Author Topic: Yogourmet yogurt starter with 3 probiotics  (Read 302 times)

Offline john H

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Yogourmet yogurt starter with 3 probiotics
« on: November 13, 2016, 09:01:01 AM »
 I purchased the Yogurt starter 3 Probiotics. On the website it is stated

 " For best results, use with Yogourmet Multi yogurt maker because this starter requires a gradual increase of temperature from 25°C/77°F to 44°C/110°F."

I do not have a Yogourmet Multi yogurt maker but I am able to precisely control the temperature.

Does anyone have instructions \ directions stating the temperature time and rate of increase.

John



Offline awakephd

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Re: Yogourmet yogurt starter with 3 probiotics
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2016, 06:23:15 PM »
Hmm ... does the package give any indication of what types of bacteria are included in the starter?
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Offline john H

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Re: Yogourmet yogurt starter with 3 probiotics
« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2016, 06:33:50 PM »
Hi awakephd here is the info on the package.

"This yogurt starter allows you to make homemade probiotic yogurt, it contains 2 additional probiotic strains; Lactobacillus casei and Bifidobacterium ("Bifidus") longum. Do good to your health with 100 billion live and active bacteria per 100 g serving! Once made, homemade yogurt keeps for 2 to 3 weeks in the refrigerator."

John

Offline john H

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Re: Yogourmet yogurt starter with 3 probiotics
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2016, 04:10:22 PM »
Here is the reply from Yogourmet.

"Since you do not own a Yogourmet Multi electric yogur maker, you will have to incubate yogurt, made with the Yogourmet CBA freeze-dried yogurt starter with probiotics, at a constant temperature of 37°C/98.6°F for 14-16 hours. 

Best regards."

Offline awakephd

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Re: Yogourmet yogurt starter with 3 probiotics
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2016, 11:02:13 AM »
Their reply suggests that you can get good results using a constant temperature - which is what I would have suspected. The only thing that I can think of that a gradual rise in temperature would allow is to let some bacterial strains get a stronger foothold before the more dominant strains kick in.
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Offline john H

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Re: Yogourmet yogurt starter with 3 probiotics
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2016, 04:23:07 PM »
That is what I suspected as well. I am toying with the idea of the graduates temperature increase. The instructions say 25c to 44c over 9 to 15 hours, so I was thinking of starting at 25 and increasing the temperature 2c per hour over 10 hours or something like that. What do you think?

John

Offline awakephd

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Re: Yogourmet yogurt starter with 3 probiotics
« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2016, 09:17:06 AM »
John, first off, a caveat - though I have made and continue to make yogurt many times, I am no expert, so take my thoughts with a grain of salt!

I did a little digging into the two bacteria you found on the label. "Bifobacterium" apparently covers a whole range of species. But I didn't see whether they were mesophilic or thermophilic or something else. They are active in the human gut, so presumably they thrive at 37°. The L. casei is apparently one of the primary non-ripening LBA -- i.e., bacteria naturally found in milk that add flavor, but don't lower the pH significantly -- and I'm inclined to think it is probably a mesophilic, though Wikipedia says it tolerates a wide range of temperature and pH.

As we discussed, my assumption is that the ramp-up from lower temperature will encourage / allow mesophilic bacteria to develop before they begin to deactivate and perhaps to die at the upper temperatures. (As I recall, most meso bacteria die somewhere in the range of 41-44° - so the upper end of your  temperature range might or might not kill them off, but at the very least should keep them relatively inactive.) But they will stay active all the way up to at least 37-38°.

So your proposed temperature profile will keep the milk at low and meso temperatures for 6-8 hours. Since the casei doesn't ripen the milk, and I'm presuming the bifidus doesn't either, presumably this just lets a whole lot of them develop for probiotic properties; then the thermophilic strains begin to kick in and ripen the milk, eventually leading to its coagulation into yogurt. I don't recall when thermo bacteria begin to become active; I'm guessing it's around 30°. If that is correct, then the thermos will start working after about 3 hours into your temperature profile, and gradually will become dominant after maybe around 8 hours.

