broiler and drained whey from the one I removed, then flipped the cheese like Glenn advises
- kept alternating pans, draining and flipping until both cheeses were nicely browned and whey elimination was minimal

The alternating broiling and draining one pan at a time took longer (maybe 30 min. total) but seemed to work well.  At the end there was very little whey draining but cheese was still very moist.  We served it with peach preserves and jalapeno pepper jelly which were both good.

I will add a bit of info I found on this cheese (a cheese-iography, if you will):  Both my new "Science of Making Cheese" and "World Encyclopedia of Cheese" spells it Juustoleipä which translates to "cheese bread".  They also say reindeer milk is often used (apparently it takes two to milk a reindeer :o) and classic way of "broiling" is to toast in front of an open fire.


« Last Edit: October 06, 2014, 11:01:51 AM by John@PC »


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline GlennK

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: Northern Michigan
  • Posts: 109
  • Cheeses: 7
  • New to cheesemaking
Re: Juustoa (Juustoleipä) #1
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2014, 07:21:06 PM »
Well done John!  You make a Finlander proud. ;D 

What kind of milk did you use?  Store bought?  Raw?

I usually use raw milk which usually makes a firmer curd and therefore a "taller" cheese.  When I use store bought milk I usually add calcium chloride to firm up the curd.  Did I mention that in the recipe? I don't remember.
Juustoa is my main cheese!

Offline John@PC

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Hartsville, SC
  • Posts: 504
  • Cheeses: 39
  • Default personal text
    • Perfect Cheese
Re: Juustoa (Juustoleipä) #1
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2014, 07:10:35 AM »
Thanks Glenn, and no I forgot to mention the milk.  We have a produce stand close by where I can get low-temp. pasteurized / non-homogenized cows milk from Hickory Hill Farms in Edgefield SC for less than $5 a gal.  I've tried raw milk ($2 more a gal.) a couple of times but love the quality of curd I get from the HH milk.  Still use CaCl just in case.

Offline Anonymous

  • Sailing The Seas of Cheese
  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Canada
  • Posts: 702
  • Cheeses: 52
  • Default personal text
Re: Juustoa (Juustoleipä) #1
« Reply #3 on: October 08, 2014, 06:21:54 PM »
Nice cheese John! I love this cheese! I've been meaning to experiment a little with it like adding fruit or switch to brown sugar or something. You know, trying to add to the sweetness.

A cheese for you John. Looks awesome!

Offline John@PC

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Hartsville, SC
  • Posts: 504
  • Cheeses: 39
  • Default personal text
    • Perfect Cheese
Re: Juustoa (Juustoleipä) #1
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2014, 06:36:07 PM »
I like the idea of using brown vs. white sugar!  It's wonderful using Glenn's recipe but looks like also a very good base for experimentation.   Then again if you follow tradition you need to find a reindeer to milk and build a fire in you backyard to toast the cheese  :).  Wonder if you could use the milk of a Whitetail ????


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.