Author Topic: Coagulation, Rennet, Goat, Raw - Coagulum Sank To Bottom Of Vat  (Read 566 times)

Offline felipearamburu

  • New Cheese
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Cheeses: 0
  • Default personal text


So I am using Raw Goat's Milk to make my first Goats milk cheese. I have been making cheese from raw cows milk for 4 months and have made 15 cheeses so far and have never come across something like this.

I put my mesophiliic starter in the milk and let it ripen. I had the milke ripening ata temp that was slightly to high, about 98 instead of 93 but not a huge concern I am assuming. I let it ripen a bit longer than normal, for 1.5 hours as opposed to 1. This isn't normal for me but I was in a semi-social situation that surprised me.

So then I go ahead and add the renet, the temp has fallen down a little to about 95. I let it ripen for 40 minutes and come back to check it out and I see whey, with some cloudly milk particles on top but abreak through that shows me lots of whey, i reach in and the curds are all the way at the bottom, coagulated with whey draining from this large mass. I ended up cutting this small grainy semi ricotta looking mess into 1/2 inch chunks and im about to press it and see what comes out but does anyone have any idea how and why this happened?







Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline smilingcalico

  • A picture is worth a thousand words; but a cheese should leave you speechless.
  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Northern California
  • Posts: 674
  • Cheeses: 26
    • Artisan Cheesemaker
Re: Coagulation, Rennet, Goat, Raw - Coagulum Sank To Bottom Of Vat
« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2011, 01:32:04 AM »
I'm curious too. I had that happen once, but was a lactic acid cheese with very little rennet, and temp was 84° at time of adding culture and rennet. The temp was 77° when I went back to it 24 hours later to ladle it.  Someone suggested maybe I hadn't stopped the milk from spinning, but they weren't positive. Your curd description is exactly as mine had been.
www.brianackerly.com
Website of an Artisan Cheesemaker.

Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,977
  • Cheeses: 197
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Re: Coagulation, Rennet, Goat, Raw - Coagulum Sank To Bottom Of Vat
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2011, 10:32:49 AM »
Gradient existed in the milk. Either uneven acid distribution, too-rapid acidification in layers due to uneven bacterial distribution, uneven rennet concentration, or temp was different in some parts of the milk.
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.

Offline smilingcalico

  • A picture is worth a thousand words; but a cheese should leave you speechless.
  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Northern California
  • Posts: 674
  • Cheeses: 26
    • Artisan Cheesemaker
Re: Coagulation, Rennet, Goat, Raw - Coagulum Sank To Bottom Of Vat
« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2011, 02:24:19 PM »
Thanks LB.  Could you tell me what the consequence would be of not stopping the milk from spinning? I was fairly certain that wasn't the issue, but was told not to question that persons judgment.
www.brianackerly.com
Website of an Artisan Cheesemaker.

Offline linuxboy

  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Ukiah, CA
  • Posts: 3,977
  • Cheeses: 197
  • www.wacheese.com
    • Washington Cheese Guild
Re: Coagulation, Rennet, Goat, Raw - Coagulum Sank To Bottom Of Vat
« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2011, 06:42:43 PM »
curd shattering. Rarely seen unless you really keep stirring the milk for 3-5 mins after adding rennet.
Taking an extended leave (until 2015) from the forums to build out my farm and dairy. Please e-mail or PM if you need anything.


Guests, join the CheeseForum.org community to remove this ad.


Offline smilingcalico

  • A picture is worth a thousand words; but a cheese should leave you speechless.
  • Old Cheese
  • *****
  • Location: Northern California
  • Posts: 674
  • Cheeses: 26
    • Artisan Cheesemaker
Re: Coagulation, Rennet, Goat, Raw - Coagulum Sank To Bottom Of Vat
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2011, 07:26:06 PM »
Would curd shattering have a similar appearance as the above described condition?  Not to mention, the rennet amount was minuscule.
www.brianackerly.com
Website of an Artisan Cheesemaker.

Offline felipearamburu

  • New Cheese
  • *
  • Posts: 3
  • Cheeses: 0
  • Default personal text
Re: Coagulation, Rennet, Goat, Raw - Coagulum Sank To Bottom Of Vat
« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2011, 09:21:09 PM »
Gradient existed in the milk. Either uneven acid distribution, too-rapid acidification in layers due to uneven bacterial distribution, uneven rennet concentration, or temp was different in some parts of the milk.


Ok So this and the spinning things are important to consider for me I think.

Sometimes I move the pot a little while I am renetting and while its culturing, could this have an adverse effect ive there is some movement during this time (it is not violent movement but normally i flow warm water into the place where I put my pot into and last night I was somewhere without my tubing to accomplish this so i had to lift the pot and remove the plug and refill with warmer water to maintain temp). Could this be the cause?

As for culture, I used a direct set culture and slowly let it fall into the pot by tapping the foil wrapper, while stirring gently but thoroughly. I did the same for the rennet but may not have stirred it as long. I don't think there was a significant temp difference since the pot was fully submerged in warm water.

I hop the curds are still usable, I am going to try and make it into something like feta anyway.