Author Topic: Aging - Impact Of Lower Temperature On Different Cheese Types  (Read 545 times)

Offline steffb503

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In the CheeseMakers' Manuel they say that normal aging temp is 50-55 but aging lower, around 40 gives the best results. You only need to age for longer.
So Can I age my raw hard cheeses around 45? If so how much longer do I need to age to achieve the best results?
I am making Emmenthal and Edam at the moment.


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Offline zenith1

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Re: Aging - Impact Of Lower Temperature On Different Cheese Types
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2012, 07:28:01 AM »
Steff-you can definitely age at 45F. And you are correct it will take longer to age to the same point. I think that point will Have to be determined by you. A lot is going to have to do with YOUR recipe for each variety that you make. By that I mean the actual step by step process that you used in crafting your cheese. How much starters, rennet, cooking temperatures, how you are aging the wheel(natural rind/waxed/vacuum bagged) etc. I am sure that someone else would be able to give you an approximation of the extra time needed based on the difference in times that you have quoted. I think that in the end you are going to have to experiment a little with the length of time for YOUR cheese.
Keith

Offline Sailor Con Queso

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Re: Aging - Impact Of Lower Temperature On Different Cheese Types
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2012, 08:00:32 AM »
Why do you want to age at 45? They will take MUCH longer to mature.
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Offline steffb503

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Re: Aging - Impact Of Lower Temperature On Different Cheese Types
« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2012, 05:25:10 AM »
What do you mean by MUCH? Got a ball park time frame.

My space is limited. If I can have one large fridge set at 45 I can then age the vac sealed hard cheeses and the wrapped Cams all in the same place.

Offline FRANCOIS

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Re: Aging - Impact Of Lower Temperature On Different Cheese Types
« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2012, 06:06:35 AM »
Here is a real world example:

Traditional camembert kept at 55F, after bloom I can hold it at this temp for 3 weeks before it is totally ripe.  If I wrap it at 10 days and put it at 40F it will go 6 weeks total.

For hard cheeses this is the way all of the commercially made hard cheeses are done.  Blocks, usually 20kg, are vacuum sealed after manufacture and stacked on pallets in chillers at 40F.  Maturation varies by cheese type of course but mild cheddars are kept up to 3 months, regular to 6, sharp is out at 9 and aged is 12 plus.  All of these times are at this low temp.  It helps to supress any bugs and contamination that may be present plus a lot of the flavour adjunct cultures are designed to grow at these temps.


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Offline george13

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Re: Aging - Impact Of Lower Temperature On Different Cheese Types
« Reply #5 on: March 10, 2012, 06:29:13 AM »
Hi Steff,

I think you should check with the NYS folks on your aging refrigerator temps, because I believe they are instituting a standard for aging temperatures, which you will need to document once a week.  I am not sure what those are, but they are definately in the works.  I am personally inclined to the cooler temps as per Francois' reasoning.