Author Topic: Beestings Pudding/ Colostrum  (Read 1857 times)

Offline Susan

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Beestings Pudding/ Colostrum
« on: June 20, 2011, 08:27:38 PM »
My farmer friend's Jersey cow had her darling little baby yesterday.  So I thought it would be fun to play with colostrum.  I've never tried it.  So I did.  Not delicious.  But not bad either.  I've read about Beestings Pudding so thought I'd try that too.  But didn't seem to work for me.

First recipe I found on this forum called for some milk, double that amt colostrum and some sugar (I added vanilla). Heat in double boiler until thick.  But it never really got thick.  I saw other recipies that called for colostrum only and some that heated it in the oven.  Tried that too.  Never really seemed to get thick but started to get bubbly.  I'm letting then all cool to see what will happen.  So far they are all pretty liquid.  Anyone else ever try this? 

And how do you strain this stuff?!  It is so thick.  Will hardly go through a filter.  What causes it (the pudding) to thicken?  Albumin?  I think that is a big molecule.  Could I have filtered it out?
Susan


Offline Kevin_Huglo

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Re: Beestings Pudding/ Colostrum
« Reply #1 on: August 26, 2012, 08:50:32 AM »
So I thought it would be fun to play with colostrum.  I've never tried it.  So I did.  Not delicious.  But not bad either.  I've read about Beestings Pudding so thought I'd try that too.  But didn't seem to work for me.

Hi,

I live on a milk farm here in western Norway where excess beestings is mostly thrown away. The first milk is mixed with the second milking in the ratio of 2 to 1 ( i.e. two parts of first milk to one part second milk). Add sugar and cinnanon to taste. The mixture is then decanted into a dish and placed in "bain marie" in an oven and baked for about 40 mins at 170 degrees centigrade - you must catch it before it becomes "rubbery"!

An alternative way of cooking it is to mix it as above ( this seems to be standard practice here) and place it in a saucepan with sugar and vanilla essence.  Put the saucepan on the heat STIRRING CONTINUOUSLY ( most important!) As the milk comes up to the boiling point it will thicken ( DO NOT ALLOW TO BOIL!) - take it of the heat and allow to cool. It will thicken more as it cools. Serve as cold custard.

I hope you have fun experimenting- my wife makes a stonkingly good  rice pudding with the stuff.

Regards