Author Topic: Multiple Culture Cheese Experiement  (Read 709 times)

Offline dthelmers

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Multiple Culture Cheese Experiement
« on: March 23, 2011, 02:40:27 PM »
I was intrigued by the fresh curd recipe made by Linuxboy, at
<http://wacheese.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=80:fresh-cheddar-curd-extended-shelf-life&catid=43:moderate-cook-temp&Itemid=66>
The culture I had on hand were MM100 for the mesophilic and Abiasa Thermo type C. Other than that, I followed the instructions for the make, hit my pH target at just 3 hours, floc time was right on at 10 minutes, hit the temps just right. I followed the steps right up to cheddaring, where I departed: I pressed the curd cake with my hands as if starting to cheddar, but simply pressed the whole thing without cheddaring (my wife needed me for other chores). I lighlty, flipped, pressed a little harder while I took my wife out, flipped when we got home and pressed with full weight overnight. Next day I brined the cheese (from four gallons of milk, 3.4 lbs.) ofr 12 hours, flipping at six hours.
Let this dry on the rack in the kitchen until last night, when we shaved off a sliver to taste it, as it smelled so good. A pound of slivers later, we decided to save some for the weekend.
The flavor is rich and buttery, a fantastic snacking cheese that we will make regularly.
Since this cheese is ripe so fast from the pre-ripening of the milk with diacetylactus, what should I expect if I try aging it?
Dave in CT


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Offline linuxboy

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Re: Multiple Culture Cheese Experiement
« Reply #1 on: March 23, 2011, 03:33:50 PM »
Quote
what should I expect if I try aging it?
The closest cousin commercially is parrano or zola, or similar engineered cheeses developed in the last 10-15 years. Depends on your moisture target and milk PF and affinage.

I make a 15% washed uncooked curd, skimmed raw milk goat tomme with that culture mix (actually half FD, half MM), and it makes a really fantastic cheese - great flavor even when young, sort of like a cross between garrotxa and pecorino (my goat milk is from mini-crosses, more like sheep milk than goat).

Glad you liked the make :). My goal is to make the science accessible so normal people can make great cheese at home and support local dairies.
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline dthelmers

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Re: Multiple Culture Cheese Experiement
« Reply #2 on: March 24, 2011, 08:09:04 AM »
Glad you liked the make :). My goal is to make the science accessible so normal people can make great cheese at home and support local dairies.

You've done a great job making the science accessible. I've not had much education, but I can follow your explanations (most of the time) of what is actually happening with the cheese. Thank you for all the hours you put in doing this, I really appreciate it. You've taken years off my learning curve.
I really enjoy the taste that pre-ripening with the diacetylactis provides. I'm going to experiment with this for the next few weeks and see the difference it makes in other cheeses I make regularly, like butterkaese and Gouda.
Dave in CT
Dave in CT

Offline bbracken677

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Re: Multiple Culture Cheese Experiement
« Reply #3 on: September 14, 2012, 06:42:31 PM »
I was perusing old posts in the cheddared section and ran across this. This sounds awesome!  In effect, a cheddar that requires little to no aging!!

I am definitely going to try this next week!  I have a couple of makes scheduled for next week...this will be one, for sure!

Thanks guys! Thanks Pav for the interesting cheddar curds page!