Author Topic: Coagulation, Rennet - No Clean Break, (Farmhouse Chedder)  (Read 667 times)

Offline Sue~

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Coagulation, Rennet - No Clean Break, (Farmhouse Chedder)
« on: April 23, 2011, 03:36:26 PM »
My first attempt at this, and unfortunately I didn't check the temp of the milk until after I added the rennet and it was too warm (~96).  I realize now that my water bath needs to be cooler than I had it. 

It's been about an hour, and while it's setting I'm not getting a clean break.  I've looked through the forums, but couldn't find if this is fixable or can I just make a soft cheese out of it? 


EDIT:  Apparently I'm impatient and it is slowly starting to set.  LOL
« Last Edit: April 23, 2011, 04:13:11 PM by Sue~ »


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Offline Tomer1

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Re: Coagulation, Rennet - No Clean Break, (Farmhouse Chedder)
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2011, 05:18:18 PM »
Did you get any set at all or is it still milk?
I would suggest adding more rennet and cheddering for a shorter time to get to the right curd milling+salting acidity.
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Offline Sue~

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Re: Coagulation, Rennet - No Clean Break, (Farmhouse Chedder)
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2011, 09:55:52 AM »
It did a sort of soft set after about 2 hours. I was able to get probably half the yield of curds I was expecting.  I was able to do the milling/salting, pressed over night and it held together nicely.

I've learned that I need a better way of learning temperature maintenance.  It was really varied with the water bath.   Seemed there could be a 5 degree temperature difference in various areas of the milk, sometimes more than that.   I think it was too warm when I put in the mesophilic culture too.  Even when I was getting ready to slowly raise the temp to 100, I started off at 94 degrees. 

I'm anxious to see the final product though, hopefully it's edible!   I took some pics, I'll upload them tomorrow. 

All in all, I am surprised that it is not that difficult to do, just requires some learning and patience.

Offline zenith1

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Re: Coagulation, Rennet - No Clean Break, (Farmhouse Chedder)
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2011, 03:10:48 PM »
Hi Sue~ your inability to get the elusive clean break is probably not due to the incorrect temperature at the time that you added the rennet. It is probably due to using an incorrect amount of starter or perhaps rennet. If you were using store bought milk( not fresh raw) then you would probably benefit from adding some cacl2 also.You haven't provided the details of your make -with them we can be more specific with the help we can provide. I know that lots of people use the clean break method for determining the curd cutting time including some of the very best cheesemakers of the world. Have you looked into using the spinning bowl method to determine the timing? Try searching that out here on the forum, it will provide you with a easier and more reproducible result(and it's easy)
Keith

Offline Sue~

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Re: Coagulation, Rennet - No Clean Break, (Farmhouse Chedder)
« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2011, 09:13:11 AM »
Thanks, I have a whole host of errors I made and I had posted quickly to see what could be salvaged.   Even though I have cacl2, the recipe I had used didn't have it listed even though I knew better.  Of course, now that I look up other recipes I see it in everything.  That was probably the biggest culprit, and that my rennet is probably too old. 

I did research a bunch since my first attempt, and am anxious to try a new batch! 


I do have one more question, and that there are cracks in the corners of the cheese (my press was ineffective and putting uniform pressure over the whole thing).  Anyway, do I trim those up before I wax? 



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Offline Tomer1

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Re: Coagulation, Rennet - No Clean Break, (Farmhouse Chedder)
« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2011, 04:05:33 PM »
since your waxing it doesnt matter really.
If you were using natural rind cracks make it extra difficult to control mold\yeast so a uniform shape is more important.
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Offline zenith1

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Re: Coagulation, Rennet - No Clean Break, (Farmhouse Chedder)
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2011, 05:08:24 PM »
Hard to tell from your picture just how big a problem you have. But like the Tomer has already indicated since your waxing the wheel you should be Ok as long as there is not a contaminant already lurking there. Just be sure to cover well(probably at least a couple of thin coats and get your wax as hot as you are comfortable with. Remember that working with hot wax can be dangerous at the temperatures that you need to insure killing any critters on the surface of the wheel. I'm not talking about just burns although you certainly do not want your children around-paraffin fumes can be explosive. Make sure you have ample ventilation in the area you are working. Also before you wax make sure that the wheel has dried sufficiently.
Keith

Offline Boofer

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Re: Coagulation, Rennet - No Clean Break, (Farmhouse Chedder)
« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2011, 10:34:14 PM »
paraffin fumes can be explosive.
Not cheese wax? Paraffin wax is not so flexible and can crack, creating tiny fissures that can accelerate spoilage.

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