Author Topic: Best skim milk cheeses  (Read 74 times)

Offline billmac

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Best skim milk cheeses
« on: Yesterday at 12:34:49 PM »
So my first attempt at using the cream separator and making butter (goat's milk) was a success.  The next question is, what to do with the skim milk, besides just drink it, which we do.

What cheeses and/or other milk products lend themselves best to skim milk?

Thanks

Offline Raw Prawn

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Re: Best skim milk cheeses
« Reply #1 on: Yesterday at 06:54:30 PM »
The following link will give you the general answer to your question:
http://www.cheesemaking.com/learn/faq/milk.html
Many cheeses are and were traditionally, made with skim milk or with partially skimmed milk. I have not used skim milk much except  for Romano.
One of my favourites is Double Gloucester which is made with full cream milk and, although I have not made it , I am aware that there is a skim milk version: Single Gloucester.
I have no doubt that you will get plenty of other suggestions from other contributors to the forum.
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Offline Al Lewis

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Re: Best skim milk cheeses
« Reply #2 on: Today at 09:50:41 AM »
Check into emmentaler if you have skimmed cows milk.  Also Mutschli.
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Offline Stinky

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Re: Best skim milk cheeses
« Reply #3 on: Today at 06:53:46 PM »
Check into emmentaler if you have skimmed cows milk.  Also Mutschli.

For these it's best to add some whole milk to get the right fat content- if i remember correctly, Al figured 3-1 2% to whole was correct. If you do the math you should be able to figure out the right ratio.

To expand on this, these cheeses were traditionally made in the Alps, and they wanted to skim cream and butter as well. So what they did was the following-- leave the pans of evening milk out overnight, next morning skim the cream off, add the morning milk, and make cheese from the combination. This is another characteristic that contributes to the eye formation, as the texture and consistency are better for getting large eyes with less fat.
It's probably a pathogen.