Author Topic: Baby Gouda Molds...  (Read 1974 times)

Offline Likesspace

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Baby Gouda Molds...
« on: January 07, 2009, 10:21:31 PM »
Okay, while preparing for our year end inventory, I was working around some of our PVC fittings and today I noticed that a 3" schedule 40 pressure cap would work perfectly as a baby gouda mold.
It has a domed top and is about the perfect size for a baby gouda so I've decided to take 4 - 6 of these and give them a try.
My thoughts are to drill a few holes in the bottom of the cap and then rest them in a 3" PVC coupling (use the coupling as a base).
I will then cut some followers out of a food grade cutting board and use a 2" coupling as a device to press against the follower.
I think I can get as many as six of these set-ups under my press at once  and I'm certain they will turn out perfect little baby cheeses. The good news is that I can buy the complete set up for a little over $4.00 each at my store (cap, and the two sizes of couplings).
If I can get my followers cut out this week, I'll try it this weekend. If not, it will have to be a project for next weekend.
Regardless, I'll be sure to post some pics of my cheeses once they are finished.
I think they will look really nice stored along with my other various sized wheels.

Dave


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Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Baby Gouda Molds...
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2009, 02:09:14 AM »
Sounds good dave, if you need followers cut exactly I can cut some on my CNC. I have a ton of HDPE (cutting board material). I would suggest if you can find a hole saw use that on a drill press but remove the center guide drill so you don't get a large center hole. Make sure you clamp the piece of work securely or the hole saw will make it a frisbee and you'll be the target.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Baby Gouda Molds...
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2009, 01:13:20 PM »
Dave, I was dreaming about his last night and here's what I came up with.

I would take the 3" cap and drill some very small holes in the bottom, then drill them around the sides so when they stack the whey drips out the bottom of the top mold it doesn't have to pass through the curds of the other cheese to get out, it can just sit on the follower of the bottom one and drain out the sides.

Next I would take just a regular 2 1/2 PVC pipe and cut it into 3" high pieces and notch out the bottom, so whey can escape. Make sure you cut the PVC with a pipe cutter for copper so it will be square. Next sit the PVC pipe on a level surface and put the cap on top (cap upside down of course) and use a small torpedo level to level out the cap, then hot glue the PVC to it. You could use drinking water safe PVC glue but it won't give you enough work time to level it out, you know, it sticks almost instantly.

There you have it. The base and mold are together and can stack easily. Besides PVC pipe is a hellofalot cheaper than couplings.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.

Offline Likesspace

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Re: Baby Gouda Molds...
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2009, 07:24:14 PM »
That's an interesting idea Carter.
I was just planning on using four of the caps....sitting side by side, allowing the press to push down on all of them at once (I presently use the 4 post sliding press that seems to be very popular).
Now that you've mentioned stacking the molds and gluing the cap and mold together, I'm thinking I might just have to go this route.
As for the followers, I've always used a rotozip to cut them out. All in all it works really well, although it is easy to nick the edges a little. I usually cut them just a little bit larger than I need and then smooth them off on a bench grinder. I do appreciate the offer of making them on your CNC machine.
I doubt that I'll be able to make the gouda molds this weekend, afterall. As it turns out, I have a lot to do over the next day or two so I'm not even sure I'll get any cheese made.
Hopefully that won't be the case, but it's not looking too good at this point.
Thanks again for the advice and the suggestions. I do appreciate it.

Dave

Offline Cartierusm

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Re: Baby Gouda Molds...
« Reply #4 on: January 09, 2009, 12:05:26 AM »
No problem. I'm always in the shop. Check out my new post on Cheese Press #3.
Life is like a box of chocolates sometimes too much rennet makes you kill people.


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