Author Topic: Coagulation, Rennet - Flocculation Time Method, Reducing Rennet Amount & Consequences Of Excess Renn  (Read 1125 times)

Offline darius

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: SW Virginia, USA
  • Posts: 315
  • Cheeses: 8
    • Gardening Along the Creek
I keep cutting down the amount of rennet, and still get floc at less than 10 minutes, even with ~1/8 tab. in 1 gallon.

I'm using Marschall M-50 from Leeners, although will have some liquid calf rennet next month.

TIA


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline FRANCOIS

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Posts: 788
  • Cheeses: 71
  • Default personal text
Can you tell us what temp and pH you are setting at?

Also, is it your own raw milk or store bought?

Offline darius

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: SW Virginia, USA
  • Posts: 315
  • Cheeses: 8
    • Gardening Along the Creek
88ºF for one make, 93ºF for another. I don't have a pH meter yet but some pH strips on order.

Thanks

Offline Marta

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: Southeast Michigan
  • Posts: 52
  • Cheeses: 4
  • Gouda ya do!
I have the same problem; M-50 floccing at 6 or 7 minutes.  Store bought milk; no pH meter yet.  88 degrees for most recent one (I forget the other). 

Offline Sailor Con Queso

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Posts: 2,497
  • Cheeses: 123
    • Boone Creek Creamery
Just keep reducing your rennet until your floc point is 12-15 minutes. Short floc times can contribute to bitter peptides.

IMHO the pH strips are difficult to read and not accurate enough to use for making cheese.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Helen

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: SoCal
  • Posts: 188
  • Cheeses: 4
  • To choose is to forsake.
Darius,

I believe that one tab of Marshall M-50 is supposed to be enough to set 50 liters of milk, which is approximately 12 gallons.

Since I am out of liquid rennet, I have been using those tabs. I use a 1/6th - 1/8th of tab to set 2 gallons and get consistent floc time of 12mn. I believe that 1/8th for 1gallon is too much. For 1gallon, I would put half of what you currently use.

Helen 

Offline darius

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: SW Virginia, USA
  • Posts: 315
  • Cheeses: 8
    • Gardening Along the Creek
Sailor, I know the limitations of pH papers, but that's all I can afford for now, and they are far better than just guessing! Thanks for the info of what short floc times do...

Helen, Thanks. I did not know that about the Marshall M-50 tabs. I'll try cutting it down even more, until I can replace them with liquid calf rennet.

Offline zenith1

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Wallkill, New York
  • Posts: 801
  • Cheeses: 25
  • "Blessed are the Cheesemakers"-Monty Python
Darius-in my experience the liquid rennet is a better solution-it's easier to be precise with your quantities, and a lot of people feel it contributes to a better cheese. Of course a persons personal life choices(vegan for instance) could dictate the type of rennet that you use. Keep working on your make by cutting back on the tab until you get the flocc time that you are looking for. Cheers!
Keith

Offline Helen

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: SoCal
  • Posts: 188
  • Cheeses: 4
  • To choose is to forsake.
Darius,

On the packaging, it is written: Marschall m-50 Cuaja 50 litros. You may want to double check if it is also written on yours.





Offline Marta

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: Southeast Michigan
  • Posts: 52
  • Cheeses: 4
  • Gouda ya do!
Heh; my recipe called for 1 & 1/2 tablets for 4 gallons.  I wonder what kind of tablets they meant.   ???


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline Helen

  • Mature Cheese
  • ****
  • Location: SoCal
  • Posts: 188
  • Cheeses: 4
  • To choose is to forsake.
Marta,

In my (very) limited experience, no matter what a recipe tells you, you have to adjust the quantities to reflect the ingredients you are using. Of course, in terms of cultures, it also depends on the type of cheese you are making.
 

Offline Marta

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: Southeast Michigan
  • Posts: 52
  • Cheeses: 4
  • Gouda ya do!
Sailor -- is "bitter peptides" a flavor problem or a food safety problem? 

Offline Sailor Con Queso

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Posts: 2,497
  • Cheeses: 123
    • Boone Creek Creamery
Bitter peptides can be produced during proteolysis (the breakdown of proteins). It is not a food safety issue, but can result in bitter or "off" flavors.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com

Offline Marta

  • Medium Cheese
  • ***
  • Location: Southeast Michigan
  • Posts: 52
  • Cheeses: 4
  • Gouda ya do!
Thanks; I guess I'll plod forward with the aging, anyway... if it's bitter I'm sure I'll find that out in three months  :(

Offline Sailor Con Queso

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Kentucky
  • Posts: 2,497
  • Cheeses: 123
    • Boone Creek Creamery
If it's bitter, just put it back and age another month or two.
A moldy Stilton is a thing of beauty. Yes, you eat the rind. - Ed
www.boonecreekcreamery.com