Please note that there is a lot of guesswork and assumption in my "analysis" above, so again, take it for what it is worth. But if I'm vaguely correct in my guesses and assumptions, I would think the profile you suggest would make sense. The only quibble of concern I would have would be whether the time at low/meso temps could allow any unwanted contaminants to get a foothold - so use good sanitation, as always, along with a lid.

One other thought - are you going to heat the milk to 82-83° first? Not only would this help to eliminate any unwanted bacteria in the milk, but it also helps to denature some of the proteins that otherwise stay in the whey. This will give a thicker, richer final product. I heat my milk to 82-83° (180° for us Fahrenheit types) and hold it there for 30 minutes, stirring throughout; then I cool it rapidly in a sink of cold water down to the target temp - which for the yogurt I make is 46° (115°F). Since I've been doing this, it has made a really significant difference in the thickness/texture of the yogurt. Using whole milk and/or adding some additional cream sends it over the top into gastronomic delights. :)

Of course, the most important thing of all - try it, and give us the report!
-- Andy

Offline john H

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Re: Yogourmet yogurt starter with 3 probiotics
« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2016, 02:36:08 PM »
Thanks for your thoughts Andy. Yes I plan on heating to 180 before starting. Do you add Calcium chloride to the milk?

John

Offline awakephd

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Re: Yogourmet yogurt starter with 3 probiotics
« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2016, 10:08:18 AM »
I have never tried adding CaCl when making yogurt - never thought of it. I'll be interested to hear if others have tried it ...
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Offline john H

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Re: Yogourmet yogurt starter with 3 probiotics
« Reply #9 on: November 19, 2016, 11:55:46 AM »
One other thought - are you going to heat the milk to 82-83° first? Not only would this help to eliminate any unwanted bacteria in the milk, but it also helps to denature some of the proteins that otherwise stay in the whey. This will give a thicker, richer final product. I heat my milk to 82-83° (180° for us Fahrenheit types) and hold it there for 30 minutes, stirring throughout; then I cool it rapidly in a sink of cold water down to the target temp - which for the yogurt I make is 46° (115°F). Since I've been doing this, it has made a really significant difference in the thickness/texture of the yogurt. Using whole milk and/or adding some additional cream sends it over the top into gastronomic delights. :)

Of course, the most important thing of all - try it, and give us the report!

Do you hang in cheese cloth to drain as well?

I was thinking 2 things here 1) a bulk process of 4L and then hanging in cheese cloth to drain. 2) process in individual containers.

Any thoughts.

John

P.S. thanks for sharing all the great info.   

John
« Last Edit: November 19, 2016, 12:10:08 PM by john H »

Offline awakephd

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Re: Yogourmet yogurt starter with 3 probiotics
« Reply #10 on: November 19, 2016, 02:59:43 PM »
I sometimes use the yogurt as-is, and sometimes strain it; sometimes a bit of both! I like it both ways.

One really, really important matter, at least in my experience - do NOT try to stir or otherwise disturb the yogurt after it finishes making; refrigerate it immediately, with as little disturbance as possible. I woudn't even strain it until it has chilled. Once it is cold, you can use it as you wish. 
-- Andy

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Re: Yogourmet yogurt starter with 3 probiotics
« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2016, 10:19:10 AM »
Ok here is how this went down last night. I used 4L homo 3.25% fat and 500ml 5% cream that was kicking around in the fridge. Heated the milk to 180f held for 30 min, then rapid cooled to 86f 30c. I used my oven on proof mode for the incubation. All in all I am very happy with the finished yogurt. The reason for the drop of in time at the end of the incubation time is due to us liking yogurt more sweet than tart and thought about it half way through the make so I shortened the time just a little.

1) held at 85f 29c for 2.5 hours

2) held at 90f 32c for 2.5 hours

3) held at 95f 35c for 2.5 hours

4) held at 100f 38c for 2 hours

5) held at 105f 40c for 2 hours

6) held at 110f 43c for 1 hours

When coming out of the oven the yogurt was set already but did not disturb and right into the fridge.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2016, 10:36:23 AM by john H »

Offline awakephd

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Re: Yogourmet yogurt starter with 3 probiotics
« Reply #12 on: November 21, 2016, 09:24:07 AM »
Looks good! AC4U.
-- Andy