Author Topic: Dunlop Cheese Making Recipe  (Read 2564 times)

Offline pliezar (Ian)

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Dunlop Cheese Making Recipe
« on: March 17, 2011, 03:16:42 PM »
This may sound weird, but I would like to explore my heritage by making some cheeses that my grandparents would have eaten in their respective countries of origin.  Being a first generation Canadian and at bit of a history buff this interests me on many levels.

I have the french side with a tomme, the Austrian Side with any mountain cheese (going with an Appenzeller) 

I asked my Grandmother about a cheese she ate when she lived in Scottland and she said she loved Dunlop.  I have made Cheddar before, but I would like to make her some Dunlop as a gift (will try it first on myself)

I know that milk has a lot to do with flavour, but I am having problems finding a recipe on how to make it, any suggestions?

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Dunlop Cheese Making Recipe
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2011, 12:40:31 AM »
Hi,

Here's what I've found when doing research online for Dunlop.  The text is from a book now out of copywrite.  Anyway, it's not quite a recipe, and I don't have the experience to convert it, but it might be useful to those who can.

- Jeff
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Offline cottagecheese

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Re: Dunlop Cheese Making Recipe
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2011, 05:06:02 AM »
Right then, here it is:

(and just to be on the safe side) From Katie Thear's book Cheesemaking and Dairying

This is a flat, round cheese from Scotland, and is rather like a quick-ripening Cheddar.  It was traditionally used as a toasting cheese.

5 litres milk
2.5ml liquid starter or a little DVI
1.2ml rennet

For larger quantities 1% starter
12ml rennet per 50 litres of milk

Pasteurise the milk then cool to 30 degrees C.  Add the starter, stir well, then cover and leave in a warm place for an hour.
Stir in the previously diluted rennet, cover and leave until the milk has set.  This is normally 45-60 minutes.

Cut the curd into broad bean size cubes and stir to loosen the curds and release the whey.  Gradually raise the temperature to 36 degrees C over a period of 20 minutes, stirring gently by hand, then leave to settle for a further 20 minutes.

Remove the whey and cut the consolidated curd mass into several, broad slabs.  Pile one on top of the other, then change the order several times over the next 30 minutes.  After this, mill or cut the curds into small pieces and sprinkle with salt.  Put in a cloth-lined mould and press lightly for 15 minutes, then increase the pressure and leave for 3 hours.  Turn the cheese the other way round and press overnight.

The following day remove the cheese from the press and dip it in water at 66 degrees C for 1 minute.  Put it back in a cloth lined mould and press for another day.  Finally take the cheese out of the press, leave it to dry then bandage or wax it for storage.  Leave to ripen in storage at 10-15 degrees C and 85% humidity, turning it every now and again.  It is ready after 6-8 weeks, but will continue to mature the longer it is left.

I used 2% salt for the weight of curd and I wrapped in muslin secured with flour and water paste.

I later removed the bandages, cleaned off the mould, cut it into quarters and waxed each one separately so that I could taste it at different stages.

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Dunlop Cheese Making Recipe
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2011, 06:50:30 PM »
Thanks a lot! 

- Jeff
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Offline pliezar (Ian)

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Re: Dunlop Cheese Making Recipe
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2011, 07:33:05 PM »
Yes thank you very much

Offline stoneyridge

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Re: Dunlop Cheese Making Recipe
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2011, 10:12:45 AM »

I have the french side with a tomme, the Austrian Side with any mountain cheese (going with an Appenzeller) 


I know that milk has a lot to do with flavour, but I am having problems finding a recipe on how to make it, any suggestions?

Ian - would you mind sharing what you used (or plan on using) for the brine on the Appenzeller?  I'm trying to come up with a good combination to use, and would love suggestions.  Thanks!

D

Offline pliezar (Ian)

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Re: Dunlop Cheese Making Recipe
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2011, 10:54:16 AM »
Hi,

No problem, I am getting side tracked by other projects and work.  I still have not had the time to make the Dunlop.  But I will definitely share the Appenzeller brine when I get around to making it. I hope to make something soon.

Cheers

Offline suziedd

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Re: Dunlop Cheese Making Recipe
« Reply #7 on: August 12, 2013, 02:49:42 AM »
Thank you so much,cottagecheese,for posting the Dunlop instructions.I have enjoyed making this cheese today and look forward to a good,meaning edible,end result.

Offline JeffHamm

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Re: Dunlop Cheese Making Recipe
« Reply #8 on: August 12, 2013, 02:05:20 PM »
Hi suziedd,

I've made this a couple times since it was originally posted and it's a nice cheese.  In fact, I think I've got one over a year old in my cave now!  Please do start a thread on your make and update us when you taste it. 

- Jeff
The wise do not always start out on the right path, but they do know when to change course